VHS Catalog: 12/22/2014 09:54:32 AM

Course Title: 101 Ways to Write a Short Story Section DB
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: The purpose of this course is to provide a study of the short story form and to serve as an outlet for student writers to engage in a dialogue about their work in a safe environment. By reading various short stories in a variety of literary genres, the student will develop a basic understanding of the short story form. Using this knowledge, the student will craft two short stories. Students will also visit sites that cater to short story publishing, editing and reviewing, as well as sites that provide creative resources for short story writing.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Deborah Baker
Tiffin Columbian High School


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Course Title: 101 Ways to Write a Short Story Section SH
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: The purpose of this course is to provide a study of the short story form and to serve as an outlet for student writers to engage in a dialogue about their work in a safe environment. By reading various short stories in a variety of literary genres, the student will develop a basic understanding of the short story form. Using this knowledge, the student will craft two short stories. Students will also visit sites that cater to short story publishing, editing and reviewing, as well as sites that provide creative resources for short story writing.
All course materials are available online.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Sarah Hanson
Tri-County Technical Center


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Course Title: 101 Ways to Write a Short Story Section TM
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: The purpose of this course is to provide a study of the short story form and to serve as an outlet for student writers to engage in a dialogue about their work in a safe environment. By reading various short stories in a variety of literary genres, the student will develop a basic understanding of the short story form. Using this knowledge, the student will craft two short stories. Students will also visit sites that cater to short story publishing, editing and reviewing, as well as sites that provide creative resources for short story writing.
All course materials are available online.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Timothy Moore
Griswold High School


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Course Title: Academic Writing Section GS
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: ESL students must be at advanced level
Description: Here’s the place to learn how to write clear, clean essays! Writing in a school setting is often perceived to be an anxiety-producing and unnecessarily laborious process. This course is designed to turn writing into a more accessible and more positive experience for all levels of writers. Academic Writing is a fifteen-week class. Students will focus on reading comprehension and writing skills using process writing.

There will be three major readings and three major essays in the class. The readings include The Sun Also Rises, The Little Prince, and a biography (students'choice). Materials will be accessed online. Please note that The Sun Also Rises may be considered to be either of a controversial or a mature nature.

Students will learn to read for meaning, use the writing process with multiple drafts, practice peer editing and self editing, and understand the grammar and mechanics involved in the writing and editing process. There will also be weekly reflective journal entries with peer interaction through reflective comments on each other’s entries.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Gwynne Sawtelle
Medfield High School


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Course Title: Academic Writing Section HS Private Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: ESL students must be at advanced level
Description: **This is a private offering for Cincinnati Prep students**

Here’s the place to learn how to write clear, clean essays! Writing in a school setting is often perceived to be an anxiety-producing and unnecessarily laborious process. This course is designed to turn writing into a more accessible and more positive experience for all levels of writers. Academic Writing is a fifteen-week class. Students will focus on reading comprehension and writing skills using process writing.

There will be three major readings and three major essays in the class. The readings include The Sun Also Rises, The Little Prince, and a biography (students'choice). Materials will be accessed online. Please note that The Sun Also Rises may be considered to be either of a controversial or a mature nature.

Students will learn to read for meaning, use the writing process with multiple drafts, practice peer editing and self editing, and understand the grammar and mechanics involved in the writing and editing process. There will also be weekly reflective journal entries with peer interaction through reflective comments on each other’s entries.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Heather Stem
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


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Course Title: Academic Writing Section NC Private Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: ESL students must be at advanced level
Description: **This is a private offering for Cincinnati Prep students**

Here’s the place to learn how to write clear, clean essays! Writing in a school setting is often perceived to be an anxiety-producing and unnecessarily laborious process. This course is designed to turn writing into a more accessible and more positive experience for all levels of writers. Academic Writing is a fifteen-week class. Students will focus on reading comprehension and writing skills using process writing.

There will be three major readings and three major essays in the class. The readings include The Sun Also Rises, The Little Prince, and a biography (students'choice). Materials will be accessed online. Please note that The Sun Also Rises may be considered to be either of a controversial or a mature nature.

Students will learn to read for meaning, use the writing process with multiple drafts, practice peer editing and self editing, and understand the grammar and mechanics involved in the writing and editing process. There will also be weekly reflective journal entries with peer interaction through reflective comments on each other’s entries.

Nora Clooney
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


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Course Title: Accelerated Physical Science Private Offering HHS (T3)
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


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Course Title: Accelerated Physical Science Private Offering HHS (T3)
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Kerry Gargaro
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Accelerated Physical Science Private Offering HHS (T3)
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Lisa Tomlinson
Holly High School


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Course Title: Advanced English Literature Honors Section NA
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Freshman Honors English or the equivalent
Description: Advanced English Literature Honors is a course for the serious literature student and is intended to prepare students for the rigor of taking a college level AP English Literature course. Therefore, students can expect to spend 8-10 hours a week in this Honors class. The textbook for the course, Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense, is a college textbook.

The course encourages students to read, interpret, and write about imaginative literature in all genres. The readings, chosen from a variety of periods, are complex and invite rereading, multiple interpretations and analytical interpretation of the text. Students will explore theme, plot and structure, characterization, point of view, symbol, allegory and fantasy, humor and irony through a wide variety of short fiction. They will learn about literary terms and be able to apply that terminology within class discussions and on individual weekly assignments. Students will also learn various aspects of poetry including denotation and connotation, imagery, figurative language, allusion and tone. They will learn how to approach the reading of poetry in order to decipher the impact of any given poem. Drama and its unique elements will be introduced as well at the end of the course.

Writing is a key component that will extend throughout the entire course. Students will learn different aspects of writing and assignments will focus on incorporating the critical analysis of literature by implementing the writing elements necessary for a solid and convincing essay. Collaborating weekly in several discussions and in an extended group project will help students foster a learning community and the critical thinking necessary to carry them to the next level in the AP study of literature.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Noreen Andrews
Union Catholic Regional High School


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Course Title: Advanced English Literature Honors Section NA
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Freshman Honors English or the equivalent
Description: Advanced English Literature Honors is a course for the serious literature student and is intended to prepare students for the rigor of taking a college level AP English Literature course. Therefore, students can expect to spend 8-10 hours a week in this Honors class. The textbook for the course, Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense, is a college textbook.

The course encourages students to read, interpret, and write about imaginative literature in all genres. The readings, chosen from a variety of periods, are complex and invite rereading, multiple interpretations and analytical interpretation of the text. Students will explore theme, plot and structure, characterization, point of view, symbol, allegory and fantasy, humor and irony through a wide variety of short fiction. They will learn about literary terms and be able to apply that terminology within class discussions and on individual weekly assignments. Students will also learn various aspects of poetry including denotation and connotation, imagery, figurative language, allusion and tone. They will learn how to approach the reading of poetry in order to decipher the impact of any given poem. Drama and its unique elements will be introduced as well at the end of the course.

Writing is a key component that will extend throughout the entire course. Students will learn different aspects of writing and assignments will focus on incorporating the critical analysis of literature by implementing the writing elements necessary for a solid and convincing essay. Collaborating weekly in several discussions and in an extended group project will help students foster a learning community and the critical thinking necessary to carry them to the next level in the AP study of literature.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Noreen Andrews
Union Catholic Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Advanced Topics In Chemistry Section DH
Discipline: Science - Chemistry
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One year of introductory chemistry with a hands-on laboratory component is required for success on the AP Exam. Strong math background required. Students should be enrolled in Algebra 2 or preferably have completed Algebra 2 prior to enrolling in Advanced or AP Chemistry. Tech requirement: Lab software is completely compatible with PCs and with Macs that run Mac OS X or higher. Compatibility issues with older MAC OS versions (7.x, 8.x, 9.x). Students need PC or Mac OSX access to complete lab activities on a biweekly basis.
Description: This full-year advanced chemistry class is equivalent to a first year chemistry class at any college or university in the United States. If you have successfully completed a course in high school chemistry and are looking for a challenge, then this may be just the right course for you! This class will prepare you to take the AP chemistry exam in May, and, depending on your exam results, you may earn college credits.

The textbook used in this chemistry course, Chemistry The Central Science by Theodore Brown, Eugene LeMay, et. al. is used in many college chemistry classes. The laboratory experiments will be done using an interactive computer program. An important part of the course will be a required interaction with your peers in on-line discussion groups. Also, each student will be required to submit an original, written research project.

Although this course is necessarily rigorous, it will place you in an excellent position to study chemistry further and/or to pursue a career in the sciences or technology. In this 33 week course, some of the subjects covered are: the atom, stoichiometry, solutions, thermochemistry, periodic properties, chemical bonding, gases, intermolecular forces, kinetics, equilibrium, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, etc. So, if you want to know more about the science of chemistry, this course is just what you need - compelling and satisfying!Darlene Hardy
Quakertown Community Sr. High


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Course Title: Advanced Topics In Chemistry Section KZ
Discipline: Science - Chemistry
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One year of introductory chemistry with a hands-on laboratory component is required for success on the AP Exam. Strong math background required. Students should be enrolled in Algebra 2 or preferably have completed Algebra 2 prior to enrolling in Advanced or AP Chemistry. Tech requirement: Lab software is completely compatible with PCs and with Macs that run Mac OS X or higher. Compatibility issues with older MAC OS versions (7.x, 8.x, 9.x). Students need PC or Mac OSX access to complete lab activities on a biweekly basis.
Description: This full-year advanced chemistry class is equivalent to a first year chemistry class at any college or university in the United States. If you have successfully completed a course in high school chemistry and are looking for a challenge, then this may be just the right course for you! This class will prepare you to take the AP chemistry exam in May, and, depending on your exam results, you may earn college credits.

The textbook used in this chemistry course, Chemistry The Central Science by Theodore Brown, Eugene LeMay, et. al. is used in many college chemistry classes. The laboratory experiments will be done using an interactive computer program. An important part of the course will be a required interaction with your peers in on-line discussion groups. Also, each student will be required to submit an original, written research project.

Although this course is necessarily rigorous, it will place you in an excellent position to study chemistry further and/or to pursue a career in the sciences or technology. In this 33 week course, some of the subjects covered are: the atom, stoichiometry, solutions, thermochemistry, periodic properties, chemical bonding, gases, intermolecular forces, kinetics, equilibrium, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, etc. So, if you want to know more about the science of chemistry, this course is just what you need - compelling and satisfying!Kevin Zahm
Middletown RI High School


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Course Title: Algebra 1 Section ES
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra
Description: This course is designed to teach the essential concepts of Algebra 1 to first-time students during a 33 - week time period. It will cover topics such as Order of Operations, Absolute Value, Solving (1st Degree) Equations, Solving Inequalities, Systems of Equations, Graphing Linear Functions, Exponents, and Higher Order Equations.

Required Materials: Graphing Calculator

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Elizabeth Sullivan
Littleton MA High School


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Course Title: Algebra 1 Summer Offering
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer School Extended Session
Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra
Description: This is an eight week summer course. This course covers a full year of Algebra I concepts for credit recovery .

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.

Please note that because this course is eight weeks in duration, and students are expected to work approximately ten hours per week, the course will therefore not cover a full year's curriculum with the same depth that is covered in a year-long course. In addition, if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Susan Robinson
Virtual High School


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Course Title: Algebra 2 Honors
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Student must have completed Algebra 1 and either completed Geometry or be taking it concurrently. Student must have access to a high-speed (DSL or cable) Internet connection at least 4 days weekly, including a computer with sound and Java applet support, Microsoft Excel or Google Spreadsheet, a media player that can play Windows Media Player (WMA) and RealPlayer (RM) files, and a scanner or digital camera/phone. Materials Required: A scientific calculator and textbook.
Description: This course is designed to enable students to master the knowledge and skills enumerated in the NCTM Algebra 2 Learning Standards. These include linear equations, polynomials, rational expressions, irrational and complex numbers, quadratics, analytic geometry, triangle and circle trigonometry, exponentials and logarithms, sequences and series, statistics and probability, and matrix operations. Students will be required to read and work problems from the text, participate in small group discussions, view video lectures, complete computer-aided instruction, complete virtual labs, and complete an extensive array of tests and quizzes. John Clayton
South High Community School


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Course Title: Algebra 2 Section BM
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Student must have completed Algebra 1 and either completed Geometry or be taking it concurrently. Student must have access to a high-speed (DSL or cable) Internet connection at least 4 days weekly, including a PC with sound and Java applet support, and a scanner.

Materials Required: A graphing calculator.
Description: This course is designed to enable students to master the knowledge and skills enumerated in the NCTM Algebra 2 Learning Standards. These include linear equations, polynomials, rational expressions, irrational and complex numbers, quadratics, analytic geometry, triangle and circle trigonometry, exponentials and logarithms, sequences and series, statistics and probability, and matrix operations. Students will be required to read and work problems from the text, participate in small group discussions, view video lectures, complete computer-aided instruction, complete virtual labs, and complete an extensive array of tests and quizzes.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Barbara Marano
Virtual High School


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Course Title: Algebra 2 Summer Offering
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer School Extended Session
Prerequisites:
Description: This is an eight week summer course. This course covers a full year of Algebra II concepts for credit recovery.

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.

Please note that because this course is eight weeks in duration, and students are expected to work approximately ten hours per week, the course will therefore not cover a full year's curriculum with the same depth that is covered in a year-long course. In addition, if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Virtual High School


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Course Title: American Popular Music Section AD
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An open mind and a love of music.
Students will need computers with the ability to watch on-line streaming video
Students will need computers with the ability to listen to on-line audio files.

Students must be able to access streaming audio files for this course. Widgets are embedded in course files which link to US Copyright compliant music streaming websites such as http://www.grooveshark.com.
Description: *Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Are you an avid music fan, enthralled by the songs and interested in the stories behind them? Do you believe that art reflects life or do you think it's the other way around? Well, American Popular Music is where you can find the answer.

In this course we will look at the evolution of pop music from early American folk music through the Rock -n - Roll of the 1960's, in an effort to understand the unique relationship between music and society. Of course we won't be able to cover all of the music in between, but we will look at representative periods and artists along the way. We'll also look at how the business of music works, taking into consideration the recording industry, radio, and performing.

Coursework will include listening to and analyzing music, researching various topics, discussing opinions and working with others to simulate different music industry scenarios.

Students must be able to access streaming audio files for this course. Widgets are embedded in course files which link to US Copyright compliant music streaming websites such as http://www.grooveshark.com.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Albert DeNoncour
Douglas High School


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Course Title: American Popular Music Section JC
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: an open mind and a love of music

Students must be able to access streaming audio files for this course. Widgets are embedded in course files which link to US Copyright compliant music streaming websites such as http://www.grooveshark.com.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Are you an avid music fan, enthralled by the songs and interested in the stories behind them? Do you believe that art reflects life or do you think it's the other way around? Well, American Popular Music is where you can find the answer.

In this course we will look at the evolution of pop music from early American folk music through the Rock -n - Roll of the 1960's, in an effort to understand the unique relationship between music and society. Of course we won't be able to cover all of the music in between, but we will look at representative periods and artists along the way. We'll also look at how the business of music works, taking into consideration the recording industry, radio, and performing.

Coursework will include listening to and analyzing music, researching various topics, discussing opinions and working with others to simulate different music industry scenarios.

Students must be able to access streaming audio files for this course. Widgets are embedded in course files which link to US Copyright compliant music streaming websites such as http://www.grooveshark.com.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Jason Caron
Hudson High School


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Course Title: American Popular Music Section TM
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: an open mind and a love of music;

Students must be able to access streaming audio files for this course. Widgets are embedded in course files which link to US Copyright compliant music streaming websites such as http://www.grooveshark.com.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Are you an avid music fan, enthralled by the songs and interested in the stories behind them? Do you believe that art reflects life or do you think it's the other way around? Well, American Popular Music is where you can find the answer.

In this course we will look at the evolution of pop music from early American folk music through the Rock -n - Roll of the 1960's, in an effort to understand the unique relationship between music and society. Of course we won't be able to cover all of the music in between, but we will look at representative periods and artists along the way. We'll also look at how the business of music works, taking into consideration the recording industry, radio, and performing.

Coursework will include listening to and analyzing music, researching various topics, discussing opinions and working with others to simulate different music industry scenarios.

Students must be able to access streaming audio files for this course. Widgets are embedded in course files which link to US Copyright compliant music streaming websites such as http://www.grooveshark.com.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Tom Moran
Canton CT High School


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Course Title: Anatomy and Physiology Section AS
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Students must be mature enough to handle urinary and reproductive system content.
Technical requirements: NIH ImageJ (free imaging software)
Description: How can the results of an ECG (EKG) indicate heart pathology? How does a bone grow? What are the latest developments in reproductive medicine? How does the histology of a normal lung compare to that with emphysema? These are among the questions that are addressed in Anatomy and Physiology.

This is an honors level course that is designed to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the 11 major body systems. This course begins with a quick review of biological levels of organization and microscopy and then focuses on both structure and function of the following systems: skeletal system, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, immune, endocrine and nervous. The course culminates with a look at how the systems work together to ensure homeostasis for the body and what happens when one or more of these systems don't function correctly.

Students play anatomy games, complete online quizzes, analyze histology data (using NIH imaging software) and communicate results in lab reports, complete shorter writing assignments, conduct "hands on" labs and activities, and research specific topics such as hormones, viruses and the senses. Students regularly engage in virtual "lab meetings" and discussions about the latest topics associated with each system. During the first term, students work individually on a project that looks at the structure and function of a particular type of cell. Students collaborate with classmates in a team project to identify the anatomy and physiology associated with a particular disease during the second term.

The content and pace of the course require students to attend class and complete work regularly; it is expected that students will spend 8-10 hours per week on average in this course. Those who have successfully completed a biology course and are looking for a challenging study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body are good candidates for the course. Amy Sunke
Appleton eSchool


* - - - *

Course Title: Anatomy and Physiology Section DM
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Students must be mature enough to handle urinary and reproductive system content.
Technical requirements: NIH ImageJ (free imaging software)
Description: How can the results of an ECG (EKG) indicate heart pathology? How does a bone grow? What are the latest developments in reproductive medicine? How does the histology of a normal lung compare to that with emphysema? These are among the questions that are addressed in Anatomy and Physiology.

This is an honors level course that is designed to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the 11 major body systems. This course begins with a quick review of biological levels of organization and microscopy and then focuses on both structure and function of the following systems: skeletal system, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, immune, endocrine and nervous. The course culminates with a look at how the systems work together to ensure homeostasis for the body and what happens when one or more of these systems don't function correctly.

Students play anatomy games, complete online quizzes, analyze histology data (using NIH imaging software) and communicate results in lab reports, complete shorter writing assignments, conduct "hands on" labs and activities, and research specific topics such as hormones, viruses and the senses. Students regularly engage in virtual "lab meetings" and discussions about the latest topics associated with each system. During the first term, students work individually on a project that looks at the structure and function of a particular type of cell. Students collaborate with classmates in a team project to identify the anatomy and physiology associated with a particular disease during the second term.

The content and pace of the course require students to attend class and complete work regularly; it is expected that students will spend 8-10 hours per week on average in this course. Those who have successfully completed a biology course and are looking for a challenging study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body are good candidates for the course. Diane Moore
Mount Anthony Union High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Anatomy and Physiology Section JH
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Students must be mature enough to handle urinary and reproductive system content.
Technical requirements: NIH ImageJ (free imaging software)
Description: How can the results of an ECG (EKG) indicate heart pathology? How does a bone grow? What are the latest developments in reproductive medicine? How does the histology of a normal lung compare to that with emphysema? These are among the questions that are addressed in Anatomy and Physiology.

This is an honors level course that is designed to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the 11 major body systems. This course begins with a quick review of biological levels of organization and microscopy and then focuses on both structure and function of the following systems: skeletal system, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, immune, endocrine and nervous. The course culminates with a look at how the systems work together to ensure homeostasis for the body and what happens when one or more of these systems don't function correctly.

Students play anatomy games, complete online quizzes, analyze histology data (using NIH imaging software) and communicate results in lab reports, complete shorter writing assignments, conduct "hands on" labs and activities, and research specific topics such as hormones, viruses and the senses. Students regularly engage in virtual "lab meetings" and discussions about the latest topics associated with each system. During the first term, students work individually on a project that looks at the structure and function of a particular type of cell. Students collaborate with classmates in a team project to identify the anatomy and physiology associated with a particular disease during the second term.

The content and pace of the course require students to attend class and complete work regularly; it is expected that students will spend 8-10 hours per week on average in this course. Those who have successfully completed a biology course and are looking for a challenging study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body are good candidates for the course. Jamie Holloway
East Central High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Anatomy and Physiology Section MJD
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Students must be mature enough to handle urinary and reproductive system content.
Technical requirements: NIH ImageJ (free imaging software)
Description: How can the results of an ECG (EKG) indicate heart pathology? How does a bone grow? What are the latest developments in reproductive medicine? How does the histology of a normal lung compare to that with emphysema? These are among the questions that are addressed in Anatomy and Physiology.

This is an honors level course that is designed to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the 11 major body systems. This course begins with a quick review of biological levels of organization and microscopy and then focuses on both structure and function of the following systems: skeletal system, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, immune, endocrine and nervous. The course culminates with a look at how the systems work together to ensure homeostasis for the body and what happens when one or more of these systems don't function correctly.

Students play anatomy games, complete online quizzes, analyze histology data (using NIH imaging software) and communicate results in lab reports, complete shorter writing assignments, conduct "hands on" labs and activities, and research specific topics such as hormones, viruses and the senses. Students regularly engage in virtual "lab meetings" and discussions about the latest topics associated with each system. During the first term, students work individually on a project that looks at the structure and function of a particular type of cell. Students collaborate with classmates in a team project to identify the anatomy and physiology associated with a particular disease during the second term.

The content and pace of the course require students to attend class and complete work regularly; it is expected that students will spend 8-10 hours per week on average in this course. Those who have successfully completed a biology course and are looking for a challenging study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body are good candidates for the course. Mary Jane Davis
Red Bank Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Anatomy and Physiology Section PB
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Students must be mature enough to handle urinary and reproductive system content.
Technical requirements: NIH ImageJ (free imaging software)
Description: How can the results of an ECG (EKG) indicate heart pathology? How does a bone grow? What are the latest developments in reproductive medicine? How does the histology of a normal lung compare to that with emphysema? These are among the questions that are addressed in Anatomy and Physiology.
This is an honors level course that is designed to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the 11 major body systems. This course begins with a quick review of biological levels of organization and microscopy and then focuses on both structure and function of the following systems: skeletal system, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, immune, endocrine and nervous. The course culminates with a look at how the systems work together to ensure homeostasis for the body and what happens when one or more of these systems don't function correctly.
Students play anatomy games, complete online quizzes, analyze histology data (using NIH imaging software) and communicate results in lab reports, complete shorter writing assignments, conduct "hands on" labs and activities, and research specific topics such as hormones, viruses and the senses. Students regularly engage in virtual "lab meetings" and discussions about the latest topics associated with each system. During the first term, students work individually on a project that looks at the structure and function of a particular type of cell. Students collaborate with classmates in a team project to identify the anatomy and physiology associated with a particular disease during the second term.
The content and pace of the course require students to attend class and complete work regularly; it is expected that students will spend 8-10 hours per week on average in this course. Those who have successfully completed a biology course and are looking for a challenging study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body are good candidates for the course. Peggy Babson
Delaware City Schools


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Course Title: Anatomy and Physiology Section SL
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Students must be mature enough to handle urinary and reproductive system content.
Technical requirements: NIH ImageJ (free imaging software)
Description: How can the results of an ECG (EKG) indicate heart pathology? How does a bone grow? What are the latest developments in reproductive medicine? How does the histology of a normal lung compare to that with emphysema? These are among the questions that are addressed in Anatomy and Physiology.

This is an honors level course that is designed to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the 11 major body systems. This course begins with a quick review of biological levels of organization and microscopy and then focuses on both structure and function of the following systems: skeletal system, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, immune, endocrine and nervous. The course culminates with a look at how the systems work together to ensure homeostasis for the body and what happens when one or more of these systems don't function correctly.

Students play anatomy games, complete online quizzes, analyze histology data (using NIH imaging software) and communicate results in lab reports, complete shorter writing assignments, conduct "hands on" labs and activities, and research specific topics such as hormones, viruses and the senses. Students regularly engage in virtual "lab meetings" and discussions about the latest topics associated with each system. During the first term, students work individually on a project that looks at the structure and function of a particular type of cell. Students collaborate with classmates in a team project to identify the anatomy and physiology associated with a particular disease during the second term.

The content and pace of the course require students to attend class and complete work regularly; it is expected that students will spend 8-10 hours per week on average in this course. Those who have successfully completed a biology course and are looking for a challenging study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body are good candidates for the course. Stacie Tranchina
St. Dominic High School


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Course Title: Animal Behavior and Zoology Section CJ
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Have you always been interested in animals and their behavior? Do you love to spend time at zoos and aquariums, and find animals (and their interactions) fascinating? This course explores the tremendous diversity of animal life and the interconnectedness of different animal species with each other and with humans. The first part of the course explores the classification and characteristics of all the animal phyla, with an emphasis on the evolution of animals and the adaptations that have allowed such diversity to flourish. The second part of the course focuses on many different animal behaviors (including human behavior). We will learn about different types of behaviors – from innate (genetic) behaviors to learned behaviors. The social interactions between animals will be covered in depth as we study courtship, aggression, altruism, and parental behaviors in animals. We will also discuss different careers in the animal sciences as a culminating activity, which should be of great interest to students who wish to pursue their love of animals as their professions. The course will utilize a number of interesting articles, discussions, virtual field trips, activities, videos, and projects to give a wider perspective of the animal kingdom and animal behavior.Carrie Johnson
Lander Valley High School


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Course Title: Animal Behavior and Zoology Section CV
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Have you always been interested in animals and their behavior? Do you love to spend time at zoos and aquariums, and find animals (and their interactions) fascinating? This course explores the tremendous diversity of animal life and the interconnectedness of different animal species with each other and with humans. The first part of the course explores the classification and characteristics of all the animal phyla, with an emphasis on the evolution of animals and the adaptations that have allowed such diversity to flourish. The second part of the course focuses on many different animal behaviors (including human behavior). We will learn about different types of behaviors – from innate (genetic) behaviors to learned behaviors. The social interactions between animals will be covered in depth as we study courtship, aggression, altruism, and parental behaviors in animals. We will also discuss different careers in the animal sciences as a culminating activity, which should be of great interest to students who wish to pursue their love of animals as their professions. The course will utilize a number of interesting articles, discussions, virtual field trips, activities, videos, and projects to give a wider perspective of the animal kingdom and animal behavior. Christopher Vander Baan
Whitinsville Christian School


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Course Title: Animal Behavior and Zoology Section LMG
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Have you always been interested in animals and their behavior? Do you love to spend time at zoos and aquariums, and find animals (and their interactions) fascinating? This course explores the tremendous diversity of animal life and the interconnectedness of different animal species with each other and with humans. The first part of the course explores the classification and characteristics of all the animal phyla, with an emphasis on the evolution of animals and the adaptations that have allowed such diversity to flourish. The second part of the course focuses on many different animal behaviors (including human behavior). We will learn about different types of behaviors – from innate (genetic) behaviors to learned behaviors. The social interactions between animals will be covered in depth as we study courtship, aggression, altruism, and parental behaviors in animals. We will also discuss different careers in the animal sciences as a culminating activity, which should be of great interest to students who wish to pursue their love of animals as their professions. The course will utilize a number of interesting articles, discussions, virtual field trips, activities, videos, and projects to give a wider perspective of the animal kingdom and animal behavior.Liza-Marie Griebenauw
Fluvanna County High School


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Course Title: Animal Behavior and Zoology Section RM
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Have you always been interested in animals and their behavior? Do you love to spend time at zoos and aquariums, and find animals (and their interactions) fascinating? This course explores the tremendous diversity of animal life and the interconnectedness of different animal species with each other and with humans. The first part of the course explores the classification and characteristics of all the animal phyla, with an emphasis on the evolution of animals and the adaptations that have allowed such diversity to flourish. The second part of the course focuses on many different animal behaviors (including human behavior). We will learn about different types of behaviors – from innate (genetic) behaviors to learned behaviors. The social interactions between animals will be covered in depth as we study courtship, aggression, altruism, and parental behaviors in animals. We will also discuss different careers in the animal sciences as a culminating activity, which should be of great interest to students who wish to pursue their love of animals as their professions. The course will utilize a number of interesting articles, discussions, virtual field trips, activities, videos, and projects to give a wider perspective of the animal kingdom and animal behavior. Regina McGillivray
Natick High School


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Course Title: Animal Behavior and Zoology Section TS
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description:
Have you always been interested in animals and their behavior? Do you love to spend time at zoos and aquariums, and find animals (and their interactions) fascinating? This course explores the tremendous diversity of animal life and the interconnectedness of different animal species with each other and with humans. The first part of the course explores the classification and characteristics of all the animal phyla, with an emphasis on the evolution of animals and the adaptations that have allowed such diversity to flourish. The second part of the course focuses on many different animal behaviors (including human behavior). We will learn about different types of behaviors – from innate (genetic) behaviors to learned behaviors. The social interactions between animals will be covered in depth as we study courtship, aggression, altruism, and parental behaviors in animals. We will also discuss different careers in the animal sciences as a culminating activity, which should be of great interest to students who wish to pursue their love of animals as their professions. The course will utilize a number of interesting articles, discussions, virtual field trips, activities, videos, and projects to give a wider perspective of the animal kingdom and animal behavior.Theresa Schwantes
Virtual High School


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Course Title: Animal Behavior and Zoology Section VD
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Have you always been interested in animals and their behavior? Do you love to spend time at zoos and aquariums, and find animals (and their interactions) fascinating? This course explores the tremendous diversity of animal life and the interconnectedness of different animal species with each other and with humans. The first part of the course explores the classification and characteristics of all the animal phyla, with an emphasis on the evolution of animals and the adaptations that have allowed such diversity to flourish. The second part of the course focuses on many different animal behaviors (including human behavior). We will learn about different types of behaviors – from innate (genetic) behaviors to learned behaviors. The social interactions between animals will be covered in depth as we study courtship, aggression, altruism, and parental behaviors in animals. We will also discuss different careers in the animal sciences as a culminating activity, which should be of great interest to students who wish to pursue their love of animals as their professions. The course will utilize a number of interesting articles, discussions, virtual field trips, activities, videos, and projects to give a wider perspective of the animal kingdom and animal behavior. Vanessa Deluca
Hatboro-Horsham High School


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Course Title: Animal Behavior and Zoology Section VW2
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Have you always been interested in animals and their behavior? Do you love to spend time at zoos and aquariums, and find animals (and their interactions) fascinating? This course explores the tremendous diversity of animal life and the interconnectedness of different animal species with each other and with humans. The first part of the course explores the classification and characteristics of all the animal phyla, with an emphasis on the evolution of animals and the adaptations that have allowed such diversity to flourish. The second part of the course focuses on many different animal behaviors (including human behavior). We will learn about different types of behaviors – from innate (genetic) behaviors to learned behaviors. The social interactions between animals will be covered in depth as we study courtship, aggression, altruism, and parental behaviors in animals. We will also discuss different careers in the animal sciences as a culminating activity, which should be of great interest to students who wish to pursue their love of animals as their professions. The course will utilize a number of interesting articles, discussions, virtual field trips, activities, videos, and projects to give a wider perspective of the animal kingdom and animal behavior. Valerie Williams
North Arlington High School


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Course Title: AP® Art History Section JC
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Access to Adobe Reader, Java, and Quicktime, audio capabilities, access to a printer and digital camera, microphone recording capability preferred but not required.
Description:
**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

The study of art production throughout humankind in historic as well as prehistoric times produces a unique perspective of the era under scrutiny. The visual language of human beings speaks more directly and immediately through the age than any other form of human communication.

The function of the art is not only to show life as it is, but to show life as it should be.
-W.E.B. DuBois

“According to the dictionary, something is important if it has ‘much significance or consequence’; to be significant, an activity must be ‘expressive of meaning’; to have consequence it must have ‘an effect or result’...art is important because it expresses meanings and because it creates effects and results.”
-Edmund B. Feldman

Students will acquire a comprehensive knowledge of historically significant artists, movements, aesthetic theories and practices, ranging from the prehistoric times to the significant contributions in the 21st Century. Art production of all cultures will be studies in relative proportion to their representation on the Art History Advanced Placement Exam. Students will see the development of trends, movements and events in art, how they reflected and affected the times in which they occurred, gaining insight into typically misunderstood topics pertaining to the visual arts. Students will research and write knowledgeably on a number of art history topics, reflecting and synthesizing their own theories on the many works they will see in virtual museums and collections.. They will be expected through carefully structured assignments, to exhibit an extensive scholarship in conjunction with these experiences.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Jennifer Carey
Trinity Valley School


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Course Title: AP® Art History Section KD
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Access to Adobe Reader, Java, and Quicktime, audio capabilities, access to a printer and digital camera, microphone recording capability preferred but not required.
Description:
**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

The study of art production throughout humankind in historic as well as prehistoric times produces a unique perspective of the era under scrutiny. The visual language of human beings speaks more directly and immediately through the age than any other form of human communication.

The function of the art is not only to show life as it is, but to show life as it should be.
-W.E.B. DuBois

“According to the dictionary, something is important if it has ‘much significance or consequence’; to be significant, an activity must be ‘expressive of meaning’; to have consequence it must have ‘an effect or result’...art is important because it expresses meanings and because it creates effects and results.”
-Edmund B. Feldman

Students will acquire a comprehensive knowledge of historically significant artists, movements, aesthetic theories and practices, ranging from the prehistoric times to the significant contributions in the 21st Century. Art production of all cultures will be studies in relative proportion to their representation on the Art History Advanced Placement Exam. Students will see the development of trends, movements and events in art, how they reflected and affected the times in which they occurred, gaining insight into typically misunderstood topics pertaining to the visual arts. Students will research and write knowledgeably on a number of art history topics, reflecting and synthesizing their own theories on the many works they will see in virtual museums and collections.. They will be expected through carefully structured assignments, to exhibit an extensive scholarship in conjunction with these experiences.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Kathleen Doyle
North River Collaborative


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Course Title: AP® Art History Section SV
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Access to Adobe Reader, Java, and Quicktime, audio capabilities, access to a printer and digital camera, microphone recording capability preferred but not required.
Description:
**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

The study of art production throughout humankind in historic as well as prehistoric times produces a unique perspective of the era under scrutiny. The visual language of human beings speaks more directly and immediately through the age than any other form of human communication.

The function of the art is not only to show life as it is, but to show life as it should be.
-W.E.B. DuBois

“According to the dictionary, something is important if it has ‘much significance or consequence’; to be significant, an activity must be ‘expressive of meaning’; to have consequence it must have ‘an effect or result’...art is important because it expresses meanings and because it creates effects and results.”
-Edmund B. Feldman

Students will acquire a comprehensive knowledge of historically significant artists, movements, aesthetic theories and practices, ranging from the prehistoric times to the significant contributions in the 21st Century. Art production of all cultures will be studies in relative proportion to their representation on the Art History Advanced Placement Exam. Students will see the development of trends, movements and events in art, how they reflected and affected the times in which they occurred, gaining insight into typically misunderstood topics pertaining to the visual arts. Students will research and write knowledgeably on a number of art history topics, reflecting and synthesizing their own theories on the many works they will see in virtual museums and collections.. They will be expected through carefully structured assignments, to exhibit an extensive scholarship in conjunction with these experiences.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Shayla Vines
Wellesley High School


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Course Title: AP® Biology Section BF
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry
Description:
Are you a highly motivated student who is interested in taking a college-level course in Biology? Have you already successfully completed an introductory Biology class and you want to learn more? The Advanced Placement course in Biology is equivalent to a full-year Freshman Biology course taught at any major University. You will be reading the same text that is used at many major colleges and universities, and we will be working at a rigorous pace to cover the material and prepare you for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. Upon successful completion of the exam, you may receive college credit and you will certainly be well-prepared for any Biology course in your future.

This class will build upon your prior knowledge of Biology. We will discuss topics such as molecular genetics, biochemistry, human anatomy and physiology, cell biology, plant biology and ecology. Using your text, the Internet, class discussions, and projects, we will cover a tremendous amount of material in order to give you a complete understanding of the study of biology. Biweekly examinations will test your knowledge of the material as well as prepare you for the AP examination. Due to the volume and level of the material, this course is designed to challenge extremely motivated students who have a strong interest in the Biological Sciences.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Biology can be found here: AP Summer WorkBonnie Ferreira
Apponequet Regional High School


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Course Title: AP® Biology Section KL
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry
Description:
Are you a highly motivated student who is interested in taking a college-level course in Biology? Have you already successfully completed an introductory Biology class and you want to learn more? The Advanced Placement course in Biology is equivalent to a full-year Freshman Biology course taught at any major University. You will be reading the same text that is used at many major colleges and universities, and we will be working at a rigorous pace to cover the material and prepare you for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. Upon successful completion of the exam, you may receive college credit and you will certainly be well-prepared for any Biology course in your future.

This class will build upon your prior knowledge of Biology. We will discuss topics such as molecular genetics, biochemistry, human anatomy and physiology, cell biology, plant biology and ecology. Using your text, the Internet, class discussions, and projects, we will cover a tremendous amount of material in order to give you a complete understanding of the study of biology. Biweekly examinations will test your knowledge of the material as well as prepare you for the AP examination. Due to the volume and level of the material, this course is designed to challenge extremely motivated students who have a strong interest in the Biological Sciences.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Biology can be found here: AP Summer WorkKristin Little
Gloucester City Jr-Sr High School


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Course Title: AP® Calculus AB Section GK
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Four courses of secondary mathematics designed for the college bound student: courses covering algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary functions and their notations. Students should have graphing calculators and access to a scanner..
Description: The first two weeks will be used to introduce the students to each other, the on-line software and the concepts of a VHS workweek. From week 3 on, the students will cover a minimum of two to three sections from the book in a week (depending on scheduled tests and workload), have group and individual homework assignments, and will visit the web to help find resources for answering questions in mathematics. Students will have the opportunity to do some labs that review material and vocabulary from algebra through pre-calculus. In addition, the following Labs will be offered, most as extra assignments for students who have the material in hand and have the time: Golf Balls I, Latitude, All Sports Pass, Coin Tossing, Golf Balls II, Oil Tanks, Conical Drinking Cup, Biorhythms and Powers of Sines and Cosines.

The majority of the work in this class will be homework assignments. This will consist of practice problems where students can access help from other students via established groups, and problems for credit, which is not group work. Each week the students are expected to submit a solution for Question of the Week, an AP Calculus exam question from a previous test. This will acquaint the students with the set up of the exam questions; the vocabulary and time limits imposed for answering AP Calculus exam questions. There are a number of activities to keep the students in touch with each other so they can use the entire knowledge of the class as a resource for answering questions or concerns.

There are several activities to help student search the web to find helpful calculus tutorials. Students will use the web resources they find to help them with problems that require immediate answers. Another activity will have students research the web and identify sites that will be useful for explaining mathematical problems. Through their research on the web, group work and an excellent text the students will be able to build a robust list of resources that will serve them throughout their academic career.

"This course consists of a full high school academic year of work that is comparable to calculus courses taken in college. It is expected that students who take an AP course in Calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both, from institutes of higher learning". This quote and most of the following topics to be discussed come from The College Board's AP Calculus description, commonly called the "acorn book".

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org."Gregory Kirk
McLain High School


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Course Title: AP® Calculus AB Section MC
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Four courses of secondary mathematics designed for the college bound student: courses covering algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary functions and their notations. Students should have graphing calculators and access to a scanner..
Description: The first two weeks will be used to introduce the students to each other, the on-line software and the concepts of a VHS workweek. From week 3 on, the students will cover a minimum of two to three sections from the book in a week (depending on scheduled tests and workload), have group and individual homework assignments, and will visit the web to help find resources for answering questions in mathematics. Students will have the opportunity to do some labs that review material and vocabulary from algebra through pre-calculus. In addition, the following Labs will be offered, most as extra assignments for students who have the material in hand and have the time: Golf Balls I, Latitude, All Sports Pass, Coin Tossing, Golf Balls II, Oil Tanks, Conical Drinking Cup, Biorhythms and Powers of Sines and Cosines.

The majority of the work in this class will be homework assignments. This will consist of practice problems where students can access help from other students via established groups, and problems for credit, which is not group work. Each week the students are expected to submit a solution for Question of the Week, an AP Calculus exam question from a previous test. This will acquaint the students with the set up of the exam questions; the vocabulary and time limits imposed for answering AP Calculus exam questions. There are a number of activities to keep the students in touch with each other so they can use the entire knowledge of the class as a resource for answering questions or concerns.

There are several activities to help student search the web to find helpful calculus tutorials. Students will use the web resources they find to help them with problems that require immediate answers. Another activity will have students research the web and identify sites that will be useful for explaining mathematical problems. Through their research on the web, group work and an excellent text the students will be able to build a robust list of resources that will serve them throughout their academic career.

"This course consists of a full high school academic year of work that is comparable to calculus courses taken in college. It is expected that students who take an AP course in Calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both, from institutes of higher learning". This quote and most of the following topics to be discussed come from The College Board's AP Calculus description, commonly called the "acorn book".

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org."Maureen Connolly
Holy Name High School MA


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Calculus AB Section MN
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Four courses of secondary mathematics designed for the college bound student: courses covering algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary functions and their notations. Students should have graphing calculators and access to a scanner..
Description: The first two weeks will be used to introduce the students to each other, the on-line software and the concepts of a VHS workweek. From week 3 on, the students will cover a minimum of two to three sections from the book in a week (depending on scheduled tests and workload), have group and individual homework assignments, and will visit the web to help find resources for answering questions in mathematics. Students will have the opportunity to do some labs that review material and vocabulary from algebra through pre-calculus. In addition, the following Labs will be offered, most as extra assignments for students who have the material in hand and have the time: Golf Balls I, Latitude, All Sports Pass, Coin Tossing, Golf Balls II, Oil Tanks, Conical Drinking Cup, Biorhythms and Powers of Sines and Cosines.

The majority of the work in this class will be homework assignments. This will consist of practice problems where students can access help from other students via established groups, and problems for credit, which is not group work. Each week the students are expected to submit a solution for Question of the Week, an AP Calculus exam question from a previous test. This will acquaint the students with the set up of the exam questions; the vocabulary and time limits imposed for answering AP Calculus exam questions. There are a number of activities to keep the students in touch with each other so they can use the entire knowledge of the class as a resource for answering questions or concerns.

There are several activities to help student search the web to find helpful calculus tutorials. Students will use the web resources they find to help them with problems that require immediate answers. Another activity will have students research the web and identify sites that will be useful for explaining mathematical problems. Through their research on the web, group work and an excellent text the students will be able to build a robust list of resources that will serve them throughout their academic career.

"This course consists of a full high school academic year of work that is comparable to calculus courses taken in college. It is expected that students who take an AP course in Calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both, from institutes of higher learning". This quote and most of the following topics to be discussed come from The College Board's AP Calculus description, commonly called the "acorn book".

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org."Maribeth Nyce
Millbury Jr./Sr. High School


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Course Title: AP® Calculus BC Section GK
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Four courses of secondary mathematics designed for the college bound student: courses covering algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary functions and their notations. Students should have graphing calculators, access to a scanner and access to MS PowerPoint or a PowerPoint Viewer.
Description: The VHS AP Calculus BC course is a full academic-year course. It is a challenging course designed for high school students who have completed four years of secondary mathematics courses such as Algebra, Geometry, Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (which includes some Analytic Geometry and elementary functions). Work is comparable to that required in most college and university Calculus courses. Students should plan on taking the AP Calculus BC exam offered in May. Successful completion of the AP Exam may provide students with the opportunity to receive college credit.

The AP Calculus BC course covers all topics in the AP Calculus AB course plus the following additional topics:
Parametric, polar and vector functions
Slope Fields
Euler's method
L'Hopital's Rule
Improper Integrals
Logistic differential equations
Polynomial approximations and Series
Taylor Series

Emphasis is on conceptual understanding. However, facility with manipulation and computational skills are important outcomes. Students should expect the course as well as the AP Exam to truly push the depth of their understanding of mathematics generally and calculus specifically. Areas of emphasis From the College Board’s online resourse for AP Calculus at http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/repository/ap03_cd_calculus_0405_4313.pdf
-Students should be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal. They should understand the connections among these representations.
-Students should understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and should be able to use derivatives to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

Students will be expected to complete daily/weekly assignments and regular quizzes and exams. Each student will need a graphing calculator such as the TI-83 or equivalent and knowledge on how to work with their calculator. As in most online courses the student will be required to do a significant amount of independent learning. Individual responsibility, good work habits, discipline and organization will be important attributes for success.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Gregory Kirk
Virtual High School


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Course Title: AP® Calculus BC Section JV
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Four courses of secondary mathematics designed for the college bound student: courses covering algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary functions and their notations. Students should have graphing calculators, access to a scanner and access to MS PowerPoint or a PowerPoint Viewer.
Description: The VHS AP Calculus BC course is a full academic-year course. It is a challenging course designed for high school students who have completed four years of secondary mathematics courses such as Algebra, Geometry, Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (which includes some Analytic Geometry and elementary functions). Work is comparable to that required in most college and university Calculus courses. Students should plan on taking the AP Calculus BC exam offered in May. Successful completion of the AP Exam may provide students with the opportunity to receive college credit.

The AP Calculus BC course covers all topics in the AP Calculus AB course plus the following additional topics:
Parametric, polar and vector functions
Slope Fields
Euler's method
L'Hopital's Rule
Improper Integrals
Logistic differential equations
Polynomial approximations and Series
Taylor Series

Emphasis is on conceptual understanding. However, facility with manipulation and computational skills are important outcomes. Students should expect the course as well as the AP Exam to truly push the depth of their understanding of mathematics generally and calculus specifically. Areas of emphasis From the College Board’s online resourse for AP Calculus at http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/repository/ap03_cd_calculus_0405_4313.pdf
-Students should be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal. They should understand the connections among these representations.
-Students should understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and should be able to use derivatives to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

Students will be expected to complete daily/weekly assignments and regular quizzes and exams. Each student will need a graphing calculator such as the TI-83 or equivalent and knowledge on how to work with their calculator. As in most online courses the student will be required to do a significant amount of independent learning. Individual responsibility, good work habits, discipline and organization will be important attributes for success.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Joseph Vallone
Incarnate Word Academy


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Course Title: AP® Calculus BC Section MT
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Four courses of secondary mathematics designed for the college bound student: courses covering algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary functions and their notations. Students should have graphing calculators, access to a scanner and access to MS PowerPoint or a PowerPoint Viewer.
Description: The VHS AP Calculus BC course is a full academic-year course. It is a challenging course designed for high school students who have completed four years of secondary mathematics courses such as Algebra, Geometry, Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (which includes some Analytic Geometry and elementary functions). Work is comparable to that required in most college and university Calculus courses. Students should plan on taking the AP Calculus BC exam offered in May. Successful completion of the AP Exam may provide students with the opportunity to receive college credit.

The AP Calculus BC course covers all topics in the AP Calculus AB course plus the following additional topics:
Parametric, polar and vector functions
Slope Fields
Euler's method
L'Hopital's Rule
Improper Integrals
Logistic differential equations
Polynomial approximations and Series
Taylor Series

Emphasis is on conceptual understanding. However, facility with manipulation and computational skills are important outcomes. Students should expect the course as well as the AP Exam to truly push the depth of their understanding of mathematics generally and calculus specifically. Areas of emphasis From the College Board’s online resourse for AP Calculus at http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/repository/ap03_cd_calculus_0405_4313.pdf
-Students should be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal. They should understand the connections among these representations.
-Students should understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and should be able to use derivatives to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

Students will be expected to complete daily/weekly assignments and regular quizzes and exams. Each student will need a graphing calculator such as the TI-83 or equivalent and knowledge on how to work with their calculator. As in most online courses the student will be required to do a significant amount of independent learning. Individual responsibility, good work habits, discipline and organization will be important attributes for success.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Marc Tintorer
David Brearley High School


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Course Title: AP® Calculus BC Section MW
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Four courses of secondary mathematics designed for the college bound student: courses covering algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary functions and their notations. Students should have graphing calculators, access to a scanner and access to MS PowerPoint or a PowerPoint Viewer.
Description: The VHS AP Calculus BC course is a full academic-year course. It is a challenging course designed for high school students who have completed four years of secondary mathematics courses such as Algebra, Geometry, Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (which includes some Analytic Geometry and elementary functions). Work is comparable to that required in most college and university Calculus courses. Students should plan on taking the AP Calculus BC exam offered in May. Successful completion of the AP Exam may provide students with the opportunity to receive college credit.

The AP Calculus BC course covers all topics in the AP Calculus AB course plus the following additional topics:
Parametric, polar and vector functions
Slope Fields
Euler's method
L'Hopital's Rule
Improper Integrals
Logistic differential equations
Polynomial approximations and Series
Taylor Series

Emphasis is on conceptual understanding. However, facility with manipulation and computational skills are important outcomes. Students should expect the course as well as the AP Exam to truly push the depth of their understanding of mathematics generally and calculus specifically. Areas of emphasis From the College Board’s online resourse for AP Calculus at http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/repository/ap03_cd_calculus_0405_4313.pdf
-Students should be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal. They should understand the connections among these representations.
-Students should understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and should be able to use derivatives to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

Students will be expected to complete daily/weekly assignments and regular quizzes and exams. Each student will need a graphing calculator such as the TI-83 or equivalent and knowledge on how to work with their calculator. As in most online courses the student will be required to do a significant amount of independent learning. Individual responsibility, good work habits, discipline and organization will be important attributes for success.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Matthew Whitney
South Hadley High School


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Course Title: AP® Calculus BC Section PA
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Four courses of secondary mathematics designed for the college bound student: courses covering algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, elementary functions and their notations. Students should have graphing calculators, access to a scanner and access to MS PowerPoint or a PowerPoint Viewer.
Description: The VHS AP Calculus BC course is a full academic-year course. It is a challenging course designed for high school students who have completed four years of secondary mathematics courses such as Algebra, Geometry, Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (which includes some Analytic Geometry and elementary functions). Work is comparable to that required in most college and university Calculus courses. Students should plan on taking the AP Calculus BC exam offered in May. Successful completion of the AP Exam may provide students with the opportunity to receive college credit.

The AP Calculus BC course covers all topics in the AP Calculus AB course plus the following additional topics:
Parametric, polar and vector functions
Slope Fields
Euler's method
L'Hopital's Rule
Improper Integrals
Logistic differential equations
Polynomial approximations and Series
Taylor Series

Emphasis is on conceptual understanding. However, facility with manipulation and computational skills are important outcomes. Students should expect the course as well as the AP Exam to truly push the depth of their understanding of mathematics generally and calculus specifically. Areas of emphasis From the College Board’s online resourse for AP Calculus at http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/repository/ap03_cd_calculus_0405_4313.pdf
-Students should be able to work with functions represented in a variety of ways: graphical, numerical, analytical, or verbal. They should understand the connections among these representations.
-Students should understand the meaning of the derivative in terms of a rate of change and local linear approximation and should be able to use derivatives to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the meaning of the definite integral both as a limit of Riemann sums and as the net accumulation of change and should be able to use integrals to solve a variety of problems.
-Students should understand the relationship between the derivative and the definite integral as expressed in both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

Students will be expected to complete daily/weekly assignments and regular quizzes and exams. Each student will need a graphing calculator such as the TI-83 or equivalent and knowledge on how to work with their calculator. As in most online courses the student will be required to do a significant amount of independent learning. Individual responsibility, good work habits, discipline and organization will be important attributes for success.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Peter Atlas
Concord-Carlisle High School


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Course Title: AP® Computer Science A Section BM
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Windows machine is required with: Microsoft Word, Acrobat Reader, and WinZip available. Downloading and installation of Java programming environment will be assigned in Week 2 of this course, and may require extensive local tech support.
Some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.
Description: Advanced Placement Computer Science is designed to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam A. The course is a project-oriented study of computer science using the Java programming language.

In this course you can look forward to developing algorithms, mastering a subset of the Java language, exploring object-oriented design, and being exposed to GUI and applet development.

Each student should be prepared to function as a logical thinker with a willingness to devote ample time to developing solutions to complex challenges. Projects in the course demand a thoughtful and organized approach to problem solving as well as a strong attention to precise detail and the time necessary to experiment with possible solutions.

But, more than that, it should be noted that this is a serious hands-on programming course. It is designed to present you with the volume, pace and complexity of material required to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam in the Spring. It is the equivalent of an honors level course.

Projects involve terminology and a way of organizing thoughts that are peculiar to coding. And those same projects require the mastery of the intricacies of object-oriented programming, including such concepts as data typing and structuring, string manipulation, conditional predicate logic, recursion, parameter passing, array sorting, and inheritance.

For all of these reasons:

- the course moves quickly
- there are a lot of concepts to cover and a lot of skills to master
- the requirements for passing the AP Comp Sci test are significant

some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.

This can take the form of self-study in programming concepts, experience in coding (in any language), or the completion of a previous computer course that covered the essential elements of programming.

This course can open up a new world of ideas, initiate you into a fascinating global subculture, and expose you to a remarkable pattern of thinking that can be useful in other parts of your life. But some prior preparation for immersion in this world is highly recommended.

*** Note: Before enrolling in this course please read the VHS AP Course PolicyBarbara Mckeon
Virtual High School


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Course Title: AP® Computer Science A Section DC
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Windows machine is required with: Microsoft Word, Acrobat Reader, and WinZip available. Downloading and installation of Java programming environment will be assigned in Week 2 of this course, and may require extensive local tech support.
Some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.
Description: Advanced Placement Computer Science is designed to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam A. The course is a project-oriented study of computer science using the Java programming language.

In this course you can look forward to developing algorithms, mastering a subset of the Java language, exploring object-oriented design, and being exposed to GUI and applet development.

Each student should be prepared to function as a logical thinker with a willingness to devote ample time to developing solutions to complex challenges. Projects in the course demand a thoughtful and organized approach to problem solving as well as a strong attention to precise detail and the time necessary to experiment with possible solutions.

But, more than that, it should be noted that this is a serious hands-on programming course. It is designed to present you with the volume, pace and complexity of material required to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam in the Spring. It is the equivalent of an honors level course.

Projects involve terminology and a way of organizing thoughts that are peculiar to coding. And those same projects require the mastery of the intricacies of object-oriented programming, including such concepts as data typing and structuring, string manipulation, conditional predicate logic, recursion, parameter passing, array sorting, and inheritance.

For all of these reasons:

- the course moves quickly
- there are a lot of concepts to cover and a lot of skills to master
- the requirements for passing the AP Comp Sci test are significant

some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.

This can take the form of self-study in programming concepts, experience in coding (in any language), or the completion of a previous computer course that covered the essential elements of programming.

This course can open up a new world of ideas, initiate you into a fascinating global subculture, and expose you to a remarkable pattern of thinking that can be useful in other parts of your life. But some prior preparation for immersion in this world is highly recommended.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Dawn Caissie
Lowell Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Computer Science A Section DP
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Windows machine is required with: Microsoft Word, Acrobat Reader, and WinZip available. Downloading and installation of Java programming environment will be assigned in Week 2 of this course, and may require extensive local tech support.
Some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.
Description: Advanced Placement Computer Science is designed to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam A. The course is a project-oriented study of computer science using the Java programming language.

In this course you can look forward to developing algorithms, mastering a subset of the Java language, exploring object-oriented design, and being exposed to GUI and applet development.

Each student should be prepared to function as a logical thinker with a willingness to devote ample time to developing solutions to complex challenges. Projects in the course demand a thoughtful and organized approach to problem solving as well as a strong attention to precise detail and the time necessary to experiment with possible solutions.

But, more than that, it should be noted that this is a serious hands-on programming course. It is designed to present you with the volume, pace and complexity of material required to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam in the Spring. It is the equivalent of an honors level course.

Projects involve terminology and a way of organizing thoughts that are peculiar to coding. And those same projects require the mastery of the intricacies of object-oriented programming, including such concepts as data typing and structuring, string manipulation, conditional predicate logic, recursion, parameter passing, array sorting, and inheritance.

For all of these reasons:

- the course moves quickly
- there are a lot of concepts to cover and a lot of skills to master
- the requirements for passing the AP Comp Sci test are significant

some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.

This can take the form of self-study in programming concepts, experience in coding (in any language), or the completion of a previous computer course that covered the essential elements of programming.

This course can open up a new world of ideas, initiate you into a fascinating global subculture, and expose you to a remarkable pattern of thinking that can be useful in other parts of your life. But some prior preparation for immersion in this world is highly recommended.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Diana Perea
St. Pius X High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Computer Science A Section LM
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Windows machine is required with: Microsoft Word, Acrobat Reader, and WinZip available. Downloading and installation of Java programming environment will be assigned in Week 2 of this course, and may require extensive local tech support.
Some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.
Description: Advanced Placement Computer Science is designed to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam A. The course is a project-oriented study of computer science using the Java programming language.

In this course you can look forward to developing algorithms, mastering a subset of the Java language, exploring object-oriented design, and being exposed to GUI and applet development.

Each student should be prepared to function as a logical thinker with a willingness to devote ample time to developing solutions to complex challenges. Projects in the course demand a thoughtful and organized approach to problem solving as well as a strong attention to precise detail and the time necessary to experiment with possible solutions.

But, more than that, it should be noted that this is a serious hands-on programming course. It is designed to present you with the volume, pace and complexity of material required to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam in the Spring. It is the equivalent of an honors level course.

Projects involve terminology and a way of organizing thoughts that are peculiar to coding. And those same projects require the mastery of the intricacies of object-oriented programming, including such concepts as data typing and structuring, string manipulation, conditional predicate logic, recursion, parameter passing, array sorting, and inheritance.

For all of these reasons:

- the course moves quickly
- there are a lot of concepts to cover and a lot of skills to master
- the requirements for passing the AP Comp Sci test are significant

some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.

This can take the form of self-study in programming concepts, experience in coding (in any language), or the completion of a previous computer course that covered the essential elements of programming.

This course can open up a new world of ideas, initiate you into a fascinating global subculture, and expose you to a remarkable pattern of thinking that can be useful in other parts of your life. But some prior preparation for immersion in this world is highly recommended.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Linda D. Mchugh
Dracut High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Computer Science A Section LS
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Windows machine is required with: Microsoft Word, Acrobat Reader, and WinZip available. Downloading and installation of Java programming environment will be assigned in Week 2 of this course, and may require extensive local tech support.
Some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.
Description: Advanced Placement Computer Science is designed to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam A. The course is a project-oriented study of computer science using the Java programming language.

In this course you can look forward to developing algorithms, mastering a subset of the Java language, exploring object-oriented design, and being exposed to GUI and applet development.

Each student should be prepared to function as a logical thinker with a willingness to devote ample time to developing solutions to complex challenges. Projects in the course demand a thoughtful and organized approach to problem solving as well as a strong attention to precise detail and the time necessary to experiment with possible solutions.

But, more than that, it should be noted that this is a serious hands-on programming course. It is designed to present you with the volume, pace and complexity of material required to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam in the Spring. It is the equivalent of an honors level course.

Projects involve terminology and a way of organizing thoughts that are peculiar to coding. And those same projects require the mastery of the intricacies of object-oriented programming, including such concepts as data typing and structuring, string manipulation, conditional predicate logic, recursion, parameter passing, array sorting, and inheritance.

For all of these reasons:

- the course moves quickly
- there are a lot of concepts to cover and a lot of skills to master
- the requirements for passing the AP Comp Sci test are significant

some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.

This can take the form of self-study in programming concepts, experience in coding (in any language), or the completion of a previous computer course that covered the essential elements of programming.

This course can open up a new world of ideas, initiate you into a fascinating global subculture, and expose you to a remarkable pattern of thinking that can be useful in other parts of your life. But some prior preparation for immersion in this world is highly recommended.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Linda Stanley
Woonsocket High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Computer Science A Section WS
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Windows machine is required with: Microsoft Word, Acrobat Reader, and WinZip available. Downloading and installation of Java programming environment will be assigned in Week 2 of this course, and may require extensive local tech support.
Some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.
Description: Advanced Placement Computer Science is designed to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam A. The course is a project-oriented study of computer science using the Java programming language.

In this course you can look forward to developing algorithms, mastering a subset of the Java language, exploring object-oriented design, and being exposed to GUI and applet development.

Each student should be prepared to function as a logical thinker with a willingness to devote ample time to developing solutions to complex challenges. Projects in the course demand a thoughtful and organized approach to problem solving as well as a strong attention to precise detail and the time necessary to experiment with possible solutions.

But, more than that, it should be noted that this is a serious hands-on programming course. It is designed to present you with the volume, pace and complexity of material required to prepare you for the AP Computer Science Exam in the Spring. It is the equivalent of an honors level course.

Projects involve terminology and a way of organizing thoughts that are peculiar to coding. And those same projects require the mastery of the intricacies of object-oriented programming, including such concepts as data typing and structuring, string manipulation, conditional predicate logic, recursion, parameter passing, array sorting, and inheritance.

For all of these reasons:

- the course moves quickly
- there are a lot of concepts to cover and a lot of skills to master
- the requirements for passing the AP Comp Sci test are significant

some prior exposure to computer programming is recommended before enrolling.

This can take the form of self-study in programming concepts, experience in coding (in any language), or the completion of a previous computer course that covered the essential elements of programming.

This course can open up a new world of ideas, initiate you into a fascinating global subculture, and expose you to a remarkable pattern of thinking that can be useful in other parts of your life. But some prior preparation for immersion in this world is highly recommended.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.William Sanford
New Britain High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Economics Section CB2: Micro and Macro
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: We will be reading a minimum of one chapter per week in an AP textbook. If you are unfamiliar with AP materials, these are college textbooks. Basic mathematics and graphing skills required. Active participation is a big part of this course; your active participation, especially. Being self motivated and able to work in small groups is also a plus.
Description: Economics is a social science which addresses how society allocates (distributes) limited resources (e.g. - goods and services). It is a “science” because it is governed by quantifiable laws designed to predict likely outcomes. It is a “social” science, as opposed to a natural science, because its laws are based upon social, as opposed to natural occurrences. This course will prepare the student for both the AP Micro and Macroeconomics exams. Each exam consists of 60 multiple choice questions and three free-response essay questions. More than 2800 colleges and universities give credit for passing the AP exam, enabling the student to move on to more advanced level courses. Students taking AP courses in VHS are required to take their respective AP exams in May.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Charlie Burnett
Essex High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Economics Section GT: Micro and Macro
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: We will be reading a minimum of one chapter per week in an AP textbook. If you are unfamiliar with AP materials, these are college textbooks. Basic mathematics and graphing skills required. Active participation is a big part of this course; your active participation, especially. Being self motivated and able to work in small groups is also a plus.
Description: Economics is a social science which addresses how society allocates (distributes) limited resources (e.g. - goods and services). It is a “science” because it is governed by quantifiable laws designed to predict likely outcomes. It is a “social” science, as opposed to a natural science, because its laws are based upon social, as opposed to natural occurrences. This course will prepare the student for both the AP Micro and Macroeconomics exams. Each exam consists of 60 multiple choice questions and three free-response essay questions. More than 2800 colleges and universities give credit for passing the AP exam, enabling the student to move on to more advanced level courses. Students taking AP courses in VHS are required to take their respective AP exams in May.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Glenn Tracey
Greely High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Economics Section GT2: Micro and Macro
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: We will be reading a minimum of one chapter per week in an AP textbook. If you are unfamiliar with AP materials, these are college textbooks. Basic mathematics and graphing skills required. Active participation is a big part of this course; your active participation, especially. Being self motivated and able to work in small groups is also a plus.
Description: Economics is a social science which addresses how society allocates (distributes) limited resources (e.g. - goods and services). It is a “science” because it is governed by quantifiable laws designed to predict likely outcomes. It is a “social” science, as opposed to a natural science, because its laws are based upon social, as opposed to natural occurrences. This course will prepare the student for both the AP Micro and Macroeconomics exams. Each exam consists of 60 multiple choice questions and three free-response essay questions. More than 2800 colleges and universities give credit for passing the AP exam, enabling the student to move on to more advanced level courses. Students taking AP courses in VHS are required to take their respective AP exams in May.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Glenn Tracey
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Economics Section JG: Micro and Macro
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: We will be reading a minimum of one chapter per week in an AP textbook. If you are unfamiliar with AP materials, these are college textbooks. Basic mathematics and graphing skills required. Active participation is a big part of this course; your active participation, especially. Being self motivated and able to work in small groups is also a plus.
Description: Economics is a social science which addresses how society allocates (distributes) limited resources (e.g. - goods and services). It is a “science” because it is governed by quantifiable laws designed to predict likely outcomes. It is a “social” science, as opposed to a natural science, because its laws are based upon social, as opposed to natural occurrences. This course will prepare the student for both the AP Micro and Macroeconomics exams. Each exam consists of 60 multiple choice questions and three free-response essay questions. More than 2800 colleges and universities give credit for passing the AP exam, enabling the student to move on to more advanced level courses. Students taking AP courses in VHS are required to take their respective AP exams in May.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Jamie Green
Malden High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Economics Section JK1: Micro and Macro
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: We will be reading a minimum of one chapter per week in an AP textbook. If you are unfamiliar with AP materials, these are college textbooks. Basic mathematics and graphing skills required. Active participation is a big part of this course; your active participation, especially. Being self motivated and able to work in small groups is also a plus.
Description: Economics is a social science which addresses how society allocates (distributes) limited resources (e.g. - goods and services). It is a “science” because it is governed by quantifiable laws designed to predict likely outcomes. It is a “social” science, as opposed to a natural science, because its laws are based upon social, as opposed to natural occurrences. This course will prepare the student for both the AP Micro and Macroeconomics exams. Each exam consists of 60 multiple choice questions and three free-response essay questions. More than 2800 colleges and universities give credit for passing the AP exam, enabling the student to move on to more advanced level courses. Students taking AP courses in VHS are required to take their respective AP exams in May.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Jean Kiekel
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Economics Section JK2: Micro and Macro
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Good reading ability is a must. We will be reading a minimum of one chapter per week in an AP textbook. If you are unfamiliar with AP materials, these are college textbooks. Basic mathematics and graphing skills required. Active participation is a big part of this course; your active participation, especially. Being self motivated and able to work in small groups is also a plus.
Description: Economics is a social science which addresses how society allocates (distributes) limited resources (e.g. - goods and services). It is a “science” because it is governed by quantifiable laws designed to predict likely outcomes. It is a “social” science, as opposed to a natural science, because its laws are based upon social, as opposed to natural occurrences. This course will prepare the student for both the AP Micro and Macroeconomics exams. Each exam consists of 60 multiple choice questions and three free-response essay questions. More than 2800 colleges and universities give credit for passing the AP exam, enabling the student to move on to more advanced level courses. Students taking AP courses in VHS are required to take their respective AP exams in May.

WARNING: THIS COURSE COULD BE DANGEROUS TO YOUR THINKING THAT BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT ARE HERE TO HELP YOU.

*** Note: Before enrolling in this course please read the VHS AP Course PolicyJean Kiekel
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Economics Section MA: Micro and Macro
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Good reading ability is a must. We will be reading a minimum of one chapter per week in an AP textbook. If you are unfamiliar with AP materials, these are college textbooks. Basic mathematics and graphing skills required. Active participation is a big part of this course; your active participation, especially. Being self motivated and able to work in small groups is also a plus.
Description: Economics is a social science which addresses how society allocates (distributes) limited resources (e.g. - goods and services). It is a “science” because it is governed by quantifiable laws designed to predict likely outcomes. It is a “social” science, as opposed to a natural science, because its laws are based upon social, as opposed to natural occurrences. This course will prepare the student for both the AP Micro and Macroeconomics exams. Each exam consists of 60 multiple choice questions and three free-response essay questions. More than 2800 colleges and universities give credit for passing the AP exam, enabling the student to move on to more advanced level courses. Students taking AP courses in VHS are required to take their respective AP exams in May.

WARNING: THIS COURSE COULD BE DANGEROUS TO YOUR THINKING THAT BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT ARE HERE TO HELP YOU.

*** Note: Before enrolling in this course please read the VHS AP Course PolicyMark Alessandri
Carver Public Schools


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® English Language and Composition Private Offering HHS
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

The AP® English Language and Composition course is devoted to the study of argument and persuasion or what has traditionally been called rhetoric. The course is intended to help students become effective readers and writers. The goal is to understand how messages are conveyed and arguments are structured. Because most media is at some level rhetorical, that is it has a point of view the reader, viewer, or listener is expected to accept, it is important to recognize how our view of the world is being shaped by what we read, view, or hear. It is also important that as writers we understand how best to communicate our own point of view in a way that others will find reasonable even if they do not agree. The purpose of this course is to allow students to explore how to express reasonable points of view and to communicate views effectively.

The AP® Language and Composition test assesses a student's ability to recognize how arguments are made, the audiences to whom they are made, and the author's purpose in making those arguments. The test also expects that students will be able to recognize the rhetorical tricks of the trade an author employs to convey the argument and make it more agreeable to the reader. It is expected that the student will be able to identify the stylistic devices that characterize a writer's work, at least in a given passage. Stylistic analysis is probably the aspect of the Language and Composition course that is most like traditional literary analysis; this is where students focus on elements in a text such as imagery, metaphor, and allusion. It is important to remember that style is often a writer's fingerprint. Instead of looking at the literary devices employed by a text to understand how they help to tell a story, we will be looking at them to understand how they define a writer's unique style and how a writer uses style to shape an argument. The test also asks students to construct their own argument defending a point of view in regards to an issue.

This AP® English Language & Composition course is a virtual course, which meets through threaded discussion, as opposed to “real time” discussions/meetings. Students work independently, collaboratively in small groups, and as a whole class, as well as one on one with the teacher, all through discussion threads devoted to these activities. The course is 33 weeks long, with a Wednesday through Tuesday course week. The syllabus is divided into quarters, with overarching themes for semester one and semester two.
Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® English Language and Composition Section CG
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students will be expected to acquire the following novels for this class:
The Handmaid's Tale
Their Eyes Were Watching God
Fast Food Nation
The Things They Carried
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
These books can be found at a local or school library or can be purchased through Amazon for a few dollars each. Questions or concerns about this should be directed to the course instructor once the course has begun. Other inquiries can be submitted via Service Ticket (http://service.goVHS.org).

In addition, The Bedford Reader will be provided within the course in PDF format. Any student who desires a hard-copy of this textbook will need to purchase it individually.
Description: The AP® English Language and Composition course is devoted to the study of argument and persuasion or what has traditionally been called rhetoric. The course is intended to help students become effective readers and writers. The goal is to understand how messages are conveyed and arguments are structured. Because most media is at some level rhetorical, that is it has a point of view the reader, viewer, or listener is expected to accept, it is important to recognize how our view of the world is being shaped by what we read, view, or hear. It is also important that as writers we understand how best to communicate our own point of view in a way that others will find reasonable even if they do not agree. The purpose of this course is to allow students to explore how to express reasonable points of view and to communicate views effectively.

The AP® Language and Composition test assesses a student's ability to recognize how arguments are made, the audiences to whom they are made, and the author's purpose in making those arguments. The test also expects that students will be able to recognize the rhetorical tricks of the trade an author employs to convey the argument and make it more agreeable to the reader. It is expected that the student will be able to identify the stylistic devices that characterize a writer's work, at least in a given passage. Stylistic analysis is probably the aspect of the Language and Composition course that is most like traditional literary analysis; this is where students focus on elements in a text such as imagery, metaphor, and allusion. It is important to remember that style is often a writer's fingerprint. Instead of looking at the literary devices employed by a text to understand how they help to tell a story, we will be looking at them to understand how they define a writer's unique style and how a writer uses style to shape an argument. The test also asks students to construct their own argument defending a point of view in regards to an issue.

This AP® English Language & Composition course is a virtual course, which meets through threaded discussion, as opposed to “real time” discussions/meetings. Students work independently, collaboratively in small groups, and as a whole class, as well as one on one with the teacher, all through discussion threads devoted to these activities. The course is 33 weeks long, with a Wednesday through Tuesday course week. The syllabus is divided into quarters, with overarching themes for semester one and semester two.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP English Language can be found here: AP Summer WorkCharlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® English Language and Composition Section VM
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students will be expected to acquire the following novels for this class:
The Handmaid's Tale
Their Eyes Were Watching God
Fast Food Nation
The Things They Carried
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
These books can be found at a local or school library or can be purchased through Amazon for a few dollars each. Questions or concerns about this should be directed to the course instructor once the course has begun. Other inquiries can be submitted via Service Ticket (http://service.goVHS.org).

In addition, The Bedford Reader will be provided within the course in PDF format. Any student who desires a hard-copy of this textbook will need to purchase it individually.
Description: The AP English Language and Composition course is devoted to the study of argument and persuasion or what has traditionally been called rhetoric. The course is intended to help students become effective readers and writers. The goal is to understand how messages are conveyed and arguments are structured. Because most media is at some level rhetorical, that is it has a point of view the reader, viewer, or listener is expected to accept, it is important to recognize how our view of the world is being shaped by what we read, view, or hear. It is also important that as writers we understand how best to communicate our own point of view in a way that others will find reasonable even if they do not agree. The purpose of this course is to allow students to explore how to express reasonable points of view and to communicate views effectively.

The A. P. Language and Composition test assesses a student's ability to recognize how arguments are made, the audiences to whom they are made, and the author's purpose in making those arguments. The test also expects that students will be able to recognize the rhetorical tricks of the trade an author employs to convey the argument and make it more agreeable to the reader. It is expected that the student will be able to identify the stylistic devices that characterize a writer's work, at least in a given passage. Stylistic analysis is probably the aspect of the Language and Composition course that is most like traditional literary analysis; this is where students focus on elements in a text such as imagery, metaphor, and allusion. It is important to remember that style is often a writer's fingerprint. Instead of looking at the literary devices employed by a text to understand how they help to tell a story, we will be looking at them to understand how they define a writer's unique style and how a writer uses style to shape an argument. The test also asks students to construct their own argument defending a point of view in regards to an issue.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.
This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP English Language can be found here: AP Summer WorkValerie Mattessich
Pascack Valley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® English Literature and Composition Section LH
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students will be expected to acquire the following novels for this class:
The Good Earth
The Bean Trees
The Secret Life of Bees
One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest
Our Town
The Awakening
Their Eyes Were Watching God
Death of a Saleman
These books can be found at a local or school library or can be purchased through Amazon for a few dollars each. Questions or concerns about this should be directed to the course instructor once the course has begun. Other inquiries can be submitted via Service Ticket (http://service.goVHS.org).
Description: This course is designed to promote the love of literature and to engage students to become independent thinkers and skillful writers. By using major works from different literary periods, this year long course focuses on a variety of genres. This includes the short story, the novel, drama and poetry.

This course requires extensive reading assignments to promote close and analytical interpretation of the text. It also includes challenging writing assignments, generally 3-5 pages in length, to foster strong organizational skills with attention to form, style, and structure as well as content. Some research is included.

Finally, class discussion is a major component of this course. We are a community of learners and teachers and it is important that we "hear" one another's voice. Everyone is expected to participate fully.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP English Literature can be found here: AP Summer WorkLani Hofacket
Deming High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® English Literature and Composition Section LM
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students will be expected to acquire the following novels for this class:
The Good Earth
The Bean Trees
The Secret Life of Bees
One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest
Our Town
The Awakening
Their Eyes Were Watching God
Death of a Saleman
These books can be found at a local or school library or can be purchased through Amazon for a few dollars each. Questions or concerns about this should be directed to the course instructor once the course has begun. Other inquiries can be submitted via Service Ticket (http://service.goVHS.org).
Description: This course is designed to promote the love of literature and to engage students to become independent thinkers and skillful writers. By using major works from different literary periods, this year long course focuses on a variety of genres. This includes the short story, the novel, drama and poetry.

This course requires extensive reading assignments to promote close and analytical interpretation of the text. It also includes challenging writing assignments, generally 3-5 pages in length, to foster strong organizational skills with attention to form, style, and structure as well as content. Some research is included.

Finally, class discussion is a major component of this course. We are a community of learners and teachers and it is important that we "hear" one another's voice. Everyone is expected to participate fully.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP English Literature can be found here: AP Summer WorkLaura Mazzola
Traip Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® English Literature and Composition Section SH
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students will be expected to acquire the following novels for this class:
The Good Earth
The Bean Trees
The Secret Life of Bees
One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest
Our Town
The Awakening
Their Eyes Were Watching God
Death of a Saleman
These books can be found at a local or school library or can be purchased through Amazon for a few dollars each. Questions or concerns about this should be directed to the course instructor once the course has begun. Other inquiries can be submitted via Service Ticket (http://service.goVHS.org).
Description: This course is designed to promote the love of literature and to engage students to become independent thinkers and skillful writers. By using major works from different literary periods, this year long course focuses on a variety of genres. This includes the short story, the novel, drama and poetry.

This course requires extensive reading assignments to promote close and analytical interpretation of the text. It also includes challenging writing assignments, generally 3-5 pages in length, to foster strong organizational skills with attention to form, style, and structure as well as content. Some research is included.

Finally, class discussion is a major component of this course. We are a community of learners and teachers and it is important that we "hear" one another's voice. Everyone is expected to participate fully.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP English Literature can be found here: AP Summer WorkSusan Hardin
Petersburg High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Environmental Science Section CN
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One full academic year of both high school-level biology and chemistry. Materials Provided: Some basic lab supplies (thermometer; magnifying lens).

Students will need access to both a scanner and a digital camera to complete assignments for this course. The scanner is needed only occasionally, but the digital camera will be used every couple of weeks.
Description: This full year AP environmental science class is equivalent to an introductory, one semester, college level, environmental science class. If you have successfully completed both high school level biology and chemistry, if you are interested in the environment and, if you are looking for a challenge, this course might be for you! Because this is a college level course, be ready to commit time to your study. This course will cover concepts in ecology, geology, sociology, economics, biology, and chemistry, that will further your understanding of how humans can live sustainably. Integrated in the course is a field study component which will improve your observational skills, allow you to develop and conduct well-designed experiments, and provide opportunity to interpret and share your observations, results and conclusions with your classmates. You will be applying concepts learned in the weekly lessons to your local field study, as well as collaborating with your classmates regularly on case studies and local environmental concerns to gain a global perspective on environmental issues. During the second semester you will engage in an independent research project which culminates in a project showcase where you will present your research to your classmates.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Environmental Science can be found here: AP Summer WorkCatherine Niedziela
Hopkins Academy


* - - - *,
Course Title: AP® Environmental Science Section CN
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One full academic year of both high school-level biology and chemistry. Materials Provided: Some basic lab supplies (thermometer; magnifying lens).

Students will need access to both a scanner and a digital camera to complete assignments for this course. The scanner is needed only occasionally, but the digital camera will be used every couple of weeks.
Description: This full year AP environmental science class is equivalent to an introductory, one semester, college level, environmental science class. If you have successfully completed both high school level biology and chemistry, if you are interested in the environment and, if you are looking for a challenge, this course might be for you! Because this is a college level course, be ready to commit time to your study. This course will cover concepts in ecology, geology, sociology, economics, biology, and chemistry, that will further your understanding of how humans can live sustainably. Integrated in the course is a field study component which will improve your observational skills, allow you to develop and conduct well-designed experiments, and provide opportunity to interpret and share your observations, results and conclusions with your classmates. You will be applying concepts learned in the weekly lessons to your local field study, as well as collaborating with your classmates regularly on case studies and local environmental concerns to gain a global perspective on environmental issues. During the second semester you will engage in an independent research project which culminates in a project showcase where you will present your research to your classmates.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Environmental Science can be found here: AP Summer WorkCatherine Niedziela
Hopkins Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Environmental Science Section CN2
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One full academic year of both high school-level biology and chemistry. Materials Provided: Some basic lab supplies (thermometer; magnifying lens) and a reading packet.

Students will need access to both a scanner and a digital camera to complete assignments for this course. The scanner is needed only occasionally, but the digital camera will be used every couple of weeks.
Description: This full year AP environmental science class is equivalent to an introductory, one semester, college level, environmental science class. If you have successfully completed both high school level biology and chemistry, if you are interested in the environment and, if you are looking for a challenge, this course might be for you! Because this is a college level course, be ready to commit time to your study. This course will cover concepts in ecology, geology, sociology, economics, biology, and chemistry, that will further your understanding of how humans can live sustainably. Integrated in the course is a field study component which will improve your observational skills, allow you to develop and conduct well-designed experiments, and provide opportunity to interpret and share your observations, results and conclusions with your classmates. You will be applying concepts learned in the weekly lessons to your local field study, as well as collaborating with your classmates regularly on case studies and local environmental concerns to gain a global perspective on environmental issues. During the second semester you will engage in an independent research project which culminates in a project showcase where you will present your research to your classmates.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Environmental Science can be found here: AP Summer WorkCatherine Niedziela
Virtual High School


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Course Title: AP® Environmental Science Section CN2
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One full academic year of both high school-level biology and chemistry. Materials Provided: Some basic lab supplies (thermometer; magnifying lens) and a reading packet.

Students will need access to both a scanner and a digital camera to complete assignments for this course. The scanner is needed only occasionally, but the digital camera will be used every couple of weeks.
Description: This full year AP environmental science class is equivalent to an introductory, one semester, college level, environmental science class. If you have successfully completed both high school level biology and chemistry, if you are interested in the environment and, if you are looking for a challenge, this course might be for you! Because this is a college level course, be ready to commit time to your study. This course will cover concepts in ecology, geology, sociology, economics, biology, and chemistry, that will further your understanding of how humans can live sustainably. Integrated in the course is a field study component which will improve your observational skills, allow you to develop and conduct well-designed experiments, and provide opportunity to interpret and share your observations, results and conclusions with your classmates. You will be applying concepts learned in the weekly lessons to your local field study, as well as collaborating with your classmates regularly on case studies and local environmental concerns to gain a global perspective on environmental issues. During the second semester you will engage in an independent research project which culminates in a project showcase where you will present your research to your classmates.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Environmental Science can be found here: AP Summer WorkCatherine Niedziela
Virtual High School


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Course Title: AP® Environmental Science Section DC
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One full academic year of both high school-level biology and chemistry. Materials Provided: Some basic lab supplies (thermometer; magnifying lens).

Students will need access to both a scanner and a digital camera to complete assignments for this course. The scanner is needed only occasionally, but the digital camera will be used every couple of weeks.
Description: This full year AP environmental science class is equivalent to an introductory, one semester, college level, environmental science class. If you have successfully completed both high school level biology and chemistry, if you are interested in the environment and, if you are looking for a challenge, this course might be for you! Because this is a college level course, be ready to commit time to your study. This course will cover concepts in ecology, geology, sociology, economics, biology, and chemistry, that will further your understanding of how humans can live sustainably. Integrated in the course is a field study component which will improve your observational skills, allow you to develop and conduct well-designed experiments, and provide opportunity to interpret and share your observations, results and conclusions with your classmates. You will be applying concepts learned in the weekly lessons to your local field study, as well as collaborating with your classmates regularly on case studies and local environmental concerns to gain a global perspective on environmental issues. During the second semester you will engage in an independent research project which culminates in a project showcase where you will present your research to your classmates.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Environmental Science can be found here: AP Summer WorkDonna Cochrane
North Attleboro High School


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Course Title: AP® Environmental Science Section DC
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One full academic year of both high school-level biology and chemistry. Materials Provided: Some basic lab supplies (thermometer; magnifying lens).

Students will need access to both a scanner and a digital camera to complete assignments for this course. The scanner is needed only occasionally, but the digital camera will be used every couple of weeks.
Description: This full year AP environmental science class is equivalent to an introductory, one semester, college level, environmental science class. If you have successfully completed both high school level biology and chemistry, if you are interested in the environment and, if you are looking for a challenge, this course might be for you! Because this is a college level course, be ready to commit time to your study. This course will cover concepts in ecology, geology, sociology, economics, biology, and chemistry, that will further your understanding of how humans can live sustainably. Integrated in the course is a field study component which will improve your observational skills, allow you to develop and conduct well-designed experiments, and provide opportunity to interpret and share your observations, results and conclusions with your classmates. You will be applying concepts learned in the weekly lessons to your local field study, as well as collaborating with your classmates regularly on case studies and local environmental concerns to gain a global perspective on environmental issues. During the second semester you will engage in an independent research project which culminates in a project showcase where you will present your research to your classmates.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Environmental Science can be found here: AP Summer WorkDonna Cochrane
North Attleboro High School


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Course Title: AP® Environmental Science Section VA
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One full academic year of both high school-level biology and chemistry. Materials Provided: Some basic lab supplies (thermometer; magnifying lens).

Students will need access to both a scanner and a digital camera to complete assignments for this course. The scanner is needed only occasionally, but the digital camera will be used every couple of weeks.
Description: This full year AP environmental science class is equivalent to an introductory, one semester, college level, environmental science class. If you have successfully completed both high school level biology and chemistry, if you are interested in the environment and, if you are looking for a challenge, this course might be for you! Because this is a college level course, be ready to commit time to your study. This course will cover concepts in ecology, geology, sociology, economics, biology, and chemistry, that will further your understanding of how humans can live sustainably. Integrated in the course is a field study component which will improve your observational skills, allow you to develop and conduct well-designed experiments, and provide opportunity to interpret and share your observations, results and conclusions with your classmates. You will be applying concepts learned in the weekly lessons to your local field study, as well as collaborating with your classmates regularly on case studies and local environmental concerns to gain a global perspective on environmental issues. During the second semester you will engage in an independent research project which culminates in a project showcase where you will present your research to your classmates.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Environmental Science can be found here: AP Summer WorkVirginia Asciolla
Virtual High School


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Course Title: AP® Environmental Science Section VA
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced Placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: One full academic year of both high school-level biology and chemistry. Materials Provided: Some basic lab supplies (thermometer; magnifying lens).

Students will need access to both a scanner and a digital camera to complete assignments for this course. The scanner is needed only occasionally, but the digital camera will be used every couple of weeks.
Description: This full year AP environmental science class is equivalent to an introductory, one semester, college level, environmental science class. If you have successfully completed both high school level biology and chemistry, if you are interested in the environment and, if you are looking for a challenge, this course might be for you! Because this is a college level course, be ready to commit time to your study. This course will cover concepts in ecology, geology, sociology, economics, biology, and chemistry, that will further your understanding of how humans can live sustainably. Integrated in the course is a field study component which will improve your observational skills, allow you to develop and conduct well-designed experiments, and provide opportunity to interpret and share your observations, results and conclusions with your classmates. You will be applying concepts learned in the weekly lessons to your local field study, as well as collaborating with your classmates regularly on case studies and local environmental concerns to gain a global perspective on environmental issues. During the second semester you will engage in an independent research project which culminates in a project showcase where you will present your research to your classmates.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Environmental Science can be found here: AP Summer WorkVirginia Asciolla
Virtual High School


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Course Title: AP® European History Section DF
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Several activities in this course require audio collaboration and interaction and therefore students are required to have a computer microphone.
Description: AP European History is a rigorous academic course that furnishes a basic narrative of events and movements in European History from 1450 to the present. It prepares students for the demands of a college education by providing experience in college level reading, writing and responsibility for learning. AP European History is challenging and stimulating, yet requires much more time than other high school courses. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed. This course promotes just the type of effective time management skills and organization that are necessary for success in higher education.

Students will investigate the broad themes of intellectual, cultural and political history and will appreciate how those ideas are reflected in trends of philosophy, popular literature and the arts. As events in history can only be understood in terms of their social context, this course will examine demographics and the influences of social classes and gender roles on history. The course will also focus on economic history and the role of industrialization by reviewing the development of commercial practices and changing economic structures to recognize Europe's influence on the world.

Throughout the course, AP European History students can expect to:
·Watch or listen to traditional history lectures produced by the teacher or offered by colleges and
universities online.
·Participate in class discussions of primary documents and events in threaded discussions.
·Debate key issues or role-play historic figures through student audio recordings.
·Exercise essay writing skills designed to meet the requirements outlined by the College Board for Advanced Placement exams.
·Collaborate with other students in research groups using Web 2.0 information tools.
·Supplement traditional textbook reading with historical journals and primary documents.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.David Farrington
Yarmouth High School


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Course Title: AP® European History Section LDJ
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Several activities in this course require audio collaboration and interaction and therefore students are required to have a computer microphone.
Description: AP European History is a rigorous academic course that furnishes a basic narrative of events and movements in European History from 1450 to the present. It prepares students for the demands of a college education by providing experience in college level reading, writing and responsibility for learning. AP European History is challenging and stimulating, yet requires much more time than other high school courses. Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to homework and study, are necessary to succeed. This course promotes just the type of effective time management skills and organization that are necessary for success in higher education.

Students will investigate the broad themes of intellectual, cultural and political history and will appreciate how those ideas are reflected in trends of philosophy, popular literature and the arts. As events in history can only be understood in terms of their social context, this course will examine demographics and the influences of social classes and gender roles on history. The course will also focus on economic history and the role of industrialization by reviewing the development of commercial practices and changing economic structures to recognize Europe's influence on the world.

Throughout the course, AP European History students can expect to:
Watch or listen to traditional history lectures produced by the teacher or offered by colleges and
universities online.
Participate in class discussions of primary documents and events in threaded discussions.
Debate key issues or role-play historic figures through student audio recordings.
Exercise essay writing skills designed to meet the requirements outlined by the College Board for Advanced Placement exams.
Collaborate with other students in research groups using Web 2.0 information tools.
Supplement traditional textbook reading with historical journals and primary documents.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Larisa Donis-Jeppson
Manville High School


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Course Title: AP® French Language and Culture Section FD
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of French III with a grade of B or better. Successful completion of French IV is preferred.

Technology Requirements:
Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Audio recording requires Adobe Flash 10.1 or later. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: TheAP® French Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in French and to enable students to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. The course focuses on interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication, encourages cultural awareness, and incorporates the six themes of global challenges, science and technology, contemporary life, personal and public identities, families and communities and beauty and aesthetics. By using these six course themes outlined in the AP curriculum, students will increase their cultural knowledge and experience with the Francophone world through a comparison with their own cultural experience.

Instructional content will include the arts, current events, literature, sports, and more. In addition to textbooks, materials will include websites, podcasts, films, newspapers, magazines, and literature. The course helps develop language skills that can be applied beyond the French course in further French study and everyday life.

AP® French will enable advanced French students to improve writing skills and problem-solving techniques in preparation for the AP French Language Exam. Students will explore the French-speaking world through a variety of perspectives based on authentic and up- to- date materials and the use of French media like TV5 Monde, while gaining a better understanding of themselves.

A variety of assignments and activities will be included. For example, students would read and discuss poetry, create their own poetry and showcase their poems in a class magazine. Another example is that students might participate in an online mock trial after researching France’s role in the slave trade and which key figures were involved. They would assume the roles of those figures who lived during that specific time period. Also, students will read an important work of classic or contemporary literature, write an essay that focuses on a specific theme or aspect and then participate in a discussion that addresses comprehension, stylistic techniques and relevant historical or situational background. Current events in French society, politics, culture, education, etc. would also drive assignments and activities regarding discussions, debates, written work and research that encourage students to consider their own views, in oral and written formats as well as those of their peers.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer work. All summer work for AP French can be found here: AP Summer Work
Frances Dodson
Trinity Valley School


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Course Title: AP® French Language and Culture Section GA
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of French III with a grade of B or better. Successful completion of French IV is preferred.

Technology Requirements:
Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Audio recording requires Adobe Flash 10.1 or later. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: TheAP® French Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in French and to enable students to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. The course focuses on interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication, encourages cultural awareness, and incorporates the six themes of global challenges, science and technology, contemporary life, personal and public identities, families and communities and beauty and aesthetics. By using these six course themes outlined in the AP curriculum, students will increase their cultural knowledge and experience with the Francophone world through a comparison with their own cultural experience.

Instructional content will include the arts, current events, literature, sports, and more. In addition to textbooks, materials will include websites, podcasts, films, newspapers, magazines, and literature. The course helps develop language skills that can be applied beyond the French course in further French study and everyday life.

AP® French will enable advanced French students to improve writing skills and problem-solving techniques in preparation for the AP French Language Exam. Students will explore the French-speaking world through a variety of perspectives based on authentic and up- to- date materials and the use of French media like TV5 Monde, while gaining a better understanding of themselves.

A variety of assignments and activities will be included. For example, students would read and discuss poetry, create their own poetry and showcase their poems in a class magazine. Another example is that students might participate in an online mock trial after researching France’s role in the slave trade and which key figures were involved. They would assume the roles of those figures who lived during that specific time period. Also, students will read an important work of classic or contemporary literature, write an essay that focuses on a specific theme or aspect and then participate in a discussion that addresses comprehension, stylistic techniques and relevant historical or situational background. Current events in French society, politics, culture, education, etc. would also drive assignments and activities regarding discussions, debates, written work and research that encourage students to consider their own views, in oral and written formats as well as those of their peers.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer work. All summer work for AP French can be found here: AP Summer Work
Gary Arsenault
White Mountains Regional High School


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Course Title: AP® French Language and Culture Section KL
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of French III with a grade of B or better. Successful completion of French IV is preferred.

Technology Requirements:
Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Audio recording requires Adobe Flash 10.1 or later. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: The AP® French Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in French and to enable students to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. The course focuses on interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication, encourages cultural awareness, and incorporates the six themes of global challenges, science and technology, contemporary life, personal and public identities, families and communities and beauty and aesthetics. By using these six course themes outlined in the AP curriculum, students will increase their cultural knowledge and experience with the Francophone world through a comparison with their own cultural experience.

Instructional content will include the arts, current events, literature, sports, and more. In addition to textbooks, materials will include websites, podcasts, films, newspapers, magazines, and literature. The course helps develop language skills that can be applied beyond the French course in further French study and everyday life.

AP® French will enable advanced French students to improve writing skills and problem-solving techniques in preparation for the AP French Language Exam. Students will explore the French-speaking world through a variety of perspectives based on authentic and up- to- date materials and the use of French media like TV5 Monde, while gaining a better understanding of themselves.

A variety of assignments and activities will be included. For example, students would read and discuss poetry, create their own poetry and showcase their poems in a class magazine. Another example is that students might participate in an online mock trial after researching France’s role in the slave trade and which key figures were involved. They would assume the roles of those figures who lived during that specific time period. Also, students will read an important work of classic or contemporary literature, write an essay that focuses on a specific theme or aspect and then participate in a discussion that addresses comprehension, stylistic techniques and relevant historical or situational background. Current events in French society, politics, culture, education, etc. would also drive assignments and activities regarding discussions, debates, written work and research that encourage students to consider their own views, in oral and written formats as well as those of their peers.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer work. All summer work for AP French can be found here: AP Summer Work
Kathleen Lessard
Rocky Hill High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® French Language and Culture Section LR
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of French III with a grade of B or better. Successful completion of French IV is preferred.

Technology Requirements:
Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Audio recording requires Adobe Flash 10.1 or later. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: The AP® French Language and Culture course is designed to promote proficiency in French and to enable students to explore culture in contemporary and historical contexts. The course focuses on interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication, encourages cultural awareness, and incorporates the six themes of global challenges, science and technology, contemporary life, personal and public identities, families and communities and beauty and aesthetics. By using these six course themes outlined in the AP curriculum, students will increase their cultural knowledge and experience with the Francophone world through a comparison with their own cultural experience.

Instructional content will include the arts, current events, literature, sports, and more. In addition to textbooks, materials will include websites, podcasts, films, newspapers, magazines, and literature. The course helps develop language skills that can be applied beyond the French course in further French study and everyday life.

AP® French will enable advanced French students to improve writing skills and problem-solving techniques in preparation for the AP French Language Exam. Students will explore the French-speaking world through a variety of perspectives based on authentic and up- to- date materials and the use of French media like TV5 Monde, while gaining a better understanding of themselves.

A variety of assignments and activities will be included. For example, students would read and discuss poetry, create their own poetry and showcase their poems in a class magazine. Another example is that students might participate in an online mock trial after researching France’s role in the slave trade and which key figures were involved. They would assume the roles of those figures who lived during that specific time period. Also, students will read an important work of classic or contemporary literature, write an essay that focuses on a specific theme or aspect and then participate in a discussion that addresses comprehension, stylistic techniques and relevant historical or situational background. Current events in French society, politics, culture, education, etc. would also drive assignments and activities regarding discussions, debates, written work and research that encourage students to consider their own views, in oral and written formats as well as those of their peers.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer work. All summer work for AP French can be found here: AP Summer Work
Liwia Rosamond
Archbishop Molloy High School


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Course Title: AP® Government & Politics: U.S. Section JH
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Technology requirements:
Adobe Acrobat Reader
Microsoft Word or Windows Wordpad
Windows Media Player
High speed internet connection preferred (for viewing videos)
Description: AP Government and Politics: United States is a college level course designed for highly motivated students who have a strong interest in the area of American government. The course approaches government and politics in the United States from an analytical perspective, and involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Students should expect assignments of significant required reading each week, as well as required participation in many group discussions and activities as we analyze the Constitution as a document and investigate its use as the foundation of our government. Students will interpret and evaluate documents related to American government and be expected to write well-structured essays.

Students are expected to register for and to take the Advanced Placement Government exam in May.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Government and Politics can be found here: AP Summer WorkJohn Honer
Pentucket Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Government & Politics: U.S. Section KR
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Technology requirements:
Adobe Acrobat Reader
Microsoft Word or Windows Wordpad
Windows Media Player
High speed internet connection preferred (for viewing videos)
Description: AP Government and Politics: United States is a college level course designed for highly motivated students who have a strong interest in the area of American government. The course approaches government and politics in the United States from an analytical perspective, and involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Students should expect assignments of significant required reading each week, as well as required participation in many group discussions and activities as we analyze the Constitution as a document and investigate its use as the foundation of our government. Students will interpret and evaluate documents related to American government and be expected to write well-structured essays.

Students are expected to register for and to take the Advanced Placement Government exam in May.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Government and Politics can be found here: AP Summer WorkKaren Rolston
Allentown Central Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Government & Politics: U.S. Section KR2
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Technology requirements:
Adobe Acrobat Reader
Microsoft Word or Windows Wordpad
Windows Media Player
High speed internet connection preferred (for viewing videos)
Description: AP Government and Politics: United States is a college level course designed for highly motivated students who have a strong interest in the area of American government. The course approaches government and politics in the United States from an analytical perspective, and involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Students should expect assignments of significant required reading each week, as well as required participation in many group discussions and activities as we analyze the Constitution as a document and investigate its use as the foundation of our government. Students will interpret and evaluate documents related to American government and be expected to write well-structured essays.

Students are expected to register for and to take the Advanced Placement Government exam in May.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Government and Politics can be found here: AP Summer WorkKaren Rolston
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Government & Politics: U.S. Section TA
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Technology requirements:
Adobe Acrobat Reader
Microsoft Word or Windows Wordpad
Windows Media Player
High speed internet connection preferred (for viewing videos)
Description: AP Government and Politics: United States is a college level course designed for highly motivated students who have a strong interest in the area of American government. The course approaches government and politics in the United States from an analytical perspective, and involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Students should expect assignments of significant required reading each week, as well as required participation in many group discussions and activities as we analyze the Constitution as a document and investigate its use as the foundation of our government. Students will interpret and evaluate documents related to American government and be expected to write well-structured essays.

Students are expected to register for and to take the Advanced Placement Government exam in May. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.
This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Government and Politics can be found here: AP Summer WorkThomas Anderson
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Music Theory Private Offering
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Computer with external speakers or headphones, audio CD playback capability, and an external microphone for recording audio.
Experience in reading basic musical notation (with the voice or a band/orchestra instrument) is required.

* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:
http://muparcma1112.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

* Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/
Description: ***This is a private offering for students from Jefferson Area High School***

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of music theory, sight reading, and aural skills that is equivalent to that of a first-year college music student. It is also designed with the explicit purpose of preparing the student for the AP exam in Music Theory. The course content and presentation will adhere to the guidelines set forth by the College Board in the Music Theory Course Description for 2010-2011.

Students: You have elected to take an AP course due to (a) your desire to receive college credit for your current educational experience, and/or (b) your interest in music and its fundamentals. Whatever your interest or previous experience, be prepared to work at an accelerated pace. As an AP student, I will expect the highest level of responsibility and effort from you toward the course objectives. By the conclusion of the course material, you will be well prepared to take (and pass) the AP exam in May. Having passed the exam, you will have the opportunity to receive credit from your future college or university (depending on the school’s AP policies).

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Barbara Elder
Jefferson Area High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Music Theory Section CMA
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Computer with external speakers or headphones, audio CD playback capability, and an external microphone for recording audio.
Experience in reading basic musical notation (with the voice or a band/orchestra instrument) is required.

* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:
http://muparcma1112.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

* Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/
Description: This course is designed to give the student an understanding of music theory, sight reading, and aural skills that is equivalent to that of a first-year college music student. It is also designed with the explicit purpose of preparing the student for the AP exam in Music Theory. The course content and presentation will adhere to the guidelines set forth by the College Board in the Music Theory Course Description for 2010-2011.

Students: You have elected to take an AP course due to (a) your desire to receive college credit for your current educational experience, and/or (b) your interest in music and its fundamentals. Whatever your interest or previous experience, be prepared to work at an accelerated pace. As an AP student, I will expect the highest level of responsibility and effort from you toward the course objectives. By the conclusion of the course material, you will be well prepared to take (and pass) the AP exam in May. Having passed the exam, you will have the opportunity to receive credit from your future college or university (depending on the school’s AP policies).

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Cathy Mander-Adams
Winooski High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Music Theory Section CY
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Computer with external speakers or headphones, audio CD playback capability, and an external microphone for recording audio.
Experience in reading basic musical notation (with the voice or a band/orchestra instrument) is required.
* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:
http://pusictmh1112.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

*Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/
Description: This course is designed to give the student an understanding of music theory, sight reading, and aural skills that is equivalent to that of a first-year college music student. It is also designed with the explicit purpose of preparing the student for the AP exam in Music Theory. The course content and presentation will adhere to the guidelines set forth by the College Board in the Music Theory Course Description for 2010-2011.

Students: You have elected to take an AP course due to (a) your desire to receive college credit for your current educational experience, and/or (b) your interest in music and its fundamentals. Whatever your interest or previous experience, be prepared to work at an accelerated pace. As an AP student, I will expect the highest level of responsibility and effort from you toward the course objectives. By the conclusion of the course material, you will be well prepared to take (and pass) the AP exam in May. Having passed the exam, you will have the opportunity to receive credit from your future college or university (depending on the school’s AP policies).

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Charles Yassky
Tappan Zee High School (SOCSD)


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Music Theory Section DC
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Computer with external speakers or headphones, audio CD playback capability, and an external microphone for recording audio.
Experience in reading basic musical notation (with the voice or a band/orchestra instrument) is required.
* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:
http://pusictmh1112.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

* Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting:
http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/
Description: This course is designed to give the student an understanding of music theory, sight reading, and aural skills that is equivalent to that of a first-year college music student. It is also designed with the explicit purpose of preparing the student for the AP exam in Music Theory. The course content and presentation will adhere to the guidelines set forth by the College Board in the Music Theory Course Description for 2010-2011.

Students: You have elected to take an AP course due to (a) your desire to receive college credit for your current educational experience, and/or (b) your interest in music and its fundamentals. Whatever your interest or previous experience, be prepared to work at an accelerated pace. As an AP student, I will expect the highest level of responsibility and effort from you toward the course objectives. By the conclusion of the course material, you will be well prepared to take (and pass) the AP exam in May. Having passed the exam, you will have the opportunity to receive credit from your future college or university (depending on the school’s AP policies).

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Don Clark
Paulding High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Music Theory Section HB
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Computer with external speakers or headphones, audio CD playback capability, and an external microphone for recording audio.
Experience in reading basic musical notation (with the voice or a band/orchestra instrument) is required.

* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:
http://muparcma1112.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

* Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/
Description: This course is designed to give the student an understanding of music theory, sight reading, and aural skills that is equivalent to that of a first-year college music student. It is also designed with the explicit purpose of preparing the student for the AP exam in Music Theory. The course content and presentation will adhere to the guidelines set forth by the College Board in the Music Theory Course Description for 2010-2011.

Students: You have elected to take an AP course due to (a) your desire to receive college credit for your current educational experience, and/or (b) your interest in music and its fundamentals. Whatever your interest or previous experience, be prepared to work at an accelerated pace. As an AP student, I will expect the highest level of responsibility and effort from you toward the course objectives. By the conclusion of the course material, you will be well prepared to take (and pass) the AP exam in May. Having passed the exam, you will have the opportunity to receive credit from your future college or university (depending on the school’s AP policies).

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Hilary Bridge
Littleton MA High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Music Theory Section JW
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Computer with external speakers or headphones, audio CD playback capability, and an external microphone for recording audio.
Experience in reading basic musical notation (with the voice or a band/orchestra instrument) is required.

* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:
http://muparcma1112.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

* Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/
Description: This course is designed to give the student an understanding of music theory, sight reading, and aural skills that is equivalent to that of a first-year college music student. It is also designed with the explicit purpose of preparing the student for the AP exam in Music Theory. The course content and presentation will adhere to the guidelines set forth by the College Board in the Music Theory Course Description for 2010-2011.

Students: You have elected to take an AP course due to (a) your desire to receive college credit for your current educational experience, and/or (b) your interest in music and its fundamentals. Whatever your interest or previous experience, be prepared to work at an accelerated pace. As an AP student, I will expect the highest level of responsibility and effort from you toward the course objectives. By the conclusion of the course material, you will be well prepared to take (and pass) the AP exam in May. Having passed the exam, you will have the opportunity to receive credit from your future college or university (depending on the school’s AP policies).

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Jennifer Wojcik
The Gunnery


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Physics B Section DD
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Mathematics skills through Pre-Calculus or its equivalent. Must have a good grasp of plane geometry, right angle trigonometry and be able to factor quadratic equations. This course will not assume any prior physics course knowledge, however, if you have already taken an introductory course it should make the going easier for the first eight chapters.

Materials Required: A good scientific calculator and supplies available around the house.
Description: This course is designed to prepare students to participate in the Advanced Placement Physics (AP) test administered in May. There are two AP tests. "C" requires the use of calculus and only covers mechanics and electricity and magnetism. "B" is the approximate equivalent of a two-semester course in non-calculus based physics. Topics will range over the entire spectrum of physics including mechanics, properties of matter, thermodynamics, acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Students will be required to participate in small group discussions, home laboratory experiments, a few virtual field trips and an extensive array of tests and quizzes.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Physics B can be found here: AP Summer WorkDavid Dixon
Webster High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Physics B Section DY
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Mathematics skills through Pre-Calculus or its equivalent. Must have a good grasp of plane geometry, right angle trigonometry and be able to factor quadratic equations. This course will not assume any prior physics course knowledge, however, if you have already taken an introductory course it should make the going easier for the first eight chapters.

Materials Required: A good scientific calculator and supplies available around the house.
Description: This course is designed to prepare students to participate in the Advanced Placement Physics (AP) test administered in May. There are two AP tests. "C" requires the use of calculus and only covers mechanics and electricity and magnetism. "B" is the approximate equivalent of a two-semester course in non-calculus based physics. Topics will range over the entire spectrum of physics including mechanics, properties of matter, thermodynamics, acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Students will be required to participate in small group discussions, home laboratory experiments, a few virtual field trips and an extensive array of tests and quizzes.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Physics B can be found here: AP Summer WorkDavid Yaeger
Plymouth South High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Physics B Section JB
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Mathematics skills through Pre-Calculus or its equivalent. Must have a good grasp of plane geometry, right angle trigonometry and be able to factor quadratic equations. This course will not assume any prior physics course knowledge, however, if you have already taken an introductory course it should make the going easier for the first eight chapters.

Materials Required: A good scientific calculator and supplies available around the house.
Description: This course is designed to prepare students to participate in the Advanced Placement Physics (AP) test administered in May. There are two AP tests. "C" requires the use of calculus and only covers mechanics and electricity and magnetism. "B" is the approximate equivalent of a two-semester course in non-calculus based physics. Topics will range over the entire spectrum of physics including mechanics, properties of matter, thermodynamics, acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Students will be required to participate in small group discussions, home laboratory experiments, a few virtual field trips and an extensive array of tests and quizzes.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Physics B can be found here: AP Summer WorkJeff Bugenhagen
Upper Merion Area High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Physics B Section JC
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Mathematics skills through Pre-Calculus or its equivalent. Must have a good grasp of plane geometry, right angle trigonometry and be able to factor quadratic equations. This course will not assume any prior physics course knowledge, however, if you have already taken an introductory course it should make the going easier for the first eight chapters.

Materials Required: A good scientific calculator and supplies available around the house.
Description: This course is designed to prepare students to participate in the Advanced Placement Physics (AP) test administered in May. There are two AP tests. "C" requires the use of calculus and only covers mechanics and electricity and magnetism. "B" is the approximate equivalent of a two-semester course in non-calculus based physics. Topics will range over the entire spectrum of physics including mechanics, properties of matter, thermodynamics, acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Students will be required to participate in small group discussions, home laboratory experiments, a few virtual field trips and an extensive array of tests and quizzes.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Physics B can be found here: AP Summer WorkJoseph Clement
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Physics C
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: 1. Grade of B+ or better in prior Physics class.
2. Recommendation by former Physics teacher.
3. Completion or co-enrollment in AP Calculus.
Description: This course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, that will form a foundation for college studies of other sciences, engineering and technology. This algebra, geometry, and calculus based course emphasizes several components - knowledge of the basic laws of nature, the ability to apply that knowledge to the particular phenomenon and the ability to achieve its complete experimental and theoretical explanation. Great attention is given to the connectivity between the sciences. In addition to this interdisciplinary approach, modern technology is used to increase the level of study, which includes a multimedia approach to reports and projects. The sequence of topics is traditional and relies on the College Board requirements. Theory, discussion, labs and problem solving are the major tools for the students' education.

As an advanced placement (college-level) course, this course is rigorous, and students can expect to spend a minimum of 2 hours per day (5 days per week) doing coursework. Students should be highly motivated & interested in pursuing college studies science, engineering and/or technology. Access to Excel spreadsheet is important as it is used frequently for mathematical modeling of physics problems.

Basic knowledge of integrals and derivatives is required; students concurrently enrolled in AP Calculus may find that the calculus components of this course may be introduced before these same topics are covered in their AP Calculus course.  Students taking calculus concurrently can successfully complete this course under those conditions but should work closely with their AP Physics Instructor to avoid unnecessary frustration due to the timing of calculus topics. Students should always let instructors know when calculus topics in physics precede what they have learned in calculus class

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Kristin Kiefaber
Newmarket Junior-Senior High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Physics C Section JC
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: 1. Grade of B+ or better in prior Physics class.
2. Recommendation by former Physics teacher.
3. Completion or co-enrollment in AP Calculus.
Description: This course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, that will form a foundation for college studies of other sciences, engineering and technology. This algebra, geometry, and calculus based course emphasizes several components - knowledge of the basic laws of nature, the ability to apply that knowledge to the particular phenomenon and the ability to achieve its complete experimental and theoretical explanation. Great attention is given to the connectivity between the sciences. In addition to this interdisciplinary approach, modern technology is used to increase the level of study, which includes a multimedia approach to reports and projects. The sequence of topics is traditional and relies on the College Board requirements. Theory, discussion, labs and problem solving are the major tools for the students' education.

As an advanced placement (college-level) course, this course is rigorous, and students can expect to spend a minimum of 2 hours per day (5 days per week) doing coursework. Students should be highly motivated & interested in pursuing college studies science, engineering and/or technology. Access to Excel spreadsheet is important as it is used frequently for mathematical modeling of physics problems.

Basic knowledge of integrals and derivatives is required; students concurrently enrolled in AP Calculus may find that the calculus components of this course may be introduced before these same topics are covered in their AP Calculus course.  Students taking calculus concurrently can successfully complete this course under those conditions but should work closely with their AP Physics Instructor to avoid unnecessary frustration due to the timing of calculus topics. Students should always let instructors know when calculus topics in physics precede what they have learned in calculus class

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Joseph Clement
Beverly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Physics C Section JC2
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: 1. Grade of B+ or better in prior Physics class.
2. Recommendation by former Physics teacher.
3. Completion or co-enrollment in AP Calculus.
Description: This course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, that will form a foundation for college studies of other sciences, engineering and technology. This algebra, geometry, and calculus based course emphasizes several components - knowledge of the basic laws of nature, the ability to apply that knowledge to the particular phenomenon and the ability to achieve its complete experimental and theoretical explanation. Great attention is given to the connectivity between the sciences. In addition to this interdisciplinary approach, modern technology is used to increase the level of study, which includes a multimedia approach to reports and projects. The sequence of topics is traditional and relies on the College Board requirements. Theory, discussion, labs and problem solving are the major tools for the students' education.

As an advanced placement (college-level) course, this course is rigorous, and students can expect to spend a minimum of 2 hours per day (5 days per week) doing coursework. Students should be highly motivated & interested in pursuing college studies science, engineering and/or technology. Access to Excel spreadsheet is important as it is used frequently for mathematical modeling of physics problems.

Basic knowledge of integrals and derivatives is required; students concurrently enrolled in AP Calculus may find that the calculus components of this course may be introduced before these same topics are covered in their AP Calculus course.  Students taking calculus concurrently can successfully complete this course under those conditions but should work closely with their AP Physics Instructor to avoid unnecessary frustration due to the timing of calculus topics. Students should always let instructors know when calculus topics in physics precede what they have learned in calculus class

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Joseph Clement
Virtual High School


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Course Title: AP® Psychology Section AC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkAnn Coates
Hanover High School


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Course Title: AP® Psychology Section AL
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkAmanda Letoile
Cumberland Public Schools


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Course Title: AP® Psychology Section BF
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

For more information regarding advanced placement courses, please read the VHS AP Course Policy.

*** Note: Before enrolling in this course please read the VHS AP Course Policy

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkElizabeth Ferns
Virtual High School


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Course Title: AP® Psychology Section BF2
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

For more information regarding advanced placement courses, please read the VHS AP Course Policy.

*** Note: Before enrolling in this course please read the VHS AP Course Policy

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkElizabeth Ferns
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Psychology Section DO
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkDeborah Olson
Wiscasset High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Psychology Section PC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkPeter Corr
Coventry High School RI


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Course Title: AP® Psychology Section RG
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkMichael Milton
Burlington MA High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Psychology Section SC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkSusan Cowell
Lyndhurst High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Psychology Section SC2
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkSusan Cowell
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Psychology Section VM
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: The AP® Psychology course is designed around a variety of assignments that promote acquiring a deep understanding of content, as well as developing study and writing skills necessary to be successful on the advanced placement exam. While preparation for the AP Exam is an important goal of the course, helping students to better understand themselves and the behavior of others is another important aspect of the course.
Students should expect weekly reading assignments in the ebook, Meyers’ Psychology for AP in addition to research, writing, group work, and participation in discussions.

Tips for completing multiple choice questions and writing the essay part of the exam are part of the instruction for this course. Students will be given numerous opportunities to review and practice for the AP exam through-out the course

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Psychology can be found here: AP Summer WorkVincent Mcgowan
David Brearley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Spanish Language Section DAG
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Spanish I-IV or the equivalent with at least a B average in your previous Spanish class. In this fifth year Spanish course, it is assumed that students have already learned the grammar and syntax of the language and have acquired strong skills in speaking, writing, reading, and understanding Spanish. The college-level curriculum for this course is designed to reinforce and sharpen these skills with the goal of achieving mastery in the skills of Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing as defined by the AP Spanish Language Course Description. Students will be working at a rigorous pace to cover the material and prepare for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. This course will meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in the Spanish language.

Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphone, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Instructions are provided for Sound Recorder, used in the D2L course. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: AP Spanish Language is intended for highly motivated students who wish to develop proficiency and integrate their language skills, providing frequent opportunities for students to use authentic materials and sources. Not only will they be prepared for the Spanish AP exam in May, but they will also gain an insight into the cultural aspects of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries. Students will be exposed to many different forms of written and spoken Spanish through the study of poems, short stories, newspaper articles, along with radio and television broadcasts.

The course will:
* Encourage a thematic approach to teaching.
Students participate in activities that integrate language, literature, and culture; make connections to other disciplines; and compare aspects of the target culture with other cultures.

* Articulate clear learning objectives.
Clearly articulated learning objectives provide information on the knowledge and skills students should demonstrate to succeed on the exam.

* Reflect college-level expectations.
The College Board collaborates with language educators from leading colleges, universities, and secondary schools to ensure that the course reflects rigorous college standards.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are expected to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS . Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer assignements. All summer work for AP Spanish can be found here: AP Summer WorkDoris Alicia González
Notre Dame High School PR


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Spanish Language Section KCF
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Spanish I-IV or the equivalent with at least a B average in your previous Spanish class. In this fifth year Spanish course, it is assumed that students have already learned the grammar and syntax of the language and have acquired strong skills in speaking, writing, reading, and understanding Spanish. The college-level curriculum for this course is designed to reinforce and sharpen these skills with the goal of achieving mastery in the skills of Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing as defined by the AP Spanish Language Course Description. Students will be working at a rigorous pace to cover the material and prepare for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. This course will meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in the Spanish language.

Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphone, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Instructions are provided for Sound Recorder, used in the D2L course. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: AP Spanish Language is intended for highly motivated students who wish to develop proficiency and integrate their language skills, providing frequent opportunities for students to use authentic materials and sources. Not only will they be prepared for the Spanish AP exam in May, but they will also gain an insight into the cultural aspects of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries. Students will be exposed to many different forms of written and spoken Spanish through the study of poems, short stories, newspaper articles, along with radio and television broadcasts.

The course will:
* Encourage a thematic approach to teaching.
Students participate in activities that integrate language, literature, and culture; make connections to other disciplines; and compare aspects of the target culture with other cultures.

* Articulate clear learning objectives.
Clearly articulated learning objectives provide information on the knowledge and skills students should demonstrate to succeed on the exam.

* Reflect college-level expectations.
The College Board collaborates with language educators from leading colleges, universities, and secondary schools to ensure that the course reflects rigorous college standards.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are expected to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS . Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Spanish can be found here: AP Summer WorkKaren Cribbin Fitzpatrick
Bethlehem Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Spanish Language Section RR
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Spanish I-IV or the equivalent with at least a B average in your previous Spanish class. In this fifth year Spanish course, it is assumed that students have already learned the grammar and syntax of the language and have acquired strong skills in speaking, writing, reading, and understanding Spanish. The college-level curriculum for this course is designed to reinforce and sharpen these skills with the goal of achieving mastery in the skills of Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing as defined by the AP Spanish Language Course Description. Students will be working at a rigorous pace to cover the material and prepare for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. This course will meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in the Spanish language.

Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphone, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Instructions are provided for Sound Recorder, used in the D2L course. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: AP Spanish Language is intended for highly motivated students who wish to develop proficiency and integrate their language skills, providing frequent opportunities for students to use authentic materials and sources. Not only will they be prepared for the Spanish AP exam in May, but they will also gain an insight into the cultural aspects of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries. Students will be exposed to many different forms of written and spoken Spanish through the study of poems, short stories, newspaper articles, along with radio and television broadcasts.

The course will:
* Encourage a thematic approach to teaching.
Students participate in activities that integrate language, literature, and culture; make connections to other disciplines; and compare aspects of the target culture with other cultures.

* Articulate clear learning objectives.
Clearly articulated learning objectives provide information on the knowledge and skills students should demonstrate to succeed on the exam.

* Reflect college-level expectations.
The College Board collaborates with language educators from leading colleges, universities, and secondary schools to ensure that the course reflects rigorous college standards.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are expected to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS . Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

*** Note: Before enrolling in this course please read the VHS AP Course Policy

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Spanish can be found here: AP Summer WorkRobert Rineer
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Spanish Language Section SN
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Spanish I-IV or the equivalent with at least a B average in your previous Spanish class. In this fifth year Spanish course, it is assumed that students have already learned the grammar and syntax of the language and have acquired strong skills in speaking, writing, reading, and understanding Spanish. The college-level curriculum for this course is designed to reinforce and sharpen these skills with the goal of achieving mastery in the skills of Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing as defined by the AP Spanish Language Course Description. Students will be working at a rigorous pace to cover the material and prepare for the Advanced Placement Examination in May. This course will meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in the Spanish language.

Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphone, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Instructions are provided for Sound Recorder, used in the D2L course. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: AP Spanish Language is intended for highly motivated students who wish to develop proficiency and integrate their language skills, providing frequent opportunities for students to use authentic materials and sources. Not only will they be prepared for the Spanish AP exam in May, but they will also gain an insight into the cultural aspects of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries. Students will be exposed to many different forms of written and spoken Spanish through the study of poems, short stories, newspaper articles, along with radio and television broadcasts.

The course will:
* Encourage a thematic approach to teaching.
Students participate in activities that integrate language, literature, and culture; make connections to other disciplines; and compare aspects of the target culture with other cultures.

* Articulate clear learning objectives.
Clearly articulated learning objectives provide information on the knowledge and skills students should demonstrate to succeed on the exam.

* Reflect college-level expectations.
The College Board collaborates with language educators from leading colleges, universities, and secondary schools to ensure that the course reflects rigorous college standards.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are expected to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS . Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.

This course has recommended summer reading. All summer work for AP Spanish can be found here: AP Summer WorkSusan Naughton
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Statistics Section AJ
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Algebra II
Description:
This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four themes:

Exploring data: students observe patterns in data, conjecture about relationships of variables.

Planning a study: students develop a plan to identify variables related to a conjecture and devise a means to measure them.

Anticipating patterns: students will develop mathematics models and simulations.

Statistical inference: students will use the models to draw conclusions from data and express confidence in the modeling process.

Students need to have access to a calculator (preferably a TI-83) and a spreadsheet software package (preferably Excel). They will be provided with a book and a software package.

Students will be evaluated on assignments, projects, weekly quizzes, unit tests, semester exams, and their contribution to discussions.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Andrea Jones
Foxborough High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Statistics Section BS
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Algebra II
Description: This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four themes:

Exploring data: students observe patterns in data, conjecture about relationships of variables.

Planning a study: students develop a plan to identify variables related to a conjecture and devise a means to measure them.

Anticipating patterns: students will develop mathematics models and simulations.

Statistical inference: students will use the models to draw conclusions from data and express confidence in the modeling process.

Students need to have access to a calculator (preferably a TI-83) and a spreadsheet software package (preferably Excel). They will be provided with a book and a software package.

Students will be evaluated on assignments, projects, weekly quizzes, unit tests, semester exams, and their contribution to discussions.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Beth Schiller
Hudson High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Statistics Section CW
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Algebra II
Description: This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four themes:

Exploring data: students observe patterns in data, conjecture about relationships of variables.

Planning a study: students develop a plan to identify variables related to a conjecture and devise a means to measure them.

Anticipating patterns: students will develop mathematics models and simulations.

Statistical inference: students will use the models to draw conclusions from data and express confidence in the modeling process.

Students need to have access to a calculator (preferably a TI-83) and a spreadsheet software package (preferably Excel). They will be provided with a book and a software package.

Students will be evaluated on assignments, projects, weekly quizzes, unit tests, semester exams, and their contribution to discussions.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Colleen Werner
Ipswich High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Statistics Section EW
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Algebra II
Description: This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four themes:

Exploring data: students observe patterns in data, conjecture about relationships of variables.

Planning a study: students develop a plan to identify variables related to a conjecture and devise a means to measure them.

Anticipating patterns: students will develop mathematics models and simulations.

Statistical inference: students will use the models to draw conclusions from data and express confidence in the modeling process.

Students need to have access to a calculator (preferably a TI-83) and a spreadsheet software package (preferably Excel). They will be provided with a book and a software package.

Students will be evaluated on assignments, projects, weekly quizzes, unit tests, semester exams, and their contribution to discussions.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Barbara Mckeon
Doherty High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: AP® Statistics Section EW
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Algebra II
Description: This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four themes:

Exploring data: students observe patterns in data, conjecture about relationships of variables.

Planning a study: students develop a plan to identify variables related to a conjecture and devise a means to measure them.

Anticipating patterns: students will develop mathematics models and simulations.

Statistical inference: students will use the models to draw conclusions from data and express confidence in the modeling process.

Students need to have access to a calculator (preferably a TI-83) and a spreadsheet software package (preferably Excel). They will be provided with a book and a software package.

Students will be evaluated on assignments, projects, weekly quizzes, unit tests, semester exams, and their contribution to discussions.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Edward Whalen
Doherty High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Statistics Section MD
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Algebra II
Description:
This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four themes:

Exploring data: students observe patterns in data, conjecture about relationships of variables.

Planning a study: students develop a plan to identify variables related to a conjecture and devise a means to measure them.

Anticipating patterns: students will develop mathematics models and simulations.

Statistical inference: students will use the models to draw conclusions from data and express confidence in the modeling process.

Students need to have access to a calculator (preferably a TI-83) and a spreadsheet software package (preferably Excel). They will be provided with a book and a software package.

Students will be evaluated on assignments, projects, weekly quizzes, unit tests, semester exams, and their contribution to discussions.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Michael Ditzel
Hampden Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® Statistics Section NK
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Algebra II
Description: This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four themes:

Exploring data: students observe patterns in data, conjecture about relationships of variables.

Planning a study: students develop a plan to identify variables related to a conjecture and devise a means to measure them.

Anticipating patterns: students will develop mathematics models and simulations.

Statistical inference: students will use the models to draw conclusions from data and express confidence in the modeling process.

Students need to have access to a calculator (preferably a TI-83) and a spreadsheet software package (preferably Excel). They will be provided with a book and a software package.

Students will be evaluated on assignments, projects, weekly quizzes, unit tests, semester exams, and their contribution to discussions.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Nathan Kidwell
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® U.S. History Section AA
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: This is a college level history course designed to meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in history. The student is expected to read and analyze both primary and secondary source materials and to demonstrate ability to interpret and evaluate these sources in essay form. Students will take the Advanced Placement American History exam in May, as preparation for this exam is a major goal of this course. Therefore, the course is content driven with heavy emphasis on written critical analysis. Extensive reading writing and class discussions are integral components of the program.

Students should expect 40-50 pages of reading weekly.

The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials- their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance- and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP United States History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in an essay format.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Amy Acors
Fauquier County Public Schools


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® U.S. History Section GA
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: This is a college level history course designed to meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in history. The student is expected to read and analyze both primary and secondary source materials and to demonstrate ability to interpret and evaluate these sources in essay form. Students will take the Advanced Placement American History exam in May, as preparation for this exam is a major goal of this course. Therefore, the course is content driven with heavy emphasis on written critical analysis. Extensive reading writing and class discussions are integral components of the program.

Students should expect 40-50 pages of reading weekly.

The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials- their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance- and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP United States History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in an essay format.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Gregg Anderson
Tantasqua Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® World History Section JM
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Technical Requirements: Power Point , the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.
To use all of the features of MyHistoryLab and the on-line text, they will need the following plug-ins: Adobe Acrobat Reader and Flash.
Description: This is a college level history course designed to meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. The student is expected to read and analyze both primary and secondary source materials and to demonstrate ability to interpret and evaluate these sources in essay form. Students will take the Advanced Placement World History exam in May, as preparation for this exam is a major goal of this course. Therefore, the course is content driven with heavy emphasis on written critical analysis. Extensive reading writing and class discussions are integral components of the program.

Students should expect 40-50 pages of reading weekly.

The AP program in World History is designed develop a greater understanding of human societies. The course covers world history from approximately 8,000 B.C.E. to the present.

The following themes will be highlighted throughout the course:

*Patterns and impacts of interaction among major societies: trade, war, diplomacy, and international organizations.

*The relationship of change and continuity across the world history periods covered in this course.

*The impact of technology and demography on people and the environment (population growth and decline, disease, manufacturing, migrations, agriculture, weaponry).

*Systems of social structure and gender structure (comparing major features within and among societies and assessing change).

*Cultural and intellectual developments and interactions among and within societies.

*Changes in functions and structures of states and changes in attitudes toward states and political identities (political culture), including the emergence of the nation-state (types of political organization).

The following habits of mind will be practiced throughout the course:

*Constructing and evaluating arguments, using evidence to make plausible arguments.

*Using documents and other primary data: developing the skills necessary to analyze point of view, context and bias, and to understand and interpret information.

*Developing the ability to assess issues of change and continuity over time.

*Enhancing the capacity to handle diversity of interpretations through analysis of context, bias, and frame of reference.

*Seeing global patterns over time and space, while acquiring the ability to connect local developments to global ones and to move through levels of generalizations from the global to the particular.

*Developing the ability to compare within and among societies, including comparing societies’ reactions to global processes.

*Developing the ability to assess claims of universal standards, yet remaining aware of human commonalities and differences;

*Putting culturally diverse ideas and values in historical context, not by suspending judgment, but by developing understanding.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Jennifer MacKenzie
New Fairfield High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® World History Section JM2
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Technical Requirements: Power Point , the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.
To use all of the features of MyHistoryLab and the on-line text, they will need the following plug-ins: Adobe Acrobat Reader and Flash.
Description: This is a college level history course designed to meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. The student is expected to read and analyze both primary and secondary source materials and to demonstrate ability to interpret and evaluate these sources in essay form. Students will take the Advanced Placement World History exam in May, as preparation for this exam is a major goal of this course. Therefore, the course is content driven with heavy emphasis on written critical analysis. Extensive reading writing and class discussions are integral components of the program.

Students should expect 40-50 pages of reading weekly.

The AP program in World History is designed develop a greater understanding of human societies. The course covers world history from approximately 8,000 B.C.E. to the present.

The following themes will be highlighted throughout the course:

*Patterns and impacts of interaction among major societies: trade, war, diplomacy, and international organizations.

*The relationship of change and continuity across the world history periods covered in this course.

*The impact of technology and demography on people and the environment (population growth and decline, disease, manufacturing, migrations, agriculture, weaponry).

*Systems of social structure and gender structure (comparing major features within and among societies and assessing change).

*Cultural and intellectual developments and interactions among and within societies.

*Changes in functions and structures of states and changes in attitudes toward states and political identities (political culture), including the emergence of the nation-state (types of political organization).

The following habits of mind will be practiced throughout the course:

*Constructing and evaluating arguments, using evidence to make plausible arguments.

*Using documents and other primary data: developing the skills necessary to analyze point of view, context and bias, and to understand and interpret information.

*Developing the ability to assess issues of change and continuity over time.

*Enhancing the capacity to handle diversity of interpretations through analysis of context, bias, and frame of reference.

*Seeing global patterns over time and space, while acquiring the ability to connect local developments to global ones and to move through levels of generalizations from the global to the particular.

*Developing the ability to compare within and among societies, including comparing societies’ reactions to global processes.

*Developing the ability to assess claims of universal standards, yet remaining aware of human commonalities and differences;

*Putting culturally diverse ideas and values in historical context, not by suspending judgment, but by developing understanding.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Jennifer MacKenzie
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® World History Section KA
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Technical Requirements: Power Point , the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.
To use all of the features of MyHistoryLab and the on-line text, they will need the following plug-ins: Adobe Acrobat Reader and Flash.
Description: This is a college level history course designed to meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. The student is expected to read and analyze both primary and secondary source materials and to demonstrate ability to interpret and evaluate these sources in essay form. Students will take the Advanced Placement World History exam in May, as preparation for this exam is a major goal of this course. Therefore, the course is content driven with heavy emphasis on written critical analysis. Extensive reading writing and class discussions are integral components of the program.

Students should expect 40-50 pages of reading weekly.

The AP program in World History is designed develop a greater understanding of human societies. The course covers world history from approximately 8,000 B.C.E. to the present.

The following themes will be highlighted throughout the course:

*Patterns and impacts of interaction among major societies: trade, war, diplomacy, and international organizations.

*The relationship of change and continuity across the world history periods covered in this course.

*The impact of technology and demography on people and the environment (population growth and decline, disease, manufacturing, migrations, agriculture, weaponry).

*Systems of social structure and gender structure (comparing major features within and among societies and assessing change).

*Cultural and intellectual developments and interactions among and within societies.

*Changes in functions and structures of states and changes in attitudes toward states and political identities (political culture), including the emergence of the nation-state (types of political organization).

The following habits of mind will be practiced throughout the course:

*Constructing and evaluating arguments, using evidence to make plausible arguments.

*Using documents and other primary data: developing the skills necessary to analyze point of view, context and bias, and to understand and interpret information.

*Developing the ability to assess issues of change and continuity over time.

*Enhancing the capacity to handle diversity of interpretations through analysis of context, bias, and frame of reference.

*Seeing global patterns over time and space, while acquiring the ability to connect local developments to global ones and to move through levels of generalizations from the global to the particular.

*Developing the ability to compare within and among societies, including comparing societies’ reactions to global processes.

*Developing the ability to assess claims of universal standards, yet remaining aware of human commonalities and differences;

*Putting culturally diverse ideas and values in historical context, not by suspending judgment, but by developing understanding.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Kelly Angell
St. Dominic Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: AP® World History Section LM
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Advanced placement
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Technical Requirements: Power Point , the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.
To use all of the features of MyHistoryLab and the on-line text, they will need the following plug-ins: Adobe Acrobat Reader and Flash.
Description: This is a college level history course designed to meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. The student is expected to read and analyze both primary and secondary source materials and to demonstrate ability to interpret and evaluate these sources in essay form. Students will take the Advanced Placement World History exam in May, as preparation for this exam is a major goal of this course. Therefore, the course is content driven with heavy emphasis on written critical analysis. Extensive reading writing and class discussions are integral components of the program.

Students should expect 40-50 pages of reading weekly.

The AP program in World History is designed develop a greater understanding of human societies. The course covers world history from approximately 8,000 B.C.E. to the present.

The following themes will be highlighted throughout the course:

*Patterns and impacts of interaction among major societies: trade, war, diplomacy, and international organizations.

*The relationship of change and continuity across the world history periods covered in this course.

*The impact of technology and demography on people and the environment (population growth and decline, disease, manufacturing, migrations, agriculture, weaponry).

*Systems of social structure and gender structure (comparing major features within and among societies and assessing change).

*Cultural and intellectual developments and interactions among and within societies.

*Changes in functions and structures of states and changes in attitudes toward states and political identities (political culture), including the emergence of the nation-state (types of political organization).

The following habits of mind will be practiced throughout the course:

*Constructing and evaluating arguments, using evidence to make plausible arguments.

*Using documents and other primary data: developing the skills necessary to analyze point of view, context and bias, and to understand and interpret information.

*Developing the ability to assess issues of change and continuity over time.

*Enhancing the capacity to handle diversity of interpretations through analysis of context, bias, and frame of reference.

*Seeing global patterns over time and space, while acquiring the ability to connect local developments to global ones and to move through levels of generalizations from the global to the particular.

*Developing the ability to compare within and among societies, including comparing societies’ reactions to global processes.

*Developing the ability to assess claims of universal standards, yet remaining aware of human commonalities and differences;

*Putting culturally diverse ideas and values in historical context, not by suspending judgment, but by developing understanding.

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement VHS courses are required to take the AP exam, and are required to report their AP examination scores to VHS (note: students who are failing their AP class are not required to take the exam). Upon receipt of the student's exam score, each score will be recorded by VHS and assigned an anonymous tracking number to ensure student anonymity and confidentiality. By enrolling in an AP VHS class, the student authorizes their school site coordinator and school administration to report AP examination scores to VHS. Exam results will not affect the student's VHS grade or future enrollment in VHS courses.Larissa Murphy
Leominster High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Around the World in 80 Days Section LC
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Desire to read and use the Internet
Description: Visit the world of Jules Verne during the 1870's through reading the pocket novel, Around the World in 80 Days. Even if you have read the novel or seen the movie starring David Niven, you will explore through Internet websites, reference resources, and movies, the people, places, religion, cultures, and methods of transportation that Phileas Fogg confronted in his travel around the world. You will discover a world at the height of the British Empire and in the midst of American Expansion. Compare transportation by ship, locomotive, and beast as you visit France, Egypt, India, Hong Kong, and the United States. Learn about the religions of India and confront Kali, the goddess depicted in the movie, Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom! Now, let us depart, as we read and write about our journey around the world in 80 days!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Laura Carlyle
Sandwich High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Around the World in 80 Days Section LC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Desire to read and use the Internet
Description: Visit the world of Jules Verne during the 1870's through reading the pocket novel, Around the World in 80 Days. Even if you have read the novel or seen the movie starring David Niven, you will explore through Internet websites, reference resources, and movies, the people, places, religion, cultures, and methods of transportation that Phileas Fogg confronted in his travel around the world. You will discover a world at the height of the British Empire and in the midst of American Expansion. Compare transportation by ship, locomotive, and beast as you visit France, Egypt, India, Hong Kong, and the United States. Learn about the religions of India and confront Kali, the goddess depicted in the movie, Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom! Now, let us depart, as we read and write about our journey around the world in 80 days!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Laura Carlyle
Sandwich High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Art History Section DL
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Solid writing and reading skills, an interest in art, access to a scanner, Windows Media Player or an equivalent program, and ability to attach images.
It is strongly recommended that students have access to a digital camera.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Ever wonder why Impressionists seem so mundane now but were so shocking in their day? Why did that guy Pollock toss and drip all that paint around and get paid a lot of money for it? What was all the hoopla at the Brooklyn Museum a few years ago?

This course is designed to emulate a college level 'survey' course in Art History that will answer these questions and raise a few more. It begins in the Renaissance in Western Europe, because 1500 was an important moment for Western culture, and finishes off the second half of the millennium. We'll visit museums all over the world, virtually of course, and look at the connections among various types of art that have been created for the past 500 years. This course is a great way to expand your understanding of history as well as your understanding and love of visual art. If you like looking at works of art and wondering what on earth the artist was trying to communicate, this is the course for you!

As in any art history course, images of the nude human figure will be viewed and discussed. Some controversial topics will be raised during the course, particularly when we discuss censorship and contemporary art.

WARNING: Pulling images up from the Internet can take an EXTREMELY long time if you don't have an adequate high speed Internet connection as well as memory on your computer. Check to make sure the equipment available to you won't leave you snoring while you wait for a peek at the "Mona Lisa!"

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Desiree Luszcz
Manville High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Art History Section LD
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Solid writing and reading skills, an interest in art, access to a scanner, Windows Media Player or an equivalent program, and ability to attach images.
It is strongly recommended that students have access to a digital camera.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Ever wonder why Impressionists seem so mundane now but were so shocking in their day? Why did that guy Pollock toss and drip all that paint around and get paid a lot of money for it? What was all the hoopla at the Brooklyn Museum a few years ago?

This course is designed to emulate a college level 'survey' course in Art History that will answer these questions and raise a few more. It begins in the Renaissance in Western Europe, because 1500 was an important moment for Western culture, and finishes off the second half of the millennium. We'll visit museums all over the world, virtually of course, and look at the connections among various types of art that have been created for the past 500 years. This course is a great way to expand your understanding of history as well as your understanding and love of visual art. If you like looking at works of art and wondering what on earth the artist was trying to communicate, this is the course for you!

As in any art history course, images of the nude human figure will be viewed and discussed. Some controversial topics will be raised during the course, particularly when we discuss censorship and contemporary art.

WARNING: Pulling images up from the Internet can take an EXTREMELY long time if you don't have an adequate high speed Internet connection as well as memory on your computer. Check to make sure the equipment available to you won't leave you snoring while you wait for a peek at the "Mona Lisa!"

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Leone Donovan
Kennebec Valley Alliance


* - - - *

Course Title: Art History Section LL
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Solid writing and reading skills, an interest in art, access to a scanner, Windows Media Player or an equivalent program, and ability to attach images.
It is strongly recommended that students have access to a digital camera.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Ever wonder why Impressionists seem so mundane now but were so shocking in their day? Why did that guy Pollock toss and drip all that paint around and get paid a lot of money for it? What was all the hoopla at the Brooklyn Museum a few years ago?

This course is designed to emulate a college level 'survey' course in Art History that will answer these questions and raise a few more. It begins in the Renaissance in Western Europe, because 1500 was an important moment for Western culture, and finishes off the second half of the millennium. We'll visit museums all over the world, virtually of course, and look at the connections among various types of art that have been created for the past 500 years. This course is a great way to expand your understanding of history as well as your understanding and love of visual art. If you like looking at works of art and wondering what on earth the artist was trying to communicate, this is the course for you!

As in any art history course, images of the nude human figure will be viewed and discussed. Some controversial topics will be raised during the course, particularly when we discuss censorship and contemporary art.

WARNING: Pulling images up from the Internet can take an EXTREMELY long time if you don't have an adequate high speed Internet connection as well as memory on your computer. Check to make sure the equipment available to you won't leave you snoring while you wait for a peek at the "Mona Lisa!"

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Laura De La Llave
Coventry High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Art History: Art of the Caribbean Islands Section SE
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An Interest in Art, Writing and Reading Skills. Experience navigating and doing searches on the Internet.
Description: What is "Caribbean Art"? Is it indigenous art? Little statues and paintings found in caverns? Was Jean-Michel Basquiat a New Yorker or a true Caribbean artist? Find these answers and more in this course where we are going to explore the mixture of different origins that make up art in the Caribbean, an area comprised of more than 20 islands including Bermuda, Jamaica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Puerto Rico. We'll cover the Spanish colonial period to the present, and look at African, Amerindian, Asian and European influences on Caribbean art. We'll also tour some of the most amazing virtual museums and artists' websites where debates are going to be raised on specific paintings. While surfing on the net, your art appreciation skills and vocabulary are going to be trained and exercised. Whether you are an art lover, don't want to feel lost next time you go to a museum, or just want to know how to recognize art from different backgrounds and styles, this Caribbean Art course is designed for you!

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Susan Ettenheim
Eleanor Roosevelt High School


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Course Title: Arts and Ideas Section AF: The Best of Western Culture
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students may need to download a variety of plug-ins to view slides and listen to music selections online. Further information on these will be provided within the course.
Description: Students will take a guided tour through the best of western culture in which they will taste arts, architecture, music, literature, history, religion, and philosophy from ancient times into the twenty-first century. Western Culture and Humanities is for students who like to study how arts, ideas, inventions, and events all connect. Students will:

· Read and respond to text and online verbal, visual, and auditory sources
· Visit virtual museums and cultural websites
· Share active class "discussions" online
· Work with other students online in student-selected investigations and presentations
· Synthesize ideas and develop writing skills in individual short essays

Course Bias: Open Minds and Kindness. While the course focuses on the best of the arts in western culture, the student and parent should be aware that the texts and some websites include artistic historical nudes. The course instructor will encourage students to investigate many artistic and social orientations as valid within the culture of origin. Maintaining open minds and withholding judgment in order to understand what contributions have been made in the past are biases encouraged throughout the course. In addition, students will be required to maintain courteous and encouraging tones toward all others as they discuss their personal responses to works.

Note: NCAA approval listed under "Western Culture Humanities". Ashley Frame
Nute Middle High School


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Course Title: Assabet Biology A Section AF Private Offering
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Familiarity with an Internet browser, ability to read and write on grade level.
Description: This credit recovery course begins with the Chemistry of Life, and then covers Cell Biology as well as the History and Diversity of Life. Students are asked to view videos, tutorials and animations, play biology games and complete simulations. Most assignments have follow-up activities that include 3-2-1 key fact assignments, automated quizzes, vocabulary word walls, and concept maps. At the end of each week, students complete a weekly quiz to test their knowledge of the content and are asked to reflect on their performance. At the end of each unit, students reflect on the content of the unit in a class discussion and complete a unit test.

This course is designed to complement a traditional biology class that uses the Glencoe Biology, 2009 textbook and resources.Alexia Forhan
Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School


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Course Title: Astronomy Principles Section AV
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Physics recommended but not required
Description: This course is an introduction to the basic techniques and current knowledge of astronomy. Students will learn to observe the sky and how the sky appears to change over time. They will see how models that predict and explain these changes developed. The students will also study how the physical properties of the solar system, the Milky Way galaxy, and the universe are observed, measured and modeled.

Instruction will be based on readings and questions found in a textbook, on-line sources, and a CD-ROM that accompanies the text. WARNING: The textbook will be used as a REFERENCE - it is not meant to read as a novel or a piece of nonfiction. We will be starting at the beginning of the text but will jump around it during the first few weeks of the course.

Students will be evaluated on weekly contributions to discussions, reading assignments, homework, paper & pencil activities, computer simulations, weekly quizzes, small group projects a midterm and final exams.William Luzader
Virtual High School


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Course Title: Astronomy Principles Section KT
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Physics recommended but not required
Description: This course is an introduction to astronomy. Student will learn how to observe the sky we see and how it appears to change over time. Then they will learn more about the planets of our solar system and the structure and life of stars. Lastly students will study the Milky Way galaxy as well as those beyond and end by looking to the future.

Student will be evaluated on weekly contributions to discussions, reading assignments, regular observation assignments in their Sky Watch journal and other activities and assignments. Activities will involve virtual labs, web inquiries, and using planetarium software. There will be a mid-term and final project. Kim Trinklein
Bethel High School


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Course Title: Astronomy Principles Section WL
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Physics recommended but not required
Description: This course is an introduction to astronomy. Student will learn how to observe the sky we see and how it appears to change over time. Then they will learn more about the planets of our solar system and the structure and life of stars. Lastly students will study the Milky Way galaxy as well as those beyond and end by looking to the future.

Student will be evaluated on weekly contributions to discussions, reading assignments, regular observation assignments in their Sky Watch journal and other activities and assignments. Activities will involve virtual labs, web inquiries, and using planetarium software. There will be a mid-term and final project. William Luzader
Plymouth Public Schools


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Course Title: Bad Boys in Literature Section BH
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: What is it that makes Bad Boys so fascinating? Why are horror movies so popular? Why is there evil in the world? In this course you will read four novels (A Separate Peace, Frankenstein, Lord of the Flies) and two short stories ("The Secret Sharer", "Heart of Darkness") which portray both the positive and negative characteristics of human beings in different situations. You will analyze the ways the authors develop those characteristics. Then you will examine current entertainment media as they exhibit the characteristics of these literary works. You will examine the extent to which a connection can be made between the literary or entertainment portrayal of the nature of man and trends toward or away from violence that can be seen in society. As we look at these works, we will also be looking at ourselves and those around us to see how the Dark Side shows itself outside of literature. Are we really all "savages underneath"? Beth Hughes
Wakefield Public Schools


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Course Title: Basic Chemistry Summer Offering
Discipline: Science - Chemistry
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites:
Description: The major goal of Basic Chemistry is to introduce students to the fundamental aspects of chemistry while broadening their appreciation for the applications of chemistry in their lives. This four week course includes modules on properties of Matter, Measurement and the Mole, Atomic Structure, Nuclear Structure and Electrons, the Periodic Table and Chemical Reactions, and Bonding and Solutions. Students will complete virtual demonstrations and activities, view simulations and videos, listen to podcasts, conduct research and discuss concepts with their peers.

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Steven Perrin
Virtual High School


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Course Title: Bioethics Section AS
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Are you prepared for a brave new world? Some say that the age that will come after the information age will be known as the age of biology. Already, we hear about euthanasia, stem cells, genes, genomes, and health care in the news almost nightly. The ethical issues that accompany these new technologies force us to reexamine what words like “humanity”, “person”, “respect”', “fair”, “justice”, and “benefit” mean.
This is a survey course covering various contemporary topics in bioethics, focusing on issues encountered in biomedicine, genetics and research. Areas to be studied include assisted reproductive technology, end-of-life decision making, gene therapy, genetically modified organism, stem cells and animal and human research. We will examine these issues from many sides, weighing the reasons people have for believing them with a mind towards forming a well-supported position and creating a brave new world in which we can all live in the age of biology.Amy Sunke
Appleton eSchool


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Course Title: Bioethics Section CD
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Are you prepared for a brave new world? Some say that the age that will come after the information age will be known as the age of biology. Already, we hear about euthanasia, stem cells, genes, genomes, and health care in the news almost nightly. The ethical issues that accompany these new technologies force us to reexamine what words like “humanity”, “person”, “respect”', “fair”, “justice”, and “benefit” mean.
This is a survey course covering various contemporary topics in bioethics, focusing on issues encountered in biomedicine, genetics and research. Areas to be studied include assisted reproductive technology, end-of-life decision making, gene therapy, genetically modified organism, stem cells and animal and human research. We will examine these issues from many sides, weighing the reasons people have for believing them with a mind towards forming a well-supported position and creating a brave new world in which we can all live in the age of biology.Christina Drumm
Eugene Public School District 4J


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Course Title: Bioethics Section SM
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Are you prepared for a brave new world? Some say that the age that will come after the information age will be known as the age of biology. Already, we hear about euthanasia, stem cells, genes, genomes, and health care in the news almost nightly. The ethical issues that accompany these new technologies force us to reexamine what words like “humanity”, “person”, “respect”', “fair”, “justice”, and “benefit” mean.
This is a survey course covering various contemporary topics in bioethics, focusing on issues encountered in biomedicine, genetics and research. Areas to be studied include assisted reproductive technology, end-of-life decision making, gene therapy, genetically modified organism, stem cells and animal and human research. We will examine these issues from many sides, weighing the reasons people have for believing them with a mind towards forming a well-supported position and creating a brave new world in which we can all live in the age of biology.Shari Mccarthy
Bartlett Jr. Sr. High School


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Course Title: Biology Section TH
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Familiarity with an Internet browser, ability to read and write on grade level.
Description: This full year standard level biology course covers the Chemistry of Life, Cell Biology and Ecology in the first semester and Molecular Biology and Genetics, Evolution and the Diversity of Life, and Human Anatomy and Physiology in the second semester. Students are asked to view videos, tutorials, animations, play biology games, and complete simulations and virtual labs. Assignments include weekly discussions, 3-2-1 key fact assignments, assignment quizzes, lab activities, vocabulary word walls, and concept maps. Students share information and collaborate via discussion forums, blogs and wikis. Students complete weekly quizzes at the end of each week as well as a unit test at the end of each unit.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Timothy Haire
Southbridge High School


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Course Title: Biology Summer Offering
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer School Extended Session
Prerequisites:
Description: This course begins with Cell Biology and then covers Molecular Biology and Genetics, Evolution and Diversity of Life and Ecology. Students are asked to view videos, tutorials and animations, play biology games and complete simulations. Most assignments have follow-up activities that include 3-2-1 key fact assignments, automated quizzes, vocabulary word walls, and concept maps. At the end of each week, students complete a weekly quiz to test their knowledge of the content and are asked to reflect on their performance. At the end of each unit, students reflect on the content of the unit in a class discussion and complete a unit test.

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.

Please note that because this course is eight weeks in duration, and students are expected to work approximately ten hours per week, the course will therefore not cover a full year's curriculum with the same depth that is covered in a year-long course. In addition, if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Christine Colella
Virtual High School


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Course Title: Biotechnology Section AD
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic Biology; desire to learn to write about science
Technical Requirements: VDNA Software download (free)
Description: Nearly every day there is amazing news about biotechnology and genetic engineering. This is an exciting, dynamic area that includes many applications that we hear about often – cloning, stem cells, genetically engineered plants and animals, DNA fingerprinting and forensics, gene therapy, and the Human Genome Project. This course is intended to provide you with an overview of biotechnology, starting with a review of DNA structure and function and extending to the current research ongoing in the field.

Biotechnology is a course designed to familiarize you with these current innovative technologies based on our use of the DNA molecule. You will examine the opportunities and challenges that these abilities have created for us all. You will look at the techniques that are used in biotechnology and will also see just what kind of work modern biotech companies are involved in.

In this class, we will be looking at how scientists use or plan to use DNA in all sorts of fascinating ways. We have all heard of DNA fingerprinting, but there are many, many other ways in which DNA is being used these days, and that's what we'll be looking at in this course, from DNA vaccines to cell therapy to genetically engineered corn.Amanda Dinger
Plymouth South High School


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Course Title: Biotechnology Section WP
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic Biology; desire to learn to write about science
Technical Requirements: VDNA Software download (free)
Description: Nearly every day there is amazing news about biotechnology and genetic engineering. This is an exciting, dynamic area that includes many applications that we hear about often – cloning, stem cells, genetically engineered plants and animals, DNA fingerprinting and forensics, gene therapy, and the Human Genome Project. This course is intended to provide you with an overview of biotechnology, starting with a review of DNA structure and function and extending to the current research ongoing in the field.

Biotechnology is a course designed to familiarize you with these current innovative technologies based on our use of the DNA molecule. You will examine the opportunities and challenges that these abilities have created for us all. You will look at the techniques that are used in biotechnology and will also see just what kind of work modern biotech companies are involved in.

In this class, we will be looking at how scientists use or plan to use DNA in all sorts of fascinating ways. We have all heard of DNA fingerprinting, but there are many, many other ways in which DNA is being used these days, and that's what we'll be looking at in this course, from DNA vaccines to cell therapy to genetically engineered corn.William Peace
Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School


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Course Title: Blogs, Wikis, and Web Research Tools
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An interest in research and how technology affects you and your world
Description: In "Blogs, Wikis, and Web Tools: Research in a Digital Age" you will collaborate with other students to conduct research around a chosen topic of interest. You will get suggestions from your classmates and work closely with your teacher, as your subject of interest comes to life. In this course you will become an effective researcher, as you explore the web-based resources available on your topic. All students will work in teams to define their topic, conduct preliminary searches, develop their research question, gather information from a variety of online resources, organize and synthesize their findings, and create a final project that contributes to the body of knowledge about their chosen topic.

If you have ever wanted to find out more about a topic that interests you while working closely with students who share common interests and using Web 2.0 tools, "Blogs, Wikis, and Web Tools: Research in a Digital Age" is the course for you!
Joyce Wheeler
Scarborough High School


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Course Title: Blogs, Wikis, and Web Research Tools
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An interest in research and how technology affects you and your world
Description: In "Blogs, Wikis, and Web Tools: Research in a Digital Age" you will collaborate with other students to conduct research around a chosen topic of interest. You will get suggestions from your classmates and work closely with your teacher, as your subject of interest comes to life. In this course you will become an effective researcher, as you explore the web-based resources available on your topic. All students will work in teams to define their topic, conduct preliminary searches, develop their research question, gather information from a variety of online resources, organize and synthesize their findings, and create a final project that contributes to the body of knowledge about their chosen topic.

If you have ever wanted to find out more about a topic that interests you while working closely with students who share common interests and using Web 2.0 tools, "Blogs, Wikis, and Web Tools: Research in a Digital Age" is the course for you!
Joyce Wheeler
Scarborough High School


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Course Title: Business and Personal Law Section CP
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: The ability to participate in discussions regarding the law in a mature manner. Students should have an interest in legal issues and a desire to learn about legal concepts that will impact their lives on a personal level and within the business community. Students should be comfortable with keyboarding. The course will require written work and weekly discussions. Case studies and debates will be part of this course. Students will need to defend their position and ideas. Self-evaluation will be stressed within the course. The class should take a minimum of 5 to 8 hours per week.
Description: Business/Personal Law is designed for students who have a desire to learn more about legal issues that will affect them in the present and in the future. It will acquaint students with basic legal principles common to business and personal issues. Ethics, the origin of law, our court system structure, contracting, buying and selling, employment, organizing a business, real estate, wills, trust, and marriage and divorce will be explored. Students will leave the course with an understanding of legal issues impacting their lives in today's world. They will leave the course with an understanding and preparedness to face future legal issues.Chris Pileski
Buckeye Valley High School


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Course Title: Business and Personal Law Section LC
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: The ability to participate in discussions regarding the law in a mature manner. Students should have an interest in legal issues and a desire to learn about legal concepts that will impact their lives on a personal level and within the business community. Students should be comfortable with keyboarding. The course will require written work and weekly discussions. Case studies and debates will be part of this course. Students will need to defend their position and ideas. Self-evaluation will be stressed within the course. The class should take a minimum of 5 to 8 hours per week.
Description: Business/Personal Law is designed for students who have a desire to learn more about legal issues that will affect them in the present and in the future. It will acquaint students with basic legal principles common to business and personal issues. Ethics, the origin of law, our court system structure, contracting, buying and selling, employment, organizing a business, real estate, wills, trust, and marriage and divorce will be explored. Students will leave the course with an understanding of legal issues impacting their lives in today's world. They will leave the course with an understanding and preparedness to face future legal issues.Linda Church
Jonesport-Beals High School


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Course Title: Business and Personal Law Section SC
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: The ability to participate in discussions regarding the law in a mature manner. Students should have an interest in legal issues and a desire to learn about legal concepts that will impact their lives on a personal level and within the business community. Students should be comfortable with keyboarding. The course will require written work and weekly discussions. Case studies and debates will be part of this course. Students will need to defend their position and ideas. Self-evaluation will be stressed within the course. The class should take a minimum of 5 to 8 hours per week.
Description: Business/Personal Law is designed for students who have a desire to learn more about legal issues that will affect them in the present and in the future. It will acquaint students with basic legal principles common to business and personal issues. Ethics, the origin of law, our court system structure, contracting, buying and selling, employment, organizing a business, real estate, wills, trust, and marriage and divorce will be explored. Students will leave the course with an understanding of legal issues impacting their lives in today's world. They will leave the course with an understanding and preparedness to face future legal issues.Sue Comparato
Swampscott High School


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Course Title: Business Math Section DV
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students taking this course should have successfully completed Algebra 1.

Description: What do all successful business people have in common? How can you gain financial security? These are some of the questions that we will answer in Business Math. This course focuses on the application of fundamental arithmetical computations to practical business problems. It’s “math you can use.” Some of the key concepts covered in this course include:
1. A review of basic math skills (calculations involving only addition, subtraction, multiplication and division)
2. How do retail businesses generate profit? From the consumer perspective, you will see how stores decide what items to put on sale and for how much. You’ll learn how your local supermarket knows how to price every item on the shelf so that they maximize their profits.
3. How do banks make money? You’ll learn how your money grows in savings accounts. You will also learn how to figure out how much you should invest now in order to purchase things in the future. Finally, we will investigate how loans work.
4. How do people invest in the stock market? We will look at why companies sell stock. You will learn about the key numbers that stockbrokers track when they are researching companies to invest in. You will get your chance to invest $1,000,000 in our stock market game.
5. How do local and state governments arrive at your tax rate? We will see where the money you make goes.Dorothy Verdy
Millis High School


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Course Title: Business Math Section DV
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students taking this course should have successfully completed Algebra 1.

Description: What do all successful business people have in common? How can you gain financial security? These are some of the questions that we will answer in Business Math. This course focuses on the application of fundamental arithmetical computations to practical business problems. It’s “math you can use.” Some of the key concepts covered in this course include:
1. A review of basic math skills (calculations involving only addition, subtraction, multiplication and division)
2. How do retail businesses generate profit? From the consumer perspective, you will see how stores decide what items to put on sale and for how much. You’ll learn how your local supermarket knows how to price every item on the shelf so that they maximize their profits.
3. How do banks make money? You’ll learn how your money grows in savings accounts. You will also learn how to figure out how much you should invest now in order to purchase things in the future. Finally, we will investigate how loans work.
4. How do people invest in the stock market? We will look at why companies sell stock. You will learn about the key numbers that stockbrokers track when they are researching companies to invest in. You will get your chance to invest $1,000,000 in our stock market game.
5. How do local and state governments arrive at your tax rate? We will see where the money you make goes.Dorothy Verdy
Millis High School


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Course Title: Business Math Section SS
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students taking this course should have successfully completed Algebra 1. Comfortable with computers.

Description: What do all successful business people have in common? How can you gain financial security? These are some of the questions that we will answer in Business Math. This course focuses on the application of fundamental arithmetical computations to practical business problems. It’s “math you can use.” Some of the key concepts covered in this course include:
1. A review of basic math skills (calculations involving only addition, subtraction, multiplication and division)
2. How do retail businesses generate profit? From the consumer perspective, you will see how stores decide what items to put on sale and for how much. You’ll learn how your local supermarket knows how to price every item on the shelf so that they maximize their profits.
3. How do banks make money? You’ll learn how your money grows in savings accounts. You will also learn how to figure out how much you should invest now in order to purchase things in the future. Finally, we will investigate how loans work.
4. How do people invest in the stock market? We will look at why companies sell stock. You will learn about the key numbers that stockbrokers track when they are researching companies to invest in. You will get your chance to invest $1,000,000 in our stock market game.
5. How do local and state governments arrive at your tax rate? We will see where the money you make goes.Stephanie Stockwell
Worcester Technical High School


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Course Title: Business Math Section SS
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students taking this course should have successfully completed Algebra 1. Comfortable with computers.

Description: What do all successful business people have in common? How can you gain financial security? These are some of the questions that we will answer in Business Math. This course focuses on the application of fundamental arithmetical computations to practical business problems. It’s “math you can use.” Some of the key concepts covered in this course include:
1. A review of basic math skills (calculations involving only addition, subtraction, multiplication and division)
2. How do retail businesses generate profit? From the consumer perspective, you will see how stores decide what items to put on sale and for how much. You’ll learn how your local supermarket knows how to price every item on the shelf so that they maximize their profits.
3. How do banks make money? You’ll learn how your money grows in savings accounts. You will also learn how to figure out how much you should invest now in order to purchase things in the future. Finally, we will investigate how loans work.
4. How do people invest in the stock market? We will look at why companies sell stock. You will learn about the key numbers that stockbrokers track when they are researching companies to invest in. You will get your chance to invest $1,000,000 in our stock market game.
5. How do local and state governments arrive at your tax rate? We will see where the money you make goes.Stephanie Stockwell
Worcester Technical High School


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Course Title: Business Math Section SZ
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students taking this course should have successfully completed Algebra 1. Comfortable with computers.

Description: What do all successful business people have in common? How can you gain financial security? These are some of the questions that we will answer in Business Math. This course focuses on the application of fundamental arithmetical computations to practical business problems. It’s “math you can use.” Some of the key concepts covered in this course include:
1. A review of basic math skills (calculations involving only addition, subtraction, multiplication and division)
2. How do retail businesses generate profit? From the consumer perspective, you will see how stores decide what items to put on sale and for how much. You’ll learn how your local supermarket knows how to price every item on the shelf so that they maximize their profits.
3. How do banks make money? You’ll learn how your money grows in savings accounts. You will also learn how to figure out how much you should invest now in order to purchase things in the future. Finally, we will investigate how loans work.
4. How do people invest in the stock market? We will look at why companies sell stock. You will learn about the key numbers that stockbrokers track when they are researching companies to invest in. You will get your chance to invest $1,000,000 in our stock market game.
5. How do local and state governments arrive at your tax rate? We will see where the money you make goes.Sue Zielanski
Bigfork High School


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Course Title: Business Math Section SZ
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students taking this course should have successfully completed Algebra 1. Comfortable with computers.

Description: What do all successful business people have in common? How can you gain financial security? These are some of the questions that we will answer in Business Math. This course focuses on the application of fundamental arithmetical computations to practical business problems. It’s “math you can use.” Some of the key concepts covered in this course include:
1. A review of basic math skills (calculations involving only addition, subtraction, multiplication and division)
2. How do retail businesses generate profit? From the consumer perspective, you will see how stores decide what items to put on sale and for how much. You’ll learn how your local supermarket knows how to price every item on the shelf so that they maximize their profits.
3. How do banks make money? You’ll learn how your money grows in savings accounts. You will also learn how to figure out how much you should invest now in order to purchase things in the future. Finally, we will investigate how loans work.
4. How do people invest in the stock market? We will look at why companies sell stock. You will learn about the key numbers that stockbrokers track when they are researching companies to invest in. You will get your chance to invest $1,000,000 in our stock market game.
5. How do local and state governments arrive at your tax rate? We will see where the money you make goes.Sue Zielanski
Bigfork High School


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Course Title: CAD Section SM
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Creo (formerly ProEngineer) will only run on a PC.

Systems requirements:
Operating Systems Windows® 7 32 and 64-bit Edition of Ultimate, Enterprise, Business, Home Premium
Windows® Vista 32 and 64-bit Edition of Ultimate, Enterprise, Business, Home Premium
Windows® XP™ 32 and 64-bit Editions of Professional and Home(1)
System Memory (RAM) Minimum: 512 MB
Video Display 3D capable graphics card with OpenGL support
CPU Intel Pentium (III, 4, M, D)
Intel Xeon
Intel Celeron
Intel Core
AMD Athlon
AMD Opteron
Note: Single-, dual- and quad-core processors are supported.
Hard Disk Space Minimum: 400 MB
Internet Requirements Active internet connection required for product activation.
Note: Product reactivation is required every three days.
Description: CAD is a fifteen-week course that introduces students to Creo Elements (formerly named ProEngineer) 3D parametric solid modeling software.
Students begin by exploring basic design commands such as lines, circles and rectangles, which are used to create valid sketches. These commands are then applied to create extrusions and other generic three-dimensional objects.

All instruction is found online. There is no book or media kit. Instruction for downloading and installing the software is detailed in Week 2.

*The software Creo is designed by engineers for engineers and may be difficult for students who have no prior experience in Technical Drawing or CAD. It is highly recommended that students are able to install the software both at home and at school.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Steven Martin
Nanuet Senior High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Calculus Honors Section AD: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Geometry, Algebra 2, Trigonometry, access to a graphing calculator and experience using it.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Math is HOT! One of the most popular movies of 1998,"Good Will Hunting," was a story about a math nerd who solves the problem and gets the girl. Wall Street relies on complicated formulas from calculus to predict trends and forecast the likelihood of financial success based on many factors. Books about mathematics and numbers are flying off the shelves at bookstores across the country. A major fragrance manufacturer is busy developing a fragrance for men called "pi." What could explain this mysterious phenomenon? According to National Public Radio, smart is in and so is the study of mathematics.

Introduction to Calculus is designed for students interested in college mathematics and particularly those who can't commit to a full year of study during their senior year. This semester-long course will cover limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications. We will examine the finer points of calculus and look at its specific applications to business and finance along the way.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Amy Dyment
Reading Memorial High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Calculus Honors Section AD: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Geometry, Algebra 2, Trigonometry, access to a graphing calculator and experience using it.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Math is HOT! One of the most popular movies of 1998,"Good Will Hunting," was a story about a math nerd who solves the problem and gets the girl. Wall Street relies on complicated formulas from calculus to predict trends and forecast the likelihood of financial success based on many factors. Books about mathematics and numbers are flying off the shelves at bookstores across the country. A major fragrance manufacturer is busy developing a fragrance for men called "pi." What could explain this mysterious phenomenon? According to National Public Radio, smart is in and so is the study of mathematics.

Introduction to Calculus is designed for students interested in college mathematics and particularly those who can't commit to a full year of study during their senior year. This semester-long course will cover limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications. We will examine the finer points of calculus and look at its specific applications to business and finance along the way.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Amy Dyment
Reading Memorial High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Calculus Honors Section CU: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Geometry, Algebra 2, Trigonometry, access to a graphing calculator and experience using it.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Math is HOT! One of the most popular movies of 1998, "Good Will Hunting," was a story about a math nerd who solves the problem and gets the girl. Wall Street relies on complicated formulas from calculus to predict trends and forecast the likelihood of financial success based on many factors. Books about mathematics and numbers are flying off the shelves at bookstores across the country. A major fragrance manufacturer is busy developing a fragrance for men called "pi." What could explain this mysterious phenomenon? According to National Public Radio, smart is in and so is the study of mathematics.

Introduction to Calculus is designed for students interested in college mathematics and particularly those who can't commit to a full year of study during their senior year. This semester-long course will cover limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications. We will examine the finer points of calculus and look at its specific applications to business and finance along the way.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Christopher Underwood
Grafton High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Calculus Honors Section CU: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Geometry, Algebra 2, Trigonometry, access to a graphing calculator and experience using it.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Math is HOT! One of the most popular movies of 1998, "Good Will Hunting," was a story about a math nerd who solves the problem and gets the girl. Wall Street relies on complicated formulas from calculus to predict trends and forecast the likelihood of financial success based on many factors. Books about mathematics and numbers are flying off the shelves at bookstores across the country. A major fragrance manufacturer is busy developing a fragrance for men called "pi." What could explain this mysterious phenomenon? According to National Public Radio, smart is in and so is the study of mathematics.

Introduction to Calculus is designed for students interested in college mathematics and particularly those who can't commit to a full year of study during their senior year. This semester-long course will cover limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications. We will examine the finer points of calculus and look at its specific applications to business and finance along the way.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Christopher Underwood
Grafton High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Career Awareness Section BA
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: ** Juniors and seniors interested in this class should enroll in Now What Will You Do? Life After High School**

Prepare now for success in the New Millennium. Whether you plan to go to college, to seek immediate job opportunity or you're just not sure - this course will show you the way.
* Explore topics ranging from self-awareness to career awareness.
* Learn important test-taking skills (including SAT).
* Discover your learning styles and personality traits.
* Master time management skills for use in the classroom now and in future careers.
* Find out about the hot career choices for the new millennium
If you would like a course that helps you learn about yourself while you prepare for the future, this is it!
By the end of the semester, each student will have an individualized career plan to help ensure success in the highly competitive 21st Century.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Beth Allen
Whitinsville Christian School


* - - - *

Course Title: Career Awareness Section MG
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: ** Juniors and seniors interested in this class should enroll in Now What Will You Do? Life After High School**

Prepare now for success in the New Millennium. Whether you plan to go to college, to seek immediate job opportunity or you're just not sure - this course will show you the way.

* Explore topics ranging from self-awareness to career awareness.
* Learn important test-taking skills (including SAT).
* Discover your learning styles and personality traits.
* Master time management skills for use in the classroom now and in future careers.
* Find out about the hot career choices for the new millennium

If you would like a course that helps you learn about yourself while you prepare for the future, this is it! By the end of the semester, each student will have an individualized career plan to help ensure success in the highly competitive 21st Century.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Marcia Grant
Arthur W Coolidge Middle School


* - - - *

Course Title: Chemistry Honors Section CB: An Introduction
Discipline: Science - Chemistry
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Strong Math Skills - Recommended to have completed Algebra
Students need access to a basic scientific calculator to complete calculations. Student computers also need to have Java enabled so that they can view and complete certain assignments. A few household items will be needed to perform basic lab activities. Details will be provided in the starting weeks of the course.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Chemistry Honors: An Introduction, is an introductory look at basic chemical principles. This includes a study of matter and its interactions, while considering methods that chemically alter matter in hopes of meeting noble, futuristic goals of our society. We'll also examine the positives and negatives of living in a technically-advanced, industrialized world. This course covers a variety of chemistry topics, including examining the innermost workings of an atom by studying nuclear chemistry and applying that knowledge to applications of nuclear technology in the world today. Students will also examine properties of matter, the interactions between atoms and the periodic table of the elements. Also included in this course will be mathematical calculations related to chemical quantities as well as stoichiometry (the calculations using balanced chemical equations). The course closes with a look at phases of matter and the chemistry of gases. This course requires students to complete a number of laboratory activities using common household materials. Students are expected to supply common items such as, vinegar, Styrofoam cups, baking soda, etc. Details will be provided in the starting weeks of the course.

This course focuses on group work, as well as individual work. Students will work together to process and compare experimental data. There are several mini-projects, whereby students work within teams to complete assignments. One mini-project extends over several weeks. No prior chemistry experience is necessary, but a strong math background and curiosity about the natural world are beneficial!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Cameron Brown
Hopedale Jr Sr High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Chemistry Honors Section CB: An Introduction
Discipline: Science - Chemistry
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Strong Math Skills - Recommended to have completed Algebra
Students need access to a basic scientific calculator to complete calculations. Student computers also need to have Java enabled so that they can view and complete certain assignments. A few household items will be needed to perform basic lab activities. Details will be provided in the starting weeks of the course.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Chemistry Honors: An Introduction, is an introductory look at basic chemical principles. This includes a study of matter and its interactions, while considering methods that chemically alter matter in hopes of meeting noble, futuristic goals of our society. We'll also examine the positives and negatives of living in a technically-advanced, industrialized world. This course covers a variety of chemistry topics, including examining the innermost workings of an atom by studying nuclear chemistry and applying that knowledge to applications of nuclear technology in the world today. Students will also examine properties of matter, the interactions between atoms and the periodic table of the elements. Also included in this course will be mathematical calculations related to chemical quantities as well as stoichiometry (the calculations using balanced chemical equations). The course closes with a look at phases of matter and the chemistry of gases. This course requires students to complete a number of laboratory activities using common household materials. Students are expected to supply common items such as, vinegar, Styrofoam cups, baking soda, etc. Details will be provided in the starting weeks of the course.

This course focuses on group work, as well as individual work. Students will work together to process and compare experimental data. There are several mini-projects, whereby students work within teams to complete assignments. One mini-project extends over several weeks. No prior chemistry experience is necessary, but a strong math background and curiosity about the natural world are beneficial!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Cameron Brown
Hopedale Jr Sr High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Computational Science and Engineering Using Java Section BT1
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Two years of algebra, one year of geometry, one year of a laboratory science; the class is designed as a first course in programming for science and engineering--the class is not intended for students who have completed an Advanced Placement course in computer science
Description: This course is an introduction to computational science, an interdisciplinary method of scientific inquiry. Students will develop a working knowledge of Java, the most important new computer language to arise in the last decade. Students will also gain experience with the fundamental ideas of calculus and its application in science and engineering. The emphasis of the course is scientific programming, and not simply learning Java. The Java language is used as a tool in building mathematical models that are of interest to scientists and engineers.

Evaluation: Each student will receive a grade on the basis of the completion of the assigned programs, the completion and quality of a few writing assignments, the completion of an experimental design project (group activity), and the completion of a final modeling project that includes an online presentation (group project).

Online text: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Java Version - A computer science textbook by Allan DowneyBrian Turner
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Computational Science and Engineering Using Java Section DN
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Two years of algebra, one year of geometry, one year of a laboratory science; the class is designed as a first course in programming for science and engineering--the class is not intended for students who have completed an Advanced Placement course in computer science
Description: This course is an introduction to computational science, an interdisciplinary method of scientific inquiry. Students will develop a working knowledge of Java, the most important new computer language to arise in the last decade. Students will also gain experience with the fundamental ideas of calculus and its application in science and engineering. The emphasis of the course is scientific programming, and not simply learning Java. The Java language is used as a tool in building mathematical models that are of interest to scientists and engineers.

Evaluation: Each student will receive a grade on the basis of the completion of the assigned programs, the completion and quality of a few writing assignments, the completion of an experimental design project (group activity), and the completion of a final modeling project that includes an online presentation (group project).

Online text: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Java Version - A computer science textbook by Allan DowneyDaniel Nelson
Milford High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Computational Science and Engineering Using Java Section DR
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Two years of algebra, one year of geometry, one year of a laboratory science; the class is designed as a first course in programming for science and engineering--the class is not intended for students who have completed an Advanced Placement course in computer science
Description: This course is an introduction to computational science, an interdisciplinary method of scientific inquiry. Students will develop a working knowledge of Java, the most important new computer language to arise in the last decade. Students will also gain experience with the fundamental ideas of calculus and its application in science and engineering. The emphasis of the course is scientific programming, and not simply learning Java. The Java language is used as a tool in building mathematical models that are of interest to scientists and engineers.

Evaluation: Each student will receive a grade on the basis of the completion of the assigned programs, the completion and quality of a few writing assignments, the completion of an experimental design project (group activity), and the completion of a final modeling project that includes an online presentation (group project).

Online text: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Java Version - A computer science textbook by Allan DowneyDiane Rodriguez
Westborough High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Computer Science Honors Section BN: An Introduction
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: One year of Algebra.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Computational Science Using Java" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This course is an introduction to computer science, covering the basic concepts and elements of the Java programming language and introducing object-oriented programming. Students will gain experience writing programs that are well documented according to industry standards and will have the opportunity to create Java Applets and learn about Graphical User Interface programming with Swing. Additionally, the students will be encouraged to work both independently and collaboratively to solve practical problems that illustrate application-building techniques.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Beverly Newell
South Hadley High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Computer Science Honors Section BN: An Introduction
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: One year of Algebra.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Computational Science Using Java" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This course is an introduction to computer science, covering the basic concepts and elements of the Java programming language and introducing object-oriented programming. Students will gain experience writing programs that are well documented according to industry standards and will have the opportunity to create Java Applets and learn about Graphical User Interface programming with Swing. Additionally, the students will be encouraged to work both independently and collaboratively to solve practical problems that illustrate application-building techniques.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Beverly Newell
South Hadley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Computer Science Honors Section DB: An Introduction
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: One year of Algebra.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Computational Science Using Java" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This course is an introduction to computer science, covering the basic concepts and elements of the Java programming language and introducing object-oriented programming. Students will gain experience writing programs that are well documented according to industry standards and will have the opportunity to create Java Applets and learn about Graphical User Interface programming with Swing. Additionally, the students will be encouraged to work both independently and collaboratively to solve practical problems that illustrate application-building techniques.



*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Dennis Barham
Pathway to Technology Magnet School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Computer Science Honors Section DB: An Introduction
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: One year of Algebra.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Computational Science Using Java" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This course is an introduction to computer science, covering the basic concepts and elements of the Java programming language and introducing object-oriented programming. Students will gain experience writing programs that are well documented according to industry standards and will have the opportunity to create Java Applets and learn about Graphical User Interface programming with Swing. Additionally, the students will be encouraged to work both independently and collaboratively to solve practical problems that illustrate application-building techniques.



*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Dennis Barham
Pathway to Technology Magnet School


* - - - *

Course Title: Computer Science Honors Section KW: An Introduction
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: One year of Algebra.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Computational Science Using Java" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This course is an introduction to computer science, covering the basic concepts and elements of the Java programming language and introducing object-oriented programming. Students will gain experience writing programs that are well documented according to industry standards and will have the opportunity to create Java Applets and learn about Graphical User Interface programming with Swing. Additionally, the students will be encouraged to work both independently and collaboratively to solve practical problems that illustrate application-building techniques.



*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Karen Wood
Northland Christian School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Computer Science Honors Section KW: An Introduction
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: One year of Algebra.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Computational Science Using Java" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
This course is an introduction to computer science, covering the basic concepts and elements of the Java programming language and introducing object-oriented programming. Students will gain experience writing programs that are well documented according to industry standards and will have the opportunity to create Java Applets and learn about Graphical User Interface programming with Swing. Additionally, the students will be encouraged to work both independently and collaboratively to solve practical problems that illustrate application-building techniques.



*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Karen Wood
Northland Christian School


* - - - *

Course Title: Constitutional Law Section JA
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: U.S. History and American Government
Description: This Honors Level class explores the history and development of the United States Constitutional legal system. The primary focus will be on the basic principles of law, the judicial system and judicial/political behavior in U.S. history. Central themes of the course focus on the U.S. Supreme Court ‘s interpretation of law, power, and legal precedent. Students will read and listen to condensed versions of selected Supreme Court cases. Contemporary legal issues, including immigration law, and intellectual property law are also examined.

You do not need to be a lawyer to understand this class; you just need an interest in legal systems. This class promises to be enjoyable, with individual as well as group projects exploring the U.S. Constitution . See you in court!Jason Auclair
Chicopee High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Constitutional Law Section JG
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: U.S. History and American Government
Description: This class focuses on the history and development of the United States Constitutional Legal system.

The class starts by showing the student how the Supreme Court has gained its power and established its rules for decision-making. The class then examines how the Supreme Court has interpreted the United States Constitution and its amendments over the last 200 plus years. This encompasses studying the many individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights, including freedom of speech and religion, rights of the accused, affirmative action, the death penalty, and rights during wartime. In order to gain an understanding of these issues, students will read and listen to condensed versions of selected Supreme Court cases and hold discussions on these cases.

You do not need to be a lawyer to understand this class; you just need an interest in the law. This class promises to be enjoyable, with individual as well as group projects which explore the Supreme Court and its interpretation of the Constitution. Joseph Giarusso
Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Contemporary Irish Literature Section CR
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: What do you know about Ireland: green mountains by the sea, smiling faces, traditional music? Perhaps you have other images: St. Patrick’s Day, U2, the Ulster violence? Ireland is currently undergoing an artistic and literary revival. Irish rock groups and movies are justifiably popular in the United States. The high quality work of Ireland's living novelists, poets, essayists, and short story writers deserves to be equally well-known here. Contemporary Irish writers will serve as our guides in a search for the real Ireland. We will examine modern Irish themes such as: the rural west, the city, "The Troubles," gender, religion, and the prosperity of Modern Ireland. This course will be an enjoyable introduction to a startlingly creative people struggling to find a new voice.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Christopher Ruckdeschel
Minisink Valley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Contemporary Issues in American Law and Justice Section KS
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Strong reading, writing, critical thinking skills
Description: "Contemporary Issues in American Law and Justice" is a 21st Century focus on three major areas of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts and corrections. During the course and within these areas we will study current issues relating to crime/justice, punishment and victimization. Issues to discuss include the causes of crime and how we should and do deal with crime are addressed throughout the class. As well, students will participate in a state of the art online mock trial! Furthermore, course participants will study crime in their city/state/national region and become better acquainted with how their local community deals with crime. For students interested in law and justice-related fields this is a must. This course will serve as an introduction to terms and issues and the many facets of the American legal system. See you online!Kara Staunton-Shron
Monument Mountain Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Creating Art History Section LC
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None, but students must have access to scanner or digital camera. Students may be required to download (free) software from the Internet.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This is a "practical" course--you will learn Art History by both looking at art and creating art of your own! The virtual learning space is an artist's studio. This studio will be your workplace to share insights, collections, inspirations, and to critique each other's work in order to expand your own ideas.

This is a "thematic" approach to Art history --rather than chronological. Ideas within the themes of self-portrait, conflict, simplicity, storytelling, and the natural world will be explored. You will collect and create art that communicates your own ideas of each theme. After traveling to online art museums and artists' studios and creating a drawing, painting, ink wash and a handmade book, you will design your own exhibit!

This is a combination of traditional and modern methods! Traditional (drawing, painting) and modern (image manipulation) media will be your tools. You will sketch, paint, draw, and collage into pages of a sketchbook. These pages will be scanned or photographed with a digital camera and displayed on the monitors of your classmates' computer screens! Technology will transform your art, ideas, comments, critiques, sketches, and collections into an interactive and collaborative Art History.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Lotte Calnek
Danvers High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Creating Effective PowerPoint Presentations Section DM Private Offering
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Students must have access to PowerPoint in order to complete this class. Software will not be mailed out to students. Students should also have the ability to download and upload files. This should be acceptable to your school.

Knowledge of Window's interface and familiarity with its terminology.

Students with Macintosh computers should also be comfortable with this course but support is not available for this interface.
Some basic knowledge of PowerPoint software, digital cameras, CD-ROM drives, scanners and searching the Internet is desirable.
Description: **This is a private offering for Cincinnati Prep students**

Explore technology and multimedia! This course offers you the opportunity to conduct an extensive inquiry and research into subject matter needed to produce a multimedia presentation/project utilizing the full range of available multimedia functions (sound, video, computer graphics, animation, and text).

You will create a multimedia project by using Microsoft's PowerPoint. PowerPoint is not provided because most schools already have this program. You will work with tools such as scanners, CD-ROM drives, sound input devices, digital cameras, video cameras, and other tools available at your school. Whether you have limited resources or many, it is possible to begin authoring a multimedia project.

Your presentation will be built around a certain subject. The subjects are: The Astronomer -- explore the solar system; The Pacifist – discover the people who made the world more peaceful; The Engineer – learn about America’s structural achievements; The Ecologist – investigate ecosystems and the destructive effects of pollution; The Historian –- examine the historical accomplishments of American Presidents; The Travel Agent – take an exciting travel expedition through Europe. You will research the Internet and other sources to obtain your information for your presentation.

Multimedia is an exciting technology that is widely used today in business and education. Why not take the challenge and learn how to prepare a presentation to better deliver your message or idea?Dorothy Maxwell
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Creating Effective PowerPoint Presentations Section PV
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students must have access to PowerPoint in order to complete this class. Software will not be mailed out to students. Students should also have the ability to download and upload files. This should be acceptable to your school.

Knowledge of Window's interface and familiarity with its terminology.

Students with Macintosh computers should also be comfortable with this course but support is not available for this interface.
Some basic knowledge of PowerPoint software, digital cameras, CD-ROM drives, scanners and searching the Internet is desirable.
Description: Explore technology and multimedia! This course offers you the opportunity to conduct an extensive inquiry and research into subject matter needed to produce a multimedia presentation/project utilizing the full range of available multimedia functions (sound, video, computer graphics, animation, and text).

You will create a multimedia project by using Microsoft's PowerPoint. PowerPoint is not provided because most schools already have this program. You will work with tools such as scanners, CD-ROM drives, sound input devices, digital cameras, video cameras, and other tools available at your school. Whether you have limited resources or many, it is possible to begin authoring a multimedia project.

Your presentation will be built around a certain subject. The subjects are: The Astronomer -- explore the solar system; The Pacifist – discover the people who made the world more peaceful; The Engineer – learn about America’s structural achievements; The Ecologist – investigate ecosystems and the destructive effects of pollution; The Historian –- examine the historical accomplishments of American Presidents; The Travel Agent – take an exciting travel expedition through Europe. You will research the Internet and other sources to obtain your information for your presentation.

Multimedia is an exciting technology that is widely used today in business and education. Why not take the challenge and learn how to prepare a presentation to better deliver your message or idea?Patricia Vivari
Lincoln High School


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Course Title: Creative Writing Section HS
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Comfort and proficiency with the English language. Experience writing poems and stories.
Description: The semester will begin with thought, reading, on-line discussion and writing about WHY people write, why bother to do imaginative writing when we can just turn on our TVs or access the Internet. Along the way, we'll try to decide: What is the fundamental impulse behind poems and stories? How are they constructed, and what techniques do particular writers use effectively? What kinds of work do we most admire and why? How can a poem or a piece of fiction speak to us across, years, genders, and cultures?Heather Stem
Hackettstown High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Creative Writing Section JC
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Comfort and proficiency with the English language. Experience writing poems and stories.
Description: The semester will begin with thought, reading, on-line discussion and writing about WHY people write, why bother to do imaginative writing when we can just turn on our TVs or access the Internet. Along the way, we'll try to decide: What is the fundamental impulse behind poems and stories? How are they constructed, and what techniques do particular writers use effectively? What kinds of work do we most admire and why? How can a poem or a piece of fiction speak to us across, years, genders, and cultures?John Coon
Colchester High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Creative Writing Section KD
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Comfort and proficiency with the English language. Experience writing poems and stories.
Description: The semester will begin with thought, reading, on-line discussion and writing about WHY people write, why bother to do imaginative writing when we can just turn on our TVs or access the Internet. Along the way, we'll try to decide: What is the fundamental impulse behind poems and stories? How are they constructed, and what techniques do particular writers use effectively? What kinds of work do we most admire and why? How can a poem or a piece of fiction speak to us across, years, genders, and cultures?Kelley Donovan
Fitch High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Creative Writing Section RD
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Comfort and proficiency with the English language. Experience writing poems and stories.
Description: The semester will begin with thought, reading, on-line discussion and writing about WHY people write, why bother to do imaginative writing when we can just turn on our TVs or access the Internet. Along the way, we'll try to decide: What is the fundamental impulse behind poems and stories? How are they constructed, and what techniques do particular writers use effectively? What kinds of work do we most admire and why? How can a poem or a piece of fiction speak to us across, years, genders, and cultures?Rebekka Doolittle
Tri-Valley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Creative Writing Section RK
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Comfort and proficiency with the English language. Experience writing poems and stories.
Description: The semester will begin with thought, reading, on-line discussion and writing about WHY people write, why bother to do imaginative writing when we can just turn on our TVs or access the Internet. Along the way, we'll try to decide: What is the fundamental impulse behind poems and stories? How are they constructed, and what techniques do particular writers use effectively? What kinds of work do we most admire and why? How can a poem or a piece of fiction speak to us across, years, genders, and cultures?Rosann Kozlowski
Frederick W. Hartnett Middle School


* - - - *

Course Title: Credit Recovery Algebra I
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: This course covers a full year of Algebra I concepts for credit recovery.

This course will cover all of the basic topics of an Algebra 1 course including: solving equations, slope, systems of equations (solved mathematically and graphically), exponents, monomials and polynomials. Students are asked to view videos, tutorials and animations, play math games, complete simulations and write in their journals. Most topics have automated quizzes that students can take up to 3 times to achieve their best score. Students will also complete unit quizzes to test their knowledge of the content and reflect on their performance. Students will also work on various projects and will participate in class discussions about math topics.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the local school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Susan Robinson
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Credit Recovery Biology
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: This semester long credit recovery course begins with Cell Biology and then covers Molecular Biology and Genetics, Evolution and Diversity of Life and Ecology. Students are asked to view videos, tutorials and animations, play biology games and complete simulations. Most assignments have follow-up activities that include 3-2-1 key fact assignments, automated quizzes, vocabulary word walls, and concept maps. At the end of each week, students complete a weekly quiz to test their knowledge of the content and are asked to reflect on their performance. At the end of each unit, students reflect on the content of the unit in a class discussion and complete a unit test.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the local school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Christine Colella
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Credit Recovery English 10 Section NC
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Never been enrolled in an online course or want to take another one?

Have you always wanted to improve your skills in reading, writing, and grammar?

Do you feel that you would like to participate in an online course that allows you to work daily in an environment that allows you to spend more time in those areas that have been obstacles to achieving academic success?

Do you need to make up credit in 10th grade English so that you can move into the next English course with your peers?

Are you interested in exploring a new and exciting way to attend a class that introduces you to other students from high schools across the United States?

If you answered yes to some or all of these questions, then this is the course for you. This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and one novel. You will increase your language skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes and by polishing up on your grammar skills. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to join other high school students in course discussions and activities. Also, you can discuss your thoughts and interests with classmates in a special place in the course that is devoted to nonacademic topics.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the local school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Nora Clooney
Nashoba Valley Technical High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Credit Recovery English 11
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Never been enrolled in an online course or want to take another one?

Have you always wanted to improve your skills in reading, writing, and grammar?

Do you feel that you would like to participate in an online course that allows you to work daily in an environment that allows you to spend more time in those areas that have been obstacles to achieving academic success?

Do you need to make up credit in 11th grade English so that you can move into the next English course with your peers?

Are you interested in exploring a new and exciting way to attend a class that introduces you to other students from high schools across the United States?

If you answered yes to some or all of these questions, then this is the course for you. This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will concentrate on American Literature from the Colonial to the Post Modern periods and will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and one self-selected novel. You will increase your language skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes and by polishing up on your grammar skills. Vocabulary study will include words from the SAT most frequently used word lists. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication. We will be doing a course-long timeline project on American culture using 21st century tools.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to join other high school students in course discussions and activities. Also, you can discuss your thoughts and interests with classmates in a special place in the course that is devoted to nonacademic topics.


There is no media kit. All materials are online. There is a self-selected novel that students will find locally at their school or public library. Possible titles may include:
1. The Crucible
2. The Scarlet Letter
3. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Twain)
4. The Scarlet Letter (Hawthorne)
5. Black Boy (Wright)
6. Last of the Mohicans (Cooper)
7. Ethan Frome (Wharton)
8. To Kill a Mockingbird (Lee)
9. My Antonia
10. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
11. Beloved by Toni Morrison
12. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
13. A Farewell to Arms(Hemingway)
14. Native Son (Wright)
15. The Grapes of Wrath
16. Joy Luck Club (Tan)
17. Color Purple (Morrison)
18. House on Mango Street (Cisneros)

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the local school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Linda McHugh
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Credit Recovery English 11 Section NC
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Never been enrolled in an online course or want to take another one?

Have you always wanted to improve your skills in reading, writing, and grammar?

Do you feel that you would like to participate in an online course that allows you to work daily in an environment that allows you to spend more time in those areas that have been obstacles to achieving academic success?

Do you need to make up credit in 11th grade English so that you can move into the next English course with your peers?

Are you interested in exploring a new and exciting way to attend a class that introduces you to other students from high schools across the United States?

If you answered yes to some or all of these questions, then this is the course for you. This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will concentrate on American Literature from the Colonial to the Post Modern periods and will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and one self-selected novel. You will increase your language skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes and by polishing up on your grammar skills. Vocabulary study will include words from the SAT most frequently used word lists. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication. We will be doing a course-long timeline project on American culture using 21st century tools.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to join other high school students in course discussions and activities. Also, you can discuss your thoughts and interests with classmates in a special place in the course that is devoted to nonacademic topics.


There is no media kit. All materials are online. There is a self-selected novel that students will find locally at their school or public library. Possible titles may include:
1. The Crucible
2. The Scarlet Letter
3. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Twain)
4. The Scarlet Letter (Hawthorne)
5. Black Boy (Wright)
6. Last of the Mohicans (Cooper)
7. Ethan Frome (Wharton)
8. To Kill a Mockingbird (Lee)
9. My Antonia
10. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
11. Beloved by Toni Morrison
12. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
13. A Farewell to Arms(Hemingway)
14. Native Son (Wright)
15. The Grapes of Wrath
16. Joy Luck Club (Tan)
17. Color Purple (Morrison)
18. House on Mango Street (Cisneros)

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the local school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Nora Clooney
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Credit Recovery English 9
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you always wanted to improve your skills in reading, writing, and grammar? Do you feel that you would like to participate in an online course that allows you to work daily in an environment that allows you to spend more time in those areas that have been obstacles to achieving academic success?

Do you need to make up credit in 9th grade English so that you can move into the next English course with the rest of your peers?

Are you interested in exploring a new and exciting way to attend a class that introduces you to other students from high schools across the United States?

If you answered yes to some or all of these questions, then this is the course for you. This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and one novel. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to join other high school students in course discussions and activities. Also, you can discuss your thoughts and interests with classmates in a special place in the course that is devoted to nonacademic topics.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the local school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Nora Clooney
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Credit Recovery Geometry
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites:
Description: The course emphasizes the relationships among geometric figures and concepts and applies them to real world applications.
The concepts of points, lines, planes, parallel lines, congruence, similarity, polygons, coordinate geometry, area, volume, circles, and right triangle trigonometry will be explored. Students will apply logical thinking throughout the course, without an emphasis on formal proofs. Students are expected to have, and be able to use, solid algebra skills to solve problems in each topic area. Internet resources are used throughout the course to explore and instruct the topics presented.

Media:
There is no text for this course. All instruction materials are either provided in the course or located on content related websites. Geogebra, a free geometry software application, will be downloaded and used for constructions and investigations.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the local school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Kara Gansman
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Credit Recovery Geometry Section SR
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: The course emphasizes the relationships among geometric figures and concepts and applies them to real world applications.
The concepts of points, lines, planes, parallel lines, congruence, similarity, polygons, coordinate geometry, area, volume, circles, and right triangle trigonometry will be explored. Students will apply logical thinking throughout the course, without an emphasis on formal proofs. Students are expected to have, and be able to use, solid algebra skills to solve problems in each topic area. Internet resources are used throughout the course to explore and instruct the topics presented.

Media:
There is no text for this course. All instruction materials are either provided in the course or located on content related websites. Geogebra, a free geometry software application, will be downloaded and used for constructions and investigations.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the local school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Susan Robinson
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section CB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? The course entitled Criminology will explore the reasons why people commit crimes. To better understand these reasons, we must first examine why laws were created and how they evolved over time in response to society’s needs. There are three main types of crime and the reasons why people commit each individual type are as different as the types of crimes themselves. We will also look at the prevalence of crime by examining research conducted on crime trends. The main focus of the course will be the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable criminals. While the course will focus on all types of crime, including homicide and domestic violence, the connection between drugs and crime will also be explored. In addition we will discuss the indicators of dangerousness in predicting criminal behavior, as well as the competency standards for involvement in the legal process. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. If we understand why people commit crimes, then what can be done to prevent crime and how should we deal with criminals once they have committed an offense? Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset. Catherine Buebendorf
RHAM High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section CS
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? Criminology will explore the reasons why people commit crimes.

First we’ll examine why laws were created and how they evolve over time in response to society’s needs. Then, we’ll focus on the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior, including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable and notorious criminals. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Some of the issues we’ll discuss are:
3 main types of crime
Prevalence of crime
Connection between drugs and crime
Indicators of dangerousness
Predicting criminal behavior
Competency standards

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset.Christopher Savio
Glen Ridge High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section CS2
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? Criminology will explore the reasons why people commit crimes.

First we’ll examine why laws were created and how they evolve over time in response to society’s needs. Then, we’ll focus on the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior, including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable and notorious criminals. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Some of the issues we’ll discuss are:
3 main types of crime
Prevalence of crime
Connection between drugs and crime
Indicators of dangerousness
Predicting criminal behavior
Competency standards

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset.Christopher Savio
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section CW
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? The course entitled Criminology will explore the reasons why people commit crimes. To better understand these reasons, we must first examine why laws were created and how they evolved over time in response to society’s needs. There are three main types of crime and the reasons why people commit each individual type are as different as the types of crimes themselves. We will also look at the prevalence of crime by examining research conducted on crime trends. The main focus of the course will be the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable criminals. While the course will focus on all types of crime, including homicide and domestic violence, the connection between drugs and crime will also be explored. In addition we will discuss the indicators of dangerousness in predicting criminal behavior, as well as the competency standards for involvement in the legal process. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. If we understand why people commit crimes, then what can be done to prevent crime and how should we deal with criminals once they have committed an offense? Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset. Christine Wozny
Newburyport High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section DD
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? Criminology will explore the reasons why people commit crimes.

First we’ll examine why laws were created and how they evolve over time in response to society’s needs. Then, we’ll focus on the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior, including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable and notorious criminals. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Some of the issues we’ll discuss are:
3 main types of crime
Prevalence of crime
Connection between drugs and crime
Indicators of dangerousness
Predicting criminal behavior
Competency standards

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset.Debra Desnoyers
Green Island Union Free School District


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section DD2
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? Criminology will explore the reasons why people commit crimes.

First we’ll examine why laws were created and how they evolve over time in response to society’s needs. Then, we’ll focus on the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior, including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable and notorious criminals. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Some of the issues we’ll discuss are:
3 main types of crime
Prevalence of crime
Connection between drugs and crime
Indicators of dangerousness
Predicting criminal behavior
Competency standards

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset.Debra Desnoyers
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section JDH
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? The course entitled Criminology will explore the reasons why people commit crimes. To better understand these reasons, we must first examine why laws were created and how they evolved over time in response to society’s needs. There are three main types of crime and the reasons why people commit each individual type are as different as the types of crimes themselves. We will also look at the prevalence of crime by examining research conducted on crime trends. The main focus of the course will be the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable criminals. While the course will focus on all types of crime, including homicide and domestic violence, the connection between drugs and crime will also be explored. In addition we will discuss the indicators of dangerousness in predicting criminal behavior, as well as the competency standards for involvement in the legal process. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. If we understand why people commit crimes, then what can be done to prevent crime and how should we deal with criminals once they have committed an offense? Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset. Jon Dugan-Henriksen
White Mountains Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section MD
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? The course entitled Criminology will explore the reasons why people commit crimes. To better understand these reasons, we must first examine why laws were created and how they evolved over time in response to society’s needs. There are three main types of crime and the reasons why people commit each individual type are as different as the types of crimes themselves. We will also look at the prevalence of crime by examining research conducted on crime trends. The main focus of the course will be the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable criminals. While the course will focus on all types of crime, including homicide and domestic violence, the connection between drugs and crime will also be explored. In addition we will discuss the indicators of dangerousness in predicting criminal behavior, as well as the competency standards for involvement in the legal process. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. If we understand why people commit crimes, then what can be done to prevent crime and how should we deal with criminals once they have committed an offense? Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset. Michael Dring
Wilton-Lyndeborough Cooperative


* - - - *

Course Title: Criminology Section ML
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Have you ever been fascinated by a crime story and wondered: How could somebody commit such an unspeakable act or how could someone who seemingly has everything throw it all away doing something illegal? Does a person’s environment increase the likelihood of becoming a criminal or is criminality an inherited trait? The course, Criminology, will explore the reasons why people commit crimes. To better understand these reasons, we must first examine why laws were created and how they have evolved over time in response to society’s needs. There are three main types of crime and the reasons why people commit each individual type are as different as the types of crimes themselves. We will also look at the prevalence of crime by examining research conducted on crime trends. The main focus of the course will be the theoretical perspectives of criminal behavior, including biological, psychological and sociological theories. We will delve into the minds of serial killers, thieves, drug dealers, and even corporate criminals as we examine notable criminals. While the course will focus on all types of crime, including homicide and domestic violence crimes, the connection between drugs and crime will also be explored. We will discuss the indicators of dangerousness in predicting criminal behavior, as well as the competency standards for involvement in the legal process. Finally, we will explore the treatment of criminals by the correctional system. If we understand why people commit crimes, then we can move closer to determining what can be done to prevent crime and how we should deal with criminals once they have committed an offense. Ultimately, you will be asked to design a policy statement for crime prevention and treatment programs for criminals based on the theoretical assumptions that you support.

Disclaimer: Given the contents of the course, some of the subject matter is violent and gruesome in nature. This may not be the course for you if your sensibilities are easily upset. Michael Langway
Tri-Valley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Democracy in the U.S.
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: American Government
Description: "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be."
-Thomas Jefferson

Why is voter turnout so low? Are the two parties representing accurately the values and beliefs of the majority of Americans? Is our current campaign finance system just legalized bribery? Is the media doing its job of fairly and objectively informing the public about the workings of our government? How are corporate mergers and the global economy effecting the United States? What effects are the "War on Drugs," the "War on Terrorism" and government secrecy having on our rights, guaranteed by the Constitution?

In this class we will use The Bill of Rights as a starting point to explore these topics and others. You will examine and understand these issues. Throughout the semester you will also be forced to take a position on various issues, support it, and then search for solutions to the problems you uncover.

There will be a final project where each student will choose a public policy topic that interests them, investigate it, reach a conclusion, and be able to support it in a paper showing both sides of the issue.

You will read a chapter or so a week in each of two books we'll be using; In Our Defense by Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg (JFK's daughter) and Ellen Alderman, and Lost Rights by James Bovard. Both books are current and interesting. There will be some questions to answer with each reading. You will also be exploring various newspaper, magazine and public policy websites as well as writing short essays about what you find there. Lastly, you will be expected to participate fully in our discussions about the readings and how they relate to current events.

There will be no media kits sent out. All materials will be posted online. If you prefer to have hard copy of the materials you can either print them or purchase them from your local bookstore. The books used in the course are:

The Bill of Rights in Modern American by David Bodenhamer (ISBN- 978-0-253-21991-6)

In Our Defense by Ellen Alderman and Caroline Kennedy (ISBN- 0-380-71720-4)

Grades:

-- 70% Readings and Homework
-- 30% Essays and Discussions
-- 13% of course grade: Final Project

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*John Adkins
Anna High School


* - - - *

Course Title: DNA Technology
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: DNA Technology will provide an in-depth focus on the field that has developed recently as a result of discoveries based on knowledge of DNA. This should provide students with a better understanding of information they are facing on a daily basis concerning DNA. They will also take a close look at a new and exciting industry, the biotechnology industry as a career potential.

Students will trace the timeline of the history of genetics up through the discovery of the structure of the DNA molecule. Students will study the basic DNA molecule, make a DNA model and model protein synthesis using such Internet resources as Access Excellence, Biology Hypertextbook, Biology Project and Biology.com. Simple kitchen labs will be performed for the extraction of DNA using common detergent and salt. Technology based on DNA will be addressed including restriction enzymes, DNA fingerprinting, Recombinant DNA and PCR. The class will then examine various applications of the Biotechnology industry such as agriculture, medicine, genetic, and forensics. We will be involved in WebQuests concerning cloning and genetically engineered foods and will propose legislation on these controversial topics. Finally ethical issues and scientific concerns will be debated on-line.Karen Culberson
Nipmuc Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Eastern and Western Thought Section AC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: Students will examine great thinkers of the East and the West, from ancient to modern times. Students will read selections from works such as the Bhagavad Gita and the I Ching as well as read excerpts by philosophers such as Buddha, Lao-Tse, Muhammed, Gandhi, Socrates, Locke, Rousseau, deBeauvoir, and Marx. All reading will be "on-line." Students will also use the Internet for discussion and course work, including research and other activities. A key theme of the course will be to examine the similarities and differences between Eastern and Western thinkers. Students will conclude the course with individual research and preparation of a project about a "thinker" of their choice.Adrian Castelli
Zurich International School


* - - - *

Course Title: Eastern and Western Thought Section KB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: Students will examine great thinkers of the East and the West, from ancient to modern times. Students will read selections from works such as the Bhagavad Gita and the I Ching as well as read excerpts by philosophers such as Buddha, Lao-Tse, Muhammed, Gandhi, Socrates, Locke, Rousseau, deBeauvoir, and Marx. All reading will be "on-line." Students will also use the Internet for discussion and course work, including research and other activities. A key theme of the course will be to examine the similarities and differences between Eastern and Western thinkers. Students will conclude the course with individual research and preparation of a project about a "thinker" of their choice.Kristin Buckmaster
Sun Valley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Economics Honors Section AZ: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Solid reading and writing skills, history and American government would be helpful, basic math skills such as working with decimals and fractions
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Economics is the study of how individuals, groups, and countries deal with the problem of limited resources and unlimited wants and needs. This course helps students gain a deeper understanding of important concepts such as tradeoffs, opportunity cost, supply and demand, saving and investing, production and consumption, fiscal and monetary policy, inflation and unemployment, and trade policy. Upon successful completion of the course students should be better able to assess the economic policy decisions that affect them, their community and their country. Previous mastery of basic math skills is essential.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Annmarie Zaborski
Narragansett High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Economics Honors Section AZ: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Solid reading and writing skills, history and American government would be helpful, basic math skills such as working with decimals and fractions
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Economics is the study of how individuals, groups, and countries deal with the problem of limited resources and unlimited wants and needs. This course helps students gain a deeper understanding of important concepts such as tradeoffs, opportunity cost, supply and demand, saving and investing, production and consumption, fiscal and monetary policy, inflation and unemployment, and trade policy. Upon successful completion of the course students should be better able to assess the economic policy decisions that affect them, their community and their country. Previous mastery of basic math skills is essential.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Annmarie Zaborski
Narragansett High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Economics Honors Section DA: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Solid reading and writing skills, history and American government would be helpful, basic math skills such as working with decimals and fractions
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Economics is the study of how individuals, groups, and countries deal with the problem of limited resources and unlimited wants and needs. This course helps students gain a deeper understanding of important concepts such as tradeoffs, opportunity cost, supply and demand, saving and investing, production and consumption, fiscal and monetary policy, inflation and unemployment, and trade policy. Upon successful completion of the course students should be better able to assess the economic policy decisions that affect them, their community and their country. Previous mastery of basic math skills is essential.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Diane Atwood
Freeport High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Economics Honors Section DA: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Solid reading and writing skills, history and American government would be helpful, basic math skills such as working with decimals and fractions
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Economics is the study of how individuals, groups, and countries deal with the problem of limited resources and unlimited wants and needs. This course helps students gain a deeper understanding of important concepts such as tradeoffs, opportunity cost, supply and demand, saving and investing, production and consumption, fiscal and monetary policy, inflation and unemployment, and trade policy. Upon successful completion of the course students should be better able to assess the economic policy decisions that affect them, their community and their country. Previous mastery of basic math skills is essential.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Diane Atwood
Freeport High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Employability Skills for the 21st Century Section JD
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic word processing/keyboarding
Description: Possessing top-notch job-searching skills is highly essential in today’s global work environment. This course teaches you fundamental job-seeking skills including how to develop an effective resume, complete a job application, and prepare for an interview. You will also learn how to thrive and survive in today’s highly competitive global marketplace.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*JeanAnn DePietropaolo
Perkiomen Valley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Employability Skills for the 21st Century Section JG
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic word processing/keyboarding
Description: Possessing top-notch job-searching skills is highly essential in today’s global work environment. This course teaches you fundamental job-seeking skills including how to develop an effective resume, complete a job application, and prepare for an interview. You will also learn how to thrive and survive in today’s highly competitive global marketplace.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*John Ganss
Cape Cod Regional Technical High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Engineering for Sustainable Energy Section JR
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: • Level 1 Physics and Algebra are desirable, but not essential. Relevant lessons in the class are differentiated to accommodate different skill levels in math and physical science.
• Access to basic hand tools, scrap materials and a place to fabricate models.
• Access to a digital camera for posting pictures of work.
• Basic familiarity with using spreadsheets to manipulate, chart, and analyze data.
Description: The class begins and ends with the following problem: “Global energy use is projected to increase hugely over the next few years, and will continue to have major impacts on the environment and the economy around the world. How can science and engineering be harnessed to better manage energy use in our society?”
The class will look at this problem using a variety of skills and concepts from the worlds of engineering, math and science. We will explore concepts of sustainability, thermodynamics, design, statistics, public opinion, and much more on this journey to better understand the nature of the problem, and how to go about solving it.
Each week, students will explore a selection of these topics through a mixture of activities, such as discussions, research projects, and model making. One major project involves collaboration with other students on a significant design project to address the core problem. Each group will exhibit their design solution as a wiki for the rest of the class (and others perhaps?) to see.
Participants should be high school students with an interest in engineering and science, especially in the field of sustainable energy practices. Whether you have highly developed skills in these areas, or are just beginning, the class can work for you. Advanced or novice in science and/or engineering, the class provides the opportunity to use these skills to explore how to achieve the goal of sustainable energy engineering.
One class can achieve little more than to scratch the surface of such a vast topic. However, by bringing together skills and knowledge from a number of disciplines, our hope is that you will find this a stimulating introduction to this significant field of study and practice.John Rozen
Whitman-Hanson Regional High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Engineering for Sustainable Energy Section JR
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: • Level 1 Physics and Algebra are desirable, but not essential. Relevant lessons in the class are differentiated to accommodate different skill levels in math and physical science.
• Access to basic hand tools, scrap materials and a place to fabricate models.
• Access to a digital camera for posting pictures of work.
• Basic familiarity with using spreadsheets to manipulate, chart, and analyze data.
Description: The class begins and ends with the following problem: “Global energy use is projected to increase hugely over the next few years, and will continue to have major impacts on the environment and the economy around the world. How can science and engineering be harnessed to better manage energy use in our society?”
The class will look at this problem using a variety of skills and concepts from the worlds of engineering, math and science. We will explore concepts of sustainability, thermodynamics, design, statistics, public opinion, and much more on this journey to better understand the nature of the problem, and how to go about solving it.
Each week, students will explore a selection of these topics through a mixture of activities, such as discussions, research projects, and model making. One major project involves collaboration with other students on a significant design project to address the core problem. Each group will exhibit their design solution as a wiki for the rest of the class (and others perhaps?) to see.
Participants should be high school students with an interest in engineering and science, especially in the field of sustainable energy practices. Whether you have highly developed skills in these areas, or are just beginning, the class can work for you. Advanced or novice in science and/or engineering, the class provides the opportunity to use these skills to explore how to achieve the goal of sustainable energy engineering.
One class can achieve little more than to scratch the surface of such a vast topic. However, by bringing together skills and knowledge from a number of disciplines, our hope is that you will find this a stimulating introduction to this significant field of study and practice.John Rozen
Whitman-Hanson Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Engineering for Sustainable Energy Section TS
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: • Level 1 Physics and Algebra are desirable, but not essential. Relevant lessons in the class are differentiated to accommodate different skill levels in math and physical science.
• Access to basic hand tools, scrap materials and a place to fabricate models.
• Access to a digital camera for posting pictures of work.
• Basic familiarity with using spreadsheets to manipulate, chart, and analyze data.
Description: The class begins and ends with the following problem: “Global energy use is projected to increase hugely over the next few years, and will continue to have major impacts on the environment and the economy around the world. How can science and engineering be harnessed to better manage energy use in our society?”
The class will look at this problem using a variety of skills and concepts from the worlds of engineering, math and science. We will explore concepts of sustainability, thermodynamics, design, statistics, public opinion, and much more on this journey to better understand the nature of the problem, and how to go about solving it.
Each week, students will explore a selection of these topics through a mixture of activities, such as discussions, research projects, and model making. One major project involves collaboration with other students on a significant design project to address the core problem. Each group will exhibit their design solution as a wiki for the rest of the class (and others perhaps?) to see.
Participants should be high school students with an interest in engineering and science, especially in the field of sustainable energy practices. Whether you have highly developed skills in these areas, or are just beginning, the class can work for you. Advanced or novice in science and/or engineering, the class provides the opportunity to use these skills to explore how to achieve the goal of sustainable energy engineering.
One class can achieve little more than to scratch the surface of such a vast topic. However, by bringing together skills and knowledge from a number of disciplines, our hope is that you will find this a stimulating introduction to this significant field of study and practice. Thomas Sager
John Handley High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Engineering for Sustainable Energy Section TS
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: • Level 1 Physics and Algebra are desirable, but not essential. Relevant lessons in the class are differentiated to accommodate different skill levels in math and physical science.
• Access to basic hand tools, scrap materials and a place to fabricate models.
• Access to a digital camera for posting pictures of work.
• Basic familiarity with using spreadsheets to manipulate, chart, and analyze data.
Description: The class begins and ends with the following problem: “Global energy use is projected to increase hugely over the next few years, and will continue to have major impacts on the environment and the economy around the world. How can science and engineering be harnessed to better manage energy use in our society?”
The class will look at this problem using a variety of skills and concepts from the worlds of engineering, math and science. We will explore concepts of sustainability, thermodynamics, design, statistics, public opinion, and much more on this journey to better understand the nature of the problem, and how to go about solving it.
Each week, students will explore a selection of these topics through a mixture of activities, such as discussions, research projects, and model making. One major project involves collaboration with other students on a significant design project to address the core problem. Each group will exhibit their design solution as a wiki for the rest of the class (and others perhaps?) to see.
Participants should be high school students with an interest in engineering and science, especially in the field of sustainable energy practices. Whether you have highly developed skills in these areas, or are just beginning, the class can work for you. Advanced or novice in science and/or engineering, the class provides the opportunity to use these skills to explore how to achieve the goal of sustainable energy engineering.
One class can achieve little more than to scratch the surface of such a vast topic. However, by bringing together skills and knowledge from a number of disciplines, our hope is that you will find this a stimulating introduction to this significant field of study and practice. Thomas Sager
John Handley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Engineering Principles Section DH
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra skills (formula solving, substitution, and evaluation,) basic geometry knowledge (shapes, areas, visualization of cross-sections)
Description: Question: Why don’t buildings and bridges fall down more often?
Answer: Because there are people who have the skills to put together the right materials in the right shape to make them stay up –sometimes even during large earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes.
Have you ever looked at impressive structures like large bridges, skyscrapers, or even private homes, and wondered why they don’t fall down more often? Perhaps you are the kind of person who never gives a second thought to such matters – assuming that structures are all pretty safe. But even a quick look at the history of buildings will show you that they don’t always work. What made the Tacoma Narrows Bridge fall apart in a tame wind in 1940? Why do buildings in Los Angeles survive large earthquakes, while others in other parts of the world (such as in Bam, Iran, 2003) are flattened? This course will introduce students to the engineering world that helps to understand these questions, and to lead some people into the professions related to structural engineering.

Douglas Horne
Essex High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Engineering Principles Section DH
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra skills (formula solving, substitution, and evaluation,) basic geometry knowledge (shapes, areas, visualization of cross-sections)
Description: Question: Why don’t buildings and bridges fall down more often?
Answer: Because there are people who have the skills to put together the right materials in the right shape to make them stay up –sometimes even during large earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes.
Have you ever looked at impressive structures like large bridges, skyscrapers, or even private homes, and wondered why they don’t fall down more often? Perhaps you are the kind of person who never gives a second thought to such matters – assuming that structures are all pretty safe. But even a quick look at the history of buildings will show you that they don’t always work. What made the Tacoma Narrows Bridge fall apart in a tame wind in 1940? Why do buildings in Los Angeles survive large earthquakes, while others in other parts of the world (such as in Bam, Iran, 2003) are flattened? This course will introduce students to the engineering world that helps to understand these questions, and to lead some people into the professions related to structural engineering.

Douglas Horne
Essex High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Engineering Principles Section MJ
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra skills (formula solving, substitution, and evaluation,) basic geometry knowledge (shapes, areas, visualization of cross-sections)
Description: Question: Why don’t buildings and bridges fall down more often?
Answer: Because there are people who have the skills to put together the right materials in the right shape to make them stay up –sometimes even during large earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes.
Have you ever looked at impressive structures like large bridges, skyscrapers, or even private homes, and wondered why they don’t fall down more often? Perhaps you are the kind of person who never gives a second thought to such matters – assuming that structures are all pretty safe. But even a quick look at the history of buildings will show you that they don’t always work. What made the Tacoma Narrows Bridge fall apart in a tame wind in 1940? Why do buildings in Los Angeles survive large earthquakes, while others in other parts of the world (such as in Bam, Iran, 2003) are flattened? This course will introduce students to the engineering world that helps to understand these questions, and to lead some people into the professions related to structural engineering.

Margaret Jones
WSWHE BOCES


* - - - *,
Course Title: Engineering Principles Section MJ
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra skills (formula solving, substitution, and evaluation,) basic geometry knowledge (shapes, areas, visualization of cross-sections)
Description: Question: Why don’t buildings and bridges fall down more often?
Answer: Because there are people who have the skills to put together the right materials in the right shape to make them stay up –sometimes even during large earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes.
Have you ever looked at impressive structures like large bridges, skyscrapers, or even private homes, and wondered why they don’t fall down more often? Perhaps you are the kind of person who never gives a second thought to such matters – assuming that structures are all pretty safe. But even a quick look at the history of buildings will show you that they don’t always work. What made the Tacoma Narrows Bridge fall apart in a tame wind in 1940? Why do buildings in Los Angeles survive large earthquakes, while others in other parts of the world (such as in Bam, Iran, 2003) are flattened? This course will introduce students to the engineering world that helps to understand these questions, and to lead some people into the professions related to structural engineering.

Margaret Jones
WSWHE BOCES


* - - - *

Course Title: Engineering Principles Section RR
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra skills (formula solving, substitution, and evaluation,) basic geometry knowledge (shapes, areas, visualization of cross-sections)
Description: Question: Why don’t buildings and bridges fall down more often?
Answer: Because there are people who have the skills to put together the right materials in the right shape to make them stay up –sometimes even during large earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes.
Have you ever looked at impressive structures like large bridges, skyscrapers, or even private homes, and wondered why they don’t fall down more often? Perhaps you are the kind of person who never gives a second thought to such matters – assuming that structures are all pretty safe. But even a quick look at the history of buildings will show you that they don’t always work. What made the Tacoma Narrows Bridge fall apart in a tame wind in 1940? Why do buildings in Los Angeles survive large earthquakes, while others in other parts of the world (such as in Bam, Iran, 2003) are flattened? This course will introduce students to the engineering world that helps to understand these questions, and to lead some people into the professions related to structural engineering.

Robert Reilly
Palisades High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Engineering Principles Section RR
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra skills (formula solving, substitution, and evaluation,) basic geometry knowledge (shapes, areas, visualization of cross-sections)
Description: Question: Why don’t buildings and bridges fall down more often?
Answer: Because there are people who have the skills to put together the right materials in the right shape to make them stay up –sometimes even during large earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes.
Have you ever looked at impressive structures like large bridges, skyscrapers, or even private homes, and wondered why they don’t fall down more often? Perhaps you are the kind of person who never gives a second thought to such matters – assuming that structures are all pretty safe. But even a quick look at the history of buildings will show you that they don’t always work. What made the Tacoma Narrows Bridge fall apart in a tame wind in 1940? Why do buildings in Los Angeles survive large earthquakes, while others in other parts of the world (such as in Bam, Iran, 2003) are flattened? This course will introduce students to the engineering world that helps to understand these questions, and to lead some people into the professions related to structural engineering.

Robert Reilly
Palisades High School


* - - - *

Course Title: English 10
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will concentrate on World Literature and will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, a class novel, one self-selected novel, and a Shakespearean play. Students will increase their language skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes and by polishing up on grammar skills. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as students work on improving written communication. All materials are online. There is a self-selected novel that students will find locally at their school or public library. Carol-Anne Villanova
Quabbin Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: English 10 Summer Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer School Extended Session
Prerequisites:
Description: Never been enrolled in an online course or want to take another one?

Have you always wanted to improve your skills in reading, writing, and grammar?

Do you feel that you would like to participate in an online course that allows you to work daily in an environment that allows you to spend more time in those areas that have been obstacles to achieving academic success?

Do you need to make up credit in 10th grade English so that you can move into the next English course with your peers?

Are you interested in exploring a new and exciting way to attend a class that introduces you to other students from high schools across the United States?

If you answered yes to some or all of these questions, then this is the course for you. This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and one novel. You will increase your language skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes and by polishing up on your grammar skills. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to join other high school students in course discussions and activities. Also, you can discuss your thoughts and interests with classmates in a special place in the course that is devoted to nonacademic topics.

Join us this summer! All class materials and assignments are online so you do not have to lug a heavy backpack, pencils, or books to class. The course is just a mouse click away.

Please note that because this course is eight weeks in duration, and students are expected to work approximately ten hours per week, the course will therefore not cover a full year's curriculum with the same depth that is covered in a year-long course. In addition, if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Karen Orfitelli
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: English 11
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will concentrate on American Literature from the Colonial to the Post Modern periods and will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and one self-selected novel, and a Shakespearean play. Students will increase their language skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes and by polishing up on grammar skills. Vocabulary study will include words from the SAT most frequently used word lists. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as students work on improving written communication. We will be doing a course-long timeline project on American culture using 21st century tools.
All materials are online. There is a self-selected novel that students will find locally at their school or public library. Possible titles may include:

1. The Crucible (Arthur Miller)
2. The Scarlet Letter (Nathaniel Hawthorne)
3. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain)
4. Black Boy (Richard Wright)
5. Last of the Mohicans (James Fenimore Cooper)
6. Ethan Frome (Edith Wharton)
7. To Kill a Mockingbird (HarperLee)
8. My Antonia (Willa Cather)
9. The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald)
10. Beloved (Toni Morrison)
11. Of Mice and Men (John Steinbeck)
12. A Farewell to Arms (Ernest Hemingway)
13. Native Son (Richard Wright)
14. The Grapes of Wrath (John Steinbeck)
15. Joy Luck Club (AmyTan)
16. Color Purple (Toni Morrison)
17. House on Mango Street (Sandra Cisneros)
18. Our T own (Thornton Wilder)
19. Buried Onions (Gary Soto)
20. The Devil and Tom Walker (Washington Irving)
21. On the Equality of the Sexes (Judith Sargent Murray)
22. Chief Black Hawk's surrender speech of 1832 (Chief Black Hawk)
23. Olaudah Equino (slave narrative) (Olaudah Equino)
24. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Ken Kesey)
25. One Hundred Years of Solitude (Gabriel Garcia-Marquez)
26. A Raisin in the Sun (Lorraine Hansbury)Kathleen Place
Windsor Locks High School


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Course Title: English 11 Summer Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 11
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer School Extended Session
Prerequisites:
Description: Never been enrolled in an online course or want to take another one?

Have you always wanted to improve your skills in reading, writing, and grammar?

Do you feel that you would like to participate in an online course that allows you to work daily in an environment that allows you to spend more time in those areas that have been obstacles to achieving academic success?

Do you need to make up credit in 11th grade English so that you can move into the next English course with your peers?

Are you interested in exploring a new and exciting way to attend a class that introduces you to other students from high schools across the United States?

If you answered yes to some or all of these questions, then this is the course for you. This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will concentrate on American Literature from the Colonial to the Post Modern periods and will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and one self-selected novel. You will increase your language skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes and by polishing up on your grammar skills. Vocabulary study will include words from the SAT most frequently used word lists. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication. We will be doing a course-long timeline project on American culture using 21st century tools.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to join other high school students in course discussions and activities. Also, you can discuss your thoughts and interests with classmates in a special place in the course that is devoted to nonacademic topics.

Join us this summer! All class materials and assignments are online so you do not have to lug a heavy backpack, pencils, or books to class. The course is just a mouse click away.

There is no media kit. All materials are online. There is a self-selected novel that students will find locally at their school or public library.

Possible titles may include:
1. The Crucible
2. The Scarlet Letter
3. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Twain)
4. The Scarlet Letter (Hawthorne)
5. Black Boy (Wright)
6. Last of the Mohicans (Cooper)
7. Ethan Frome (Wharton)
8. To Kill a Mockingbird (Lee)
9. My Antonia
10. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
11. Beloved by Toni Morrison
12. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
13. A Farewell to Arms(Hemingway)
14. Native Son (Wright)
15. The Grapes of Wrath
16. Joy Luck Club (Tan)
17. Color Purple (Morrison)
18. House on Mango Street (Cisneros)

Please note that because this course is eight weeks in duration, and students are expected to work approximately ten hours per week, the course will therefore not cover a full year's curriculum with the same depth that is covered in a year-long course. In addition, if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school.

Kelly Andreoni
Virtual High School


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Course Title: English 9
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: Description:
This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Leanne Ross
Fairfield County ESC


* - - - *

Course Title: English 9 Summer Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer School Extended Session
Prerequisites:
Description: Never been enrolled in an online course?

Have you always wanted to improve your skills in reading, writing, and grammar?

Do you feel that you would like to participate in an online course that allows you to work daily in an environment that allows you to spend more time in those areas that have been obstacles to achieving academic success?

Do you need to make up credit in 9th grade English so that you can move into the next English course with the rest of your peers?

Are you interested in exploring a new and exciting way to attend a class that introduces you to other students from high schools across the United States?

If you answered yes to some or all of these questions, then this is the course for you. This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and one novel. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to join other high school students in course discussions and activities. Also, you can discuss your thoughts and interests with classmates in a special place in the course that is devoted to nonacademic topics.

Join us this summer! All class materials and assignments are online so you do not have to lug a heavy backpack, pencils, or books to class. The course is just a mouse click away.

“See you” in class!

Please note that because this course is eight weeks in duration, and students are expected to work approximately ten hours per week, the course will therefore not cover a full year's curriculum with the same depth that is covered in a year-long course. In addition, if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Beth Hughes
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: English Literacy Skills Summer Offering: Short Stories
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites:
Description: Join us in a four week summer adventure to enhance your English skills using 21st Century tools! Regular activities will include reading short stories written by a variety of authors from various cultural backgrounds. Students will build basic literacy and vocabulary skills using web 2.0 tools. The instruction is culturally relevant and embraces the technology rich world in which we live.

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Karen Orfitelli
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: English Literacy Skills Summer Offering: The Novel
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites:
Description: Join us in a four week summer adventure to enhance your English skills using 21st Century tools! Regular activities will revolve around the reading of a self selected novel from a list of authors with various cultural backgrounds. Students will build basic literacy and vocabulary skills using web 2.0 tools. The instruction is culturally relevant and embraces the technology rich world in which we live.

Students will select and read one of the following novels:
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey
The Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan
The Bean Trees, Barbara Kingsolver
Pigs in Heaven, Barbara Kingsolver
Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou
The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins
The Color Purple, Alice Walker
House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros
The Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian, Sherman Alexie
One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia-Marquez
Eva Luna, Isabel Allende
In the Time of the Butterflies, Julia Alvarez
Where the Heart Is, Billie Letts
White Oleander, Janet Fitch
Cannery Row, John Steinbeck
Friday Night Lights, H.G. Bissinger
Speak, Laurie Halse Anderson
Monster, Walter Dean Myers
Breathing Underwater, Alex Flinn
Twilight (or other books in this series), Stephanie Meyer
The Gun (or any other book in the Bluford High series), Paul LanganKaren Orfitelli
Virtual High School


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Course Title: Entrepreneurship Section JH
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
An enthusiastic attitude about starting a business and developing a business plan. Good writing and Internet research skills, along with basic to advanced-basic knowledge of: PowerPoint, Excel and Word, OpenOffice.org equivalent programs, or Microsoft Works. Also a willingness to learn new ideas and apply them. Students will also need to be able to access several games during Weeks 1 and 2 and YouTube during Weeks 12 and 13.
Home internet access could be helpful.

Description: Do you have a great idea for a new business or is there a product or service that you know will solve a problem or help consumers? Would you like to find out the procedures and information required to start up a new business venture? Do you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur? Do you feel that you would like to study more about business? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then this may be the course for you.

Entrepreneurship starts to prepare future small business owners to run their own businesses according to the principles of business. It also allows students to experience the entrepreneurial spirit. You will learn how to develop a business idea and write a business plan to promote that idea. Future business people must understand economics, financial statements, marketing and selling techniques, investing, business structures, legal issues, banking, technology and taxation. In entrepreneurship, we will teach you how to use all of these business principles in order to develop a successful business and kindle in you an entrepreneurial spirit that will help you to follow your dreams and reach your goals.

Come join our business group and develop a business that someday could be a great career for you. This is a course where dreams are made into realities.

Judith Hoffman
North Penn High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Entrepreneurship Section KC
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An enthusiastic attitude about starting a business and developing a business plan. Good writing and Internet research skills, along with basic to advanced-basic knowledge of: PowerPoint, Excel and Word, OpenOffice.org equivalent programs, or Microsoft Works. Also a willingness to learn new ideas and apply them. Students will also need to be able to access several games during Weeks 1 and 2 and YouTube during Weeks 12 and 13.
Home internet access could be helpful.
Description: Do you have a great idea for a new business or is there a product or service that you know will solve a problem or help consumers? Would you like to find out the procedures and information required to start up a new business venture? Do you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur? Do you feel that you would like to study more about business? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then this may be the course for you.

Entrepreneurship starts to prepare future small business owners to run their own businesses according to the principles of business. It also allows students to experience the entrepreneurial spirit. You will learn how to develop a business idea and write a business plan to promote that idea. Future business people must understand economics, financial statements, marketing and selling techniques, investing, business structures, legal issues, banking, technology and taxation. In entrepreneurship, we will teach you how to use all of these business principles in order to develop a successful business and kindle in you an entrepreneurial spirit that will help you to follow your dreams and reach your goals.

Come join our business group and develop a business that someday could be a great career for you. This is a course where dreams are made into realities.
Kathleen Cembura
Quaboag Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Entrepreneurship Section LD
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
An enthusiastic attitude about starting a business and developing a business plan. Good writing and Internet research skills, along with basic to advanced-basic knowledge of: PowerPoint, Excel and Word, OpenOffice.org equivalent programs, or Microsoft Works. Also a willingness to learn new ideas and apply them. Students will also need to be able to access several games during Weeks 1 and 2 and YouTube during Weeks 12 and 13.
Home internet access could be helpful.

Description: Do you have a great idea for a new business or is there a product or service that you know will solve a problem or help consumers? Would you like to find out the procedures and information required to start up a new business venture? Do you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur? Do you feel that you would like to study more about business? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then this may be the course for you.

Entrepreneurship starts to prepare future small business owners to run their own businesses according to the principles of business. It also allows students to experience the entrepreneurial spirit. You will learn how to develop a business idea and write a business plan to promote that idea. Future business people must understand economics, financial statements, marketing and selling techniques, investing, business structures, legal issues, banking, technology and taxation. In entrepreneurship, we will teach you how to use all of these business principles in order to develop a successful business and kindle in you an entrepreneurial spirit that will help you to follow your dreams and reach your goals.

Come join our business group and develop a business that someday could be a great career for you. This is a course where dreams are made into realities.

Lyn Decarlo
Coopersville High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Entrepreneurship Section ME
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An enthusiastic attitude about starting a business and developing a business plan. Good writing and Internet research skills, along with basic to advanced-basic knowledge of: PowerPoint, Excel and Word, OpenOffice.org equivalent programs, or Microsoft Works. Also a willingness to learn new ideas and apply them. Students will also need to be able to access several games during Weeks 1 and 2 and YouTube during Weeks 12 and 13.
Home internet access could be helpful.
Description:
Do you have a great idea for a new business or is there a product or service that you know will solve a problem or help consumers? Would you like to find out the procedures and information required to start up a new business venture? Do you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur? Do you feel that you would like to study more about business? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then this may be the course for you.

Entrepreneurship starts to prepare future small business owners to run their own businesses according to the principles of business. It also allows students to experience the entrepreneurial spirit. You will learn how to develop a business idea and write a business plan to promote that idea. Future business people must understand economics, financial statements, marketing and selling techniques, investing, business structures, legal issues, banking, technology and taxation. In entrepreneurship, we will teach you how to use all of these business principles in order to develop a successful business and kindle in you an entrepreneurial spirit that will help you to follow your dreams and reach your goals.

Come join our business group and develop a business that someday could be a great career for you. This is a course where dreams are made into realities.

*Students must have both school and home access to the Internet as well as the software programs noted above.
Maria Ehrhardt
Valley Regional High School


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Course Title: Environmental Chemistry Section SR
Discipline: Science - Chemistry
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Chemistry I or Physical Science with Strong Chemistry Component
Description: The study of Chemistry is useful in finding causes of environmental problems as well as offering a powerful tool to solve these problems. This course gives students an opportunity to deepen their understanding of chemistry by applying basic chemical principles to the study of the environment. The course will be divided into three main segments: (1) Chemistry of the Atmosphere (air environment), (2) Chemistry of the Hydrosphere (water environment) and (3) Independent research on an environmental problem.

In part one, topics to be studied will include: the chemical composition of the atmosphere, the ozone layer, acid rain, photochemical smog, and the "greenhouse effect". Part two will include the study of: the chemical composition of seawater, the process of desalination, and the effects of such parameters as dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and dissolved solids on water quality. A federal, state or municipal cleanup project will be studied in detail. In part three, students will research the chemistry of an environmental problem and hypothesize a solution to the problem studied.

The course assumes familiarity with basic chemistry but concepts studied in general chemistry will be reviewed as the chemistry of the environment is studied. Students will explore environmental topics \ through several varied activities. These will include on-line activities involving Internet search and visits to particular websites as well as projects off-line using home, school, and community resources. The teacher will facilitate this process by serving as mentor in directing students to reliable sources of information and helping the students understand the chemical concepts involved. Students' grades will be based primarily on the successful completion of all assignments when due and their research paper.Sean Reardon
Southeastern Regional Vocational High School


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Course Title: Environmental Science Honors
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Environmental Science provides an opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the environmental challenges that humanity is facing today and our need to develop a sustainable relationship with our planet and its resources. This course focuses on the application of biological, chemical, and physical principles to the study of contemporary environmental issues such as air and water pollution, global climate change, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy resources, soils, deforestation, biodiversity, and endangered species. Using a combination of traditional hands-on laboratory exercises, modern web-based animations and simulations, and an independent research project, this course offers a core laboratory experience that complements the classroom portion through firsthand observations of scientific principles.
Edward Kopp
Pequannock Township High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Environmental Science Honors
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Environmental Science provides an opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the environmental challenges that humanity is facing today and our need to develop a sustainable relationship with our planet and its resources. This course focuses on the application of biological, chemical, and physical principles to the study of contemporary environmental issues such as air and water pollution, global climate change, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy resources, soils, deforestation, biodiversity, and endangered species. Using a combination of traditional hands-on laboratory exercises, modern web-based animations and simulations, and an independent research project, this course offers a core laboratory experience that complements the classroom portion through firsthand observations of scientific principles.
Edward Kopp
Pequannock Township High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Environmental Science Honors Section EK
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Environmental Science provides an opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the environmental challenges that humanity is facing today and our need to develop a sustainable relationship with our planet and its resources. This course focuses on the application of biological, chemical, and physical principles to the study of contemporary environmental issues such as air and water pollution, global climate change, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy resources, soils, deforestation, biodiversity, and endangered species. Using a combination of traditional hands-on laboratory exercises, modern web-based animations and simulations, and an independent research project, this course offers a core laboratory experience that complements the classroom portion through firsthand observations of scientific principles.Edward Kopp
Pequannock Township High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Environmental Science Honors Section EK
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Environmental Science provides an opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the environmental challenges that humanity is facing today and our need to develop a sustainable relationship with our planet and its resources. This course focuses on the application of biological, chemical, and physical principles to the study of contemporary environmental issues such as air and water pollution, global climate change, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy resources, soils, deforestation, biodiversity, and endangered species. Using a combination of traditional hands-on laboratory exercises, modern web-based animations and simulations, and an independent research project, this course offers a core laboratory experience that complements the classroom portion through firsthand observations of scientific principles.Edward Kopp
Pequannock Township High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Environmental Science Section CD
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Environmental Science provides an opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the environmental challenges that humanity is facing today and our need to develop a sustainable relationship with our planet and its resources. This course focuses on the application of biological, chemical, and physical principles to the study of contemporary environmental issues such as air and water pollution, global climate change, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy resources, soils, deforestation, biodiversity, and endangered species. Using a combination of traditional hands-on laboratory exercises, modern web-based animations and simulations, and service learning opportunity, this course offers a core laboratory experience that complements the classroom portion through firsthand observations of environmental principles.Catherine DeNoia
Wheeler High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Environmental Science Section JPB
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Environmental Science provides an opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the environmental challenges that humanity is facing today and our need to develop a sustainable relationship with our planet and its resources. This course focuses on the application of biological, chemical, and physical principles to the study of contemporary environmental issues such as air and water pollution, global climate change, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy resources, soils, deforestation, biodiversity, and endangered species. Using a combination of traditional hands-on laboratory exercises, modern web-based animations and simulations, and service learning opportunity, this course offers a core laboratory experience that complements the classroom portion through firsthand observations of environmental principles.Joanne PettersonBernier
Leicester High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Environmental Science Section SR
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Every day, millions of human and natural activities are altering the planet on which we live. Environmental Science provides an opportunity to develop a broad understanding of the environmental challenges that humanity is facing today and our need to develop a sustainable relationship with our planet and its resources. This course focuses on the application of biological, chemical, and physical principles to the study of contemporary environmental issues such as air and water pollution, global climate change, hazardous and solid waste, alternative energy resources, soils, deforestation, biodiversity, and endangered species. Using a combination of traditional hands-on laboratory exercises, modern web-based animations and simulations, and service learning opportunity, this course offers a core laboratory experience that complements the classroom portion through firsthand observations of environmental principles.Susan Reilly
Woodstock Academy


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Course Title: Epidemics Section KC
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: This course will focus on the biology of epidemics. One of the most fascinating and frightening aspects of disease, epidemics are known to have affected civilizations, medicine, and human interactions since the beginning of written history. Today, our battle against epidemic diseases continues, despite medical successes and our improved understanding of the causes and process of disease. Indeed, exotic new diseases are emerging, and those considered controlled are re-emerging in more virulent, resistant forms. News reports are documenting outbreaks of strange diseases in both underdeveloped regions and those with the highest levels of medical care.

This course is designed to enable the student to understand why new diseases are appearing and why those we thought conquered are reappearing. This is done in the context of basic concepts upon which our understanding of biology is built. The role of evolution is linked with that of ecology to give a framework in which to examine and understand the "plagues" that are occurring worldwide. Epidemic diseases will be analyzed using the concepts of succession in natural ecological systems and the evolutionary pressures and processes that drive them. We will also use this framework to help us predict how our present actions will affect the future course of disease.

This course is also concerned with the impact of plagues of the past and the public health response to manage them. Students will read documents such as Thucydides' account of the plague in ancient Greece, reports of the plagues of the 1890's in Bombay, and Camus' "The Plague".

Current information on infectious diseases and their treatment and control are available through many on-line resources. Students will explore these resources to understand diseases that are of interest to them and prepare reports to be discussed with other students. Students will also complete lab exercises, examine case histories, and perform simulations to better understand the impact of infectious diseases on populations. A final student-created project will allow students to demonstrate their understanding of epidemic disease processes. Kathleen Chase
Mount View High School


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Course Title: Essay Writing Section 1 Private Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Cincinnati Prep**

Do you want to improve your writing skills? This course helps fill in the gaps. By the end of the class, students will write several different types of essays. There will also be refresher work on capitalization, parts of speech, common proofreading errors, and basic punctuation. The class is moderately paced and is appropriate for a student who needs a boost in skills but is highly motivated. English Language Learners are welcome, but this is not appropriate for students with rudimentary English. The class focuses on having students study, complete, and revise work in order to master skills. Karen Orfitelli
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Essay Writing Section 2 Private Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Cincinnati Prep**

Do you want to improve your writing skills? This course helps fill in the gaps. By the end of the class, students will write several different types of essays. There will also be refresher work on capitalization, parts of speech, common proofreading errors, and basic punctuation. The class is moderately paced and is appropriate for a student who needs a boost in skills but is highly motivated. English Language Learners are welcome, but this is not appropriate for students with rudimentary English. The class focuses on having students study, complete, and revise work in order to master skills. Karen Orfitelli
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Essay Writing Section CD
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Have a student who needs to tweak his grammar? This course helps
fill in the gaps on capitalization, parts of speech, common
proofreading errors and basic punctuation. By the end of the class,
students will write a basic, portfolio-quality essay. Class is
moderately-paced, and is appropriate for a student who needs a boost
in skills, but is highly motivated. English Language Learners are
welcome, but this is not appropriate for students with rudimentary
English. Class focuses on having students study, complete and
revise work in order to master skills.Carol Duffy
Marian High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Evolution and the Nature of Science Section PB
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Evolution is the cornerstone of modern biology. It unites all the fields of biology under one theoretical umbrella. Evolution and the Nature of Science" is a course where you will travel - back in time, forward in time and to the far corners of the scientific realm. In this course you will explore the concept of Evolution - the core theme of all biology and you will investigate the impact that science has on our lives and on our thinking. Most importantly, you will venture into the very "Nature of the Scientific Process!" Biological evolution accounts for three of the most fundamental features of the world around us: the similarities among living things, the diversity of life, and many features of the physical world we inhabit. Explanations of these phenomena in terms of evolution draw on results from physics, chemistry, geology, many areas of biology, and other sciences. Thus, evolution is the central organizing principle that biologists use to understand the world.

Much of the work you do will take you exploring on the World Wide Web, but you will also investigate the processes of evolution in "your own backyard" and look at the Nature of Science all around you. Evolution and the Nature Of Science provides an extremely active and rich source of new insights into the world. By exploring the history of life on earth and shedding light on how evolution works, evolutionary biology is linking fundamental scientific research to knowledge needed to meet important societal needs, including the preservation of our environment. Few other ideas in science have had such a far-reaching impact on our thinking about ourselves and how we relate to the world.Christine Colella
NCES


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Course Title: Fantasy and Science Fiction Short Stories Section EP
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: The course will begin with a discussion of the fantasy and science fiction genres. We will try to figure out what elements determine the genre, that is, what key, essential ingredients are necessary for prose to be classified “fantasy and/or science fiction". We will go on to investigate the question, "What makes a story great?"

Throughout the course we will read short stories and discuss them in detail. We will examine the icons of these genres including CS Lewis, JRR Tolkien, and Phillip K. Dick.

Finally, you will write three short stories, including a very short one (a single page), a longer one (5-8 double-spaced pages) and a very long one (10-12 double spaced pages). These stories will be peer-reviewed and I will cast my own opinions into the ring. Ultimately stories are meant to please an audience and some of the best feedback you will get will come from your readers.

The writing you do will grow and change as we continue to read more and different styles of SF. By the end of the course, you should have gained a solid understanding of the conventions of the genre and its historical developments.

Note: NCAA approval is under Science Fiction Short StoriesEmily Prager
Shanghai American School - Pudong Campus


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Course Title: Fantasy and Science Fiction Short Stories Section LP
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: The course will begin with a discussion of the fantasy and science fiction genres. We will try to figure out what elements determine the genre, that is, what key, essential ingredients are necessary for prose to be classified “fantasy and/or science fiction". We will go on to investigate the question, "What makes a story great?"

Throughout the course we will read short stories and discuss them in detail. We will examine the icons of these genres including CS Lewis, JRR Tolkien, and Phillip K. Dick.

Finally, you will write three short stories, including a very short one (a single page), a longer one (5-8 double-spaced pages) and a very long one (10-12 double spaced pages). These stories will be peer-reviewed and I will cast my own opinions into the ring. Ultimately stories are meant to please an audience and some of the best feedback you will get will come from your readers.

The writing you do will grow and change as we continue to read more and different styles of SF. By the end of the course, you should have gained a solid understanding of the conventions of the genre and its historical developments.

Note: NCAA approval is under Science Fiction Short StoriesLisa Pupo
Spring-Ford Senior High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Film and Literature Section TR: The European Experience
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Note: Students will be asked whether or not they require course materials in the first week of class. Most materials used within this course are readily available, and students will be selecting their own materials from a variety of sources. If students require materials, they should (within their first week of class) notify their course instructor, who will then provide the necessary texts.
Description: Do you enjoy movies, literature and history and making choices? Did you ever want to be a movie critic? Do you want to explore how Hollywood treats history? Do you want to see some of the classic movies from the 1940’s-1980’s? Do you want to test your time management skills prior to college? Then this is the course for you… come join me on a voyage from the steppes of Russia to the streets of Berlin and the battlefields of the “War to end all wars”!!

In this humanities/social sciences offering, you will become movie critics, readers of some of the world’s finest 20th century novels, and work on unique projects with students across the nation. You will explore the momentous events of the first part of the 20th century as they were depicted in literature and on film.

The course focuses on three pivotal changes. 1) WWI and the Revolution; 2) 1920's - WWII; 3) the Cold War. The course will bring you through those periods through the literature of the time. Among the literary works you will read (from Pasternak's "Dr. Zhivago" to Forsyth's "The Odessa File"), you will also view their film adaptations that visually portray the life of the people living on the continent (Europe) during this fascinating time as well!

Come join us on the web and expand your literary, cinematic and historical horizons..Thomas Reid
Woodstock Union High School and Middle School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Film and Literature Section TR: The European Experience
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Note: Students will be asked whether or not they require course materials in the first week of class. Most materials used within this course are readily available, and students will be selecting their own materials from a variety of sources. If students require materials, they should (within their first week of class) notify their course instructor, who will then provide the necessary texts.
Description: Do you enjoy movies, literature and history and making choices? Did you ever want to be a movie critic? Do you want to explore how Hollywood treats history? Do you want to see some of the classic movies from the 1940’s-1980’s? Do you want to test your time management skills prior to college? Then this is the course for you… come join me on a voyage from the steppes of Russia to the streets of Berlin and the battlefields of the “War to end all wars”!!

In this humanities/social sciences offering, you will become movie critics, readers of some of the world’s finest 20th century novels, and work on unique projects with students across the nation. You will explore the momentous events of the first part of the 20th century as they were depicted in literature and on film.

The course focuses on three pivotal changes. 1) WWI and the Revolution; 2) 1920's - WWII; 3) the Cold War. The course will bring you through those periods through the literature of the time. Among the literary works you will read (from Pasternak's "Dr. Zhivago" to Forsyth's "The Odessa File"), you will also view their film adaptations that visually portray the life of the people living on the continent (Europe) during this fascinating time as well!

Come join us on the web and expand your literary, cinematic and historical horizons..Thomas Reid
Woodstock Union High School and Middle School


* - - - *

Course Title: Financial Literacy Summer Offering
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites:
Description: After successfully completing Financial Literacy, you will be able to:
· analyze, manage, and monitor your saving and spending habits.
· identify your personal financial goals and determine ways to attain these goals.
· distinguish between gross and net income.
· compare and contrast among financial institutions.
· assess the importance of maintaining good credit.
· classify the different types of insurance and justify the purpose of having it.
· evaluate good investment opportunities.
· analyze future financial situations and apply the skills learned in Personal Finance in making wise and
beneficial choices to live a secure and stable life.

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Folklore and Literature of Myth, Magic, and Ritual Section AB
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Want to know what your ESP ability is? Want to really find out what's behind the story about that haunted house in your neighborhood? Curious about parapsychology? Do you think you may have been visited by aliens, or do you know someone who thinks they have been abducted? If so, this course may be for you!

This English course will explore common elements in the literature of modern mythology, current folklore, and literature involving magic and the mystical. Students will read novels by Lois Lowry, Stephen King, Robert Cormier, and Toni Morrison. Students will research and analyze the phenomena described in the literature.

Students will investigate and contribute legends/scare stories from their locales as the class conducts its investigation into the social purposes served by such modern folklore. The current obsession with the paranormal and alien visitation as it applies to modern myth and folklore will also be explored.

Please note: The emphasis of this course is on modern folklore which, in an Information Age, is significantly different from historical folklore. It should also be noted that this is an Honors level English course. Be prepared to read, to write, and to discuss!Amanda Boswell
Portsmouth High School RI


* - - - *

Course Title: Folklore and Literature of Myth, Magic, and Ritual Section MH
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Want to know what your ESP ability is? Want to really find out what's behind the story about that haunted house in your neighborhood? Curious about parapsychology? Do you think you may have been visited by aliens, or do you know someone who thinks they have been abducted? If so, this course may be for you!

This English course will explore common elements in the literature of modern mythology, current folklore, and literature involving magic and the mystical. Students will read novels by Lois Lowry, Stephen King, Robert Cormier, and Toni Morrison. Students will research and analyze the phenomena described in the literature.

Students will investigate and contribute legends/scare stories from their locales as the class conducts its investigation into the social purposes served by such modern folklore. The current obsession with the paranormal and alien visitation as it applies to modern myth and folklore will also be explored.

Please note: The emphasis of this course is on modern folklore which, in an Information Age, is significantly different from historical folklore. It should also be noted that this is an Honors level English course. Be prepared to read, to write, and to discuss!Michelle Hoover
Nashoba Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Forensic Science
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description:

Forensics will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of techniques and strategies used by forensic scientists. They will learn the steps involved in analyzing a crime scene in order to provide evidence that will be admissible in a court of law. Emphasis is placed on the investigative process. They will get a detailed knowledge of the industry in order to explore the potential for careers in forensic science.

Students will research different methods that forensic scientists use to solve crimes and analyze crime scene data to solve crimes themselves. Topics include collecting evidence, fingerprinting, blood-typing, ballistics, trace evidence, anthropology, and of course, DNA!

Students will need access to a scanner to share images such as fingerprints.Erin Mucci
McCann Technical School


* - - - *

Course Title: Forensic Science Section EB
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description:
Forensics will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of techniques and strategies used by forensic scientists. They will learn the steps involved in analyzing a crime scene in order to provide evidence that will be admissible in a court of law. Emphasis is placed on the investigative process. They will get a detailed knowledge of the industry in order to explore the potential for careers in forensic science.

Students will research different methods that forensic scientists use to solve crimes and analyze crime scene data to solve crimes themselves. Topics include collecting evidence, fingerprinting, blood-typing, ballistics, trace evidence, anthropology, and of course, DNA!

Students will need access to a scanner to share images such as fingerprints.Erica Brown
Barnstable High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Forensic Science Section EK
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Forensics will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of techniques and strategies used by forensic scientists. They will learn the steps involved in analyzing a crime scene in order to provide evidence that will be admissible in a court of law. Emphasis is placed on the investigative process. They will get a detailed knowledge of the industry in order to explore the potential for careers in forensic science.

Students will research different methods that forensic scientists use to solve crimes and analyze crime scene data to solve crimes themselves. Topics include collecting evidence, fingerprinting, blood-typing, ballistics, trace evidence, anthropology, and of course, DNA!

Students will need access to a scanner to share images such as fingerprints.Erika Kindoll
Tulpehocken High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Forensic Science Section MD
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description:
Forensics will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of techniques and strategies used by forensic scientists. They will learn the steps involved in analyzing a crime scene in order to provide evidence that will be admissible in a court of law. Emphasis is placed on the investigative process. They will get a detailed knowledge of the industry in order to explore the potential for careers in forensic science.

Students will research different methods that forensic scientists use to solve crimes and analyze crime scene data to solve crimes themselves. Topics include collecting evidence, fingerprinting, blood-typing, ballistics, trace evidence, anthropology, and of course, DNA!

Students will need access to a scanner to share images such as fingerprints.Melissa Diguette
Auburn High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Forensic Science Section MP
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Forensics will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of techniques and strategies used by forensic scientists. They will learn the steps involved in analyzing a crime scene in order to provide evidence that will be admissible in a court of law. Emphasis is placed on the investigative process. They will get a detailed knowledge of the industry in order to explore the potential for careers in forensic science.

Students will research different methods that forensic scientists use to solve crimes and analyze crime scene data to solve crimes themselves. Topics include collecting evidence, fingerprinting, blood-typing, ballistics, trace evidence, anthropology, and of course, DNA!

Students will need access to a scanner to share images such as fingerprints. Martha Peters
Edison Preparatory School


* - - - *

Course Title: Forensic Science Section SL
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description:
Forensics will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of techniques and strategies used by forensic scientists. They will learn the steps involved in analyzing a crime scene in order to provide evidence that will be admissible in a court of law. Emphasis is placed on the investigative process. They will get a detailed knowledge of the industry in order to explore the potential for careers in forensic science.

Students will research different methods that forensic scientists use to solve crimes and analyze crime scene data to solve crimes themselves. Topics include collecting evidence, fingerprinting, blood-typing, ballistics, trace evidence, anthropology, and of course, DNA!

Students will need access to a scanner to share images such as fingerprints.Stacey Leitz
Westerly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: French Language and Culture Section GC
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: A readiness to fall in love with all things French, acquire savoir faire, and perhaps become a Francophile (somebody who loves anything French). Did you know that over one third of English words come from French? The course is taught primarily in English with French phrases sprinkled liberally throughout so you will become au courant -a connoisseur of Francophone culture. It is designed for students whose English language skills are strong. This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge of French is required.

Technology requirements:
Students will need access to some type of word processing program, presentation software such as Power Point, Prezi, or Keynote. They will need whichever plug-ins the Web sites we use may require (Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, etc.) and a media player such as Quicktime and Windows Media Player.

This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, a microphone, and recording software to save files in audio format . Access to a Webcam is a plus and video recording may be offered as an option for some assignments . Innovative Internet resources will be utilized in the course so students will have to be ready to learn how to use them at the site and read the directions or watch a tutorial.

Description: Journey with us for fifteen weeks across the globe and indeed time itself to learn the basics of French language and culture. We will meander through French history and get to know some of its 64 kings as we savor French cuisine and virtually sample some of its 246 kinds of cheese. We may even pair it with some bread as we watch Anthony Bourdain show us how a baguette is made!

We will discover why such famous authors such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, and others flocked to Paris as the cultural capitol of Europe. According to the online France Travel Guide “When it comes to style, art, culture, food and drink, the French are the undisputed kings and Paris is their crown jewel”. You’ll learn to sing the French national anthem, la Marseillaise, and learn why the fleur-de-lys has always been such a good luck charm for French kings.

But French-speaking culture does not stop at France’s borders… Pas du tout! There is a vast Francophonie beyond the land of Louis XIV and Madame de Maintenon. Indeed, two out of every three Francophones live outside of France. The Francophonie, an official organization, consists of 56 member states with others as Associates. From Cameroon to Côte d’Ivoire, the DOM-TOM, Seychelles to Djibouti, all share a common cultural heritage. We will learn this and so much more in the next 15 weeks. Bon voyage and allons-y (we’re off)!Gail Corder
Trinity Valley School


* - - - *

Course Title: French Language and Culture Section KA
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: A readiness to fall in love with all things French, acquire savoir faire, and perhaps become a Francophile (somebody who loves anything French). Did you know that over one third of English words come from French? The course is taught primarily in English with French phrases sprinkled liberally throughout so you will become au courant -a connoisseur of Francophone culture. It is designed for students whose English language skills are strong. This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge of French is required.

Technology requirements:
Students will need access to some type of word processing program, presentation software such as Power Point, Prezi, or Keynote. They will need whichever plug-ins the Web sites we use may require (Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, etc.) and a media player such as Quicktime and Windows Media Player.

This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, a microphone, and recording software to save files in audio format . Access to a Webcam is a plus and video recording may be offered as an option for some assignments . Innovative Internet resources will be utilized in the course so students will have to be ready to learn how to use them at the site and read the directions or watch a tutorial.

Description: Journey with us for fifteen weeks across the globe and indeed time itself to learn the basics of French language and culture. We will meander through French history and get to know some of its 64 kings as we savor French cuisine and virtually sample some of its 246 kinds of cheese. We may even pair it with some bread as we watch Anthony Bourdain show us how a baguette is made!

We will discover why such famous authors such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, and others flocked to Paris as the cultural capitol of Europe. According to the online France Travel Guide “When it comes to style, art, culture, food and drink, the French are the undisputed kings and Paris is their crown jewel”. You’ll learn to sing the French national anthem, la Marseillaise, and learn why the fleur-de-lys has always been such a good luck charm for French kings.

But French-speaking culture does not stop at France’s borders… Pas du tout! There is a vast Francophonie beyond the land of Louis XIV and Madame de Maintenon. Indeed, two out of every three Francophones live outside of France. The Francophonie, an official organization, consists of 56 member states with others as Associates. From Cameroon to Côte d’Ivoire, the DOM-TOM, Seychelles to Djibouti, all share a common cultural heritage. We will learn this and so much more in the next 15 weeks. Bon voyage and allons-y (we’re off)!Kelly Angileri
Academy of Information Technology and Engineering


* - - - *

Course Title: Genes and Disease Section DK
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Buried in the cells of each newborn is a unique set of genetic instructions. These molecular blueprints not only shape how the child will grow and develop and whether it will have brown eyes or blue, but what sorts of medical problems it might encounter. Errors in our genes, our genetic material, are responsible for an estimated 3,000-4,000 hereditary diseases, including Huntington disease, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What's more, altered genes are now known to play a part in cancer, heart disease, diabetes and many other common diseases. Genetic flaws increase a person's risk of developing these more common and complex disorders. The diseases themselves stem from interactions of genetic predispositions and environmental factors, including diet and lifestyle.

Human Genetics has many areas of expertise. This course will focus on four areas, (1) classical or Mendelian genetics, diseases where major effects are from a single gene, (2) multifactorial inheritance, continuous traits and discontinuous traits where several genes plus environmental factors are involved, (3) cytogenetics, diseases involving chromosomal abnormalities, and (4) mathematical genetics, including population genetics, linkage, and mapping.Dennis King
Central Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Genes and Disease Section DK2
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Buried in the cells of each newborn is a unique set of genetic instructions. These molecular blueprints not only shape how the child will grow and develop and whether it will have brown eyes or blue, but what sorts of medical problems it might encounter. Errors in our genes, our genetic material, are responsible for an estimated 3,000-4,000 hereditary diseases, including Huntington disease, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What's more, altered genes are now known to play a part in cancer, heart disease, diabetes and many other common diseases. Genetic flaws increase a person's risk of developing these more common and complex disorders. The diseases themselves stem from interactions of genetic predispositions and environmental factors, including diet and lifestyle.

Human Genetics has many areas of expertise. This course will focus on four areas, (1) classical or Mendelian genetics, diseases where major effects are from a single gene, (2) multifactorial inheritance, continuous traits and discontinuous traits where several genes plus environmental factors are involved, (3) cytogenetics, diseases involving chromosomal abnormalities, and (4) mathematical genetics, including population genetics, linkage, and mapping.Dennis King
Central Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Genes and Disease Section HS
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Buried in the cells of each newborn is a unique set of genetic instructions. These molecular blueprints not only shape how the child will grow and develop and whether it will have brown eyes or blue, but what sorts of medical problems it might encounter. Errors in our genes, our genetic material, are responsible for an estimated 3,000-4,000 hereditary diseases, including Huntington disease, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What's more, altered genes are now known to play a part in cancer, heart disease, diabetes and many other common diseases. Genetic flaws increase a person's risk of developing these more common and complex disorders. The diseases themselves stem from interactions of genetic predispositions and environmental factors, including diet and lifestyle.

Human Genetics has many areas of expertise. This course will focus on four areas, (1) classical or Mendelian genetics, diseases where major effects are from a single gene, (2) multifactorial inheritance, continuous traits and discontinuous traits where several genes plus environmental factors are involved, (3) cytogenetics, diseases involving chromosomal abnormalities, and (4) mathematical genetics, including population genetics, linkage, and mapping.Heather Salemme
Groton Dunstable Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Genes and Disease Section JC
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Buried in the cells of each newborn is a unique set of genetic instructions. These molecular blueprints not only shape how the child will grow and develop and whether it will have brown eyes or blue, but what sorts of medical problems it might encounter. Errors in our genes, our genetic material, are responsible for an estimated 3,000-4,000 hereditary diseases, including Huntington disease, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What's more, altered genes are now known to play a part in cancer, heart disease, diabetes and many other common diseases. Genetic flaws increase a person's risk of developing these more common and complex disorders. The diseases themselves stem from interactions of genetic predispositions and environmental factors, including diet and lifestyle.

Human Genetics has many areas of expertise. This course will focus on four areas, (1) classical or Mendelian genetics, diseases where major effects are from a single gene, (2) multifactorial inheritance, continuous traits and discontinuous traits where several genes plus environmental factors are involved, (3) cytogenetics, diseases involving chromosomal abnormalities, and (4) mathematical genetics, including population genetics, linkage, and mapping.John Clauss
Berks Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Genes and Disease Section MH
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Buried in the cells of each newborn is a unique set of genetic instructions. These molecular blueprints not only shape how the child will grow and develop and whether it will have brown eyes or blue, but what sorts of medical problems it might encounter. Errors in our genes, our genetic material, are responsible for an estimated 3,000-4,000 hereditary diseases, including Huntington disease, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What's more, altered genes are now known to play a part in cancer, heart disease, diabetes and many other common diseases. Genetic flaws increase a person's risk of developing these more common and complex disorders. The diseases themselves stem from interactions of genetic predispositions and environmental factors, including diet and lifestyle.

Human Genetics has many areas of expertise. This course will focus on four areas, (1) classical or Mendelian genetics, diseases where major effects are from a single gene, (2) multifactorial inheritance, continuous traits and discontinuous traits where several genes plus environmental factors are involved, (3) cytogenetics, diseases involving chromosomal abnormalities, and (4) mathematical genetics, including population genetics, linkage, and mapping.Malvina Holloway
Eugene Public School District 4J


* - - - *

Course Title: Genes and Disease Section TM
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Description: Buried in the cells of each newborn is a unique set of genetic instructions. These molecular blueprints not only shape how the child will grow and develop and whether it will have brown eyes or blue, but what sorts of medical problems it might encounter. Errors in our genes, our genetic material, are responsible for an estimated 3,000-4,000 hereditary diseases, including Huntington disease, cystic fibrosis, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What's more, altered genes are now known to play a part in cancer, heart disease, diabetes and many other common diseases. Genetic flaws increase a person's risk of developing these more common and complex disorders. The diseases themselves stem from interactions of genetic predispositions and environmental factors, including diet and lifestyle.

Human Genetics has many areas of expertise. This course will focus on four areas, (1) classical or Mendelian genetics, diseases where major effects are from a single gene, (2) multifactorial inheritance, continuous traits and discontinuous traits where several genes plus environmental factors are involved, (3) cytogenetics, diseases involving chromosomal abnormalities, and (4) mathematical genetics, including population genetics, linkage, and mapping.Timothy Mccue
Mount St. Joseph Academy VT


* - - - *

Course Title: Geometry and Algebra Applications Section MC
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Algebra I, graphing calculator and TI Connect software/cable required
Description: What do a family tree, a garden, and a business have in common? Math! In this course you'll learn how to actually use the math you learn in high school. You'll use math to express your creativity, and learn how geometry can help you maximize space in a garden. You will learn to relate algebra and geometry to each other and to the world around you. You will use Algebra topics such as proportions, linear and non-linear functions, to solve Geometry problems and explore real world applications. You will create designs, describe your own business, create a family tree, and even write a short story! Join us as we discover applications for algebra and geometry all around us. Michelle Cartagena
Burncoat High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Geometry Private Offering Section JB
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Scofield Magnet Middle School***

This course emphasizes a detailed exploration of geometric properties, congruency and similarity, and interpreting algebraic equations and inequalities geometrically. Translations of fixed objects on the coordinate plane as well as geometric probability and right triangle trigonometry will also be explored in detail. Plane and solid geometric shapes are studied with an emphasis on real world applications. Students will develop formal and informal proof using deductive reasoning skills. A variety of interactive tools and programs will be used to help students visualize and apply concepts.

There is no textbook for this course. All instructional materials are either provided in the course or located on content related websites. Various free programs such as Geogebra, will be used for investigations.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*
Joe Butkovsky
Scofield Magnet Middle School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Geometry Private Offering Section JB
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Scofield Magnet Middle School***

This course emphasizes a detailed exploration of geometric properties, congruency and similarity, and interpreting algebraic equations and inequalities geometrically. Translations of fixed objects on the coordinate plane as well as geometric probability and right triangle trigonometry will also be explored in detail. Plane and solid geometric shapes are studied with an emphasis on real world applications. Students will develop formal and informal proof using deductive reasoning skills. A variety of interactive tools and programs will be used to help students visualize and apply concepts.

There is no textbook for this course. All instructional materials are either provided in the course or located on content related websites. Various free programs such as Geogebra, will be used for investigations.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*
Ljiljana Djinovic
Scofield Magnet Middle School


* - - - *

Course Title: Geometry Section JR
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: This course emphasizes a detailed exploration of geometric properties, congruency and similarity, and interpreting algebraic equations and inequalities geometrically. Translations of fixed objects on the coordinate plane as well as geometric probability and right triangle trigonometry will also be explored in detail. Plane and solid geometric shapes are studied with an emphasis on real world applications. Students will develop formal and informal proof using deductive reasoning skills. A variety of interactive tools and programs will be used to help students visualize and apply concepts.

There is no textbook for this course. All instructional materials are either provided in the course or located on content related websites. Various free programs such as Geogebra, will be used for investigations.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*
Jack Rua
Lewis S. Mills High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Geometry Summer Offering
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer School Extended Session
Prerequisites:
Description: This is an eight week informal Geometry course. The course emphasizes the relationships among geometric figures and concepts and applies them to real world applications.
The concepts of points, lines, planes, parallel lines, congruence, similarity, polygons, coordinate geometry, area, volume, circles, and right triangle trigonometry will be explored. Students will apply logical thinking throughout the course, without an emphasis on formal proofs. Students are expected to have, and be able to use, solid algebra skills to solve problems in each topic area. Internet resources are used throughout the course to explore and instruct the topics presented.

Media:
There is no text for this course. All instruction materials are either provided in the course or located on content related websites. Geogebra, a free geometry software application, will be downloaded and used for constructions and investigations.

Please note that because this course is eight weeks in duration, and students are expected to work approximately ten hours per week, the course will therefore not cover a full year's curriculum with the same depth that is covered in a year-long course. In addition, if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school. Kara Gansman
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: German Language and Culture
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An interest in the German language and the German-speaking world along with an interest in drawing connections and comparisons between your own language and country and those in the German-speaking world.

This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge or experience with German is necessary.

Technology Requirements:
Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: Are you curious about or drawn to the German language and culture? Would you like to learn a little bit of the language and explore the country with other students from around the world? In this introductory course, you will learn some basic language skills and be introduced to both contemporary and historical German culture.

The fifteen weeks of instruction will balance language and culture, and students will use powerpoint presentations, voice recordings, authentic German websites, German songs, videos and snapshots from the German-speaking world, radio broadcasts, and newspaper/magazine articles to support their learning.

Students can look forward to the following topics: greetings and good-byes; the alphabet and pronunciations; describing themselves, friends, and family members; numbers and counting; telling time; German pronouns and articles; asking and answering basic questions; describing the seasons and weather; describing home; expressing interests and hobbies; talking about food, books, movies, music, and shopping; recognizing basic rules of German word order.

Right alongside these language components, students will also: learn about German geography; learn about famous Germans throughout history; look into contemporary German family life; explore German holidays and celebrations; look into German city life and country life; plan a virtual trip to a city in the German-speaking world; learn about establishments such as restaurants, cafés, museums, and train stations; gain exposure to German music; increase knowledge of fairy tales; and take a look into modern German history. Kerry Anderson
Kennebec Valley Alliance


* - - - *

Course Title: German Language and Culture Section JM
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An interest in the German language and the German-speaking world along with an interest in drawing connections and comparisons between your own language and country and those in the German-speaking world.

This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge or experience with German is necessary.

Technology Requirements:
Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: Are you curious about or drawn to the German language and culture? Would you like to learn a little bit of the language and explore the country with other students from around the world? In this introductory course, you will learn some basic language skills and be introduced to both contemporary and historical German culture.

The fifteen weeks of instruction will balance language and culture, and students will use powerpoint presentations, voice recordings, authentic German websites, German songs, videos and snapshots from the German-speaking world, radio broadcasts, and newspaper/magazine articles to support their learning.

Students can look forward to the following topics: greetings and good-byes; the alphabet and pronunciations; describing themselves, friends, and family members; numbers and counting; telling time; German pronouns and articles; asking and answering basic questions; describing the seasons and weather; describing home; expressing interests and hobbies; talking about food, books, movies, music, and shopping; recognizing basic rules of German word order.

Right alongside these language components, students will also: learn about German geography; learn about famous Germans throughout history; look into contemporary German family life; explore German holidays and celebrations; look into German city life and country life; plan a virtual trip to a city in the German-speaking world; learn about establishments such as restaurants, cafés, museums, and train stations; gain exposure to German music; increase knowledge of fairy tales; and take a look into modern German history. Jared Maul
Newburyport High School


* - - - *

Course Title: German Language and Culture Section LZ
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An interest in the German language and the German-speaking world along with an interest in drawing connections and comparisons between your own language and country and those in the German-speaking world.

This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge or experience with German is necessary.

Technology Requirements:
Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: Are you curious about or drawn to the German language and culture? Would you like to learn a little bit of the language and explore the country with other students from around the world? In this introductory course, you will learn some basic language skills and be introduced to both contemporary and historical German culture.

The fifteen weeks of instruction will balance language and culture, and students will use powerpoint presentations, voice recordings, authentic German websites, German songs, videos and snapshots from the German-speaking world, radio broadcasts, and newspaper/magazine articles to support their learning.

Students can look forward to the following topics: greetings and good-byes; the alphabet and pronunciations; describing themselves, friends, and family members; numbers and counting; telling time; German pronouns and articles; asking and answering basic questions; describing the seasons and weather; describing home; expressing interests and hobbies; talking about food, books, movies, music, and shopping; recognizing basic rules of German word order.

Right alongside these language components, students will also: learn about German geography; learn about famous Germans throughout history; look into contemporary German family life; explore German holidays and celebrations; look into German city life and country life; plan a virtual trip to a city in the German-speaking world; learn about establishments such as restaurants, cafés, museums, and train stations; gain exposure to German music; increase knowledge of fairy tales; and take a look into modern German history. Lynn Zerfass
Hatboro-Horsham High School


* - - - *

Course Title: German Language and Culture Section MO
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An interest in the German language and the German-speaking world along with an interest in drawing connections and comparisons between your own language and country and those in the German-speaking world.

This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge or experience with German is necessary.

Technology Requirements:
Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: Are you curious about or drawn to the German language and culture? Would you like to learn a little bit of the language and explore the country with other students from around the world? In this introductory course, you will learn some basic language skills and be introduced to both contemporary and historical German culture.

The fifteen weeks of instruction will balance language and culture, and students will use powerpoint presentations, voice recordings, authentic German websites, German songs, videos and snapshots from the German-speaking world, radio broadcasts, and newspaper/magazine articles to support their learning.

Students can look forward to the following topics: greetings and good-byes; the alphabet and pronunciations; describing themselves, friends, and family members; numbers and counting; telling time; German pronouns and articles; asking and answering basic questions; describing the seasons and weather; describing home; expressing interests and hobbies; talking about food, books, movies, music, and shopping; recognizing basic rules of German word order.

Right alongside these language components, students will also: learn about German geography; learn about famous Germans throughout history; look into contemporary German family life; explore German holidays and celebrations; look into German city life and country life; plan a virtual trip to a city in the German-speaking world; learn about establishments such as restaurants, cafés, museums, and train stations; gain exposure to German music; increase knowledge of fairy tales; and take a look into modern German history. Miriam O'brien
Marshall School


* - - - *

Course Title: Ghoulies, Ghosties, and Long-Legged Beasties Section EC
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Must have an interest in reading; skills in word processing, keyboarding, use of the Internet and parental consent.
Description: In this course, students will explore why people actually seem to enjoy being frightened. Through literature (poetry, short stories, novels), movies and television, we will explore the history of horror as a genre.

Please note: This is an English course. The course consists of an overview of literature featuring ghosts.

Kinds of Assignments:
* discussions and other postings in response to readings, writings and research;
* a short story about angels and demons written by you;
* vocabulary and vocabulary quizzes
* a novel group project
* a movie essay or critique

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Eleanor Capasso
Ayer High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Ghoulies, Ghosties, and Long-Legged Beasties Section GC
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Must have an interest in reading; skills in word processing, keyboarding, use of the Internet and parental consent.
Description: In this course, students will explore why people actually seem to enjoy being frightened. Through literature (poetry, short stories, novels), movies and television, we will explore the history of horror as a genre.

Please note: This is an English course. The course consists of an overview of literature featuring ghosts.

Kinds of Assignments:
* discussions and other postings in response to readings, writings and research;
* a short story about angels and demons written by you;
* vocabulary and vocabulary quizzes
* a novel group project
* a movie essay or critique

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Greg Cunningham
Hull High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Government Honors Section JC: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description:
Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Have you ever asked yourself the following questions:
Why is American politics dominated by two parties?
How come electoral votes seem to matter more in presidential elections than individual votes?
How can America claim to be the country of "liberty and justice for all" when I hear and see stories about injustices and violations of individual freedoms?
How can I make my political voice heard when I am just one of 300 million citizens?
Why do we allow millions of illegal aliens into the United States every year when many legal U. S. residents are living in poverty?

If you have wondered about complicated questions like these, or if reading the questions above has generated a spark of intellectual curiosity, then you might want to consider signing up for this course.

This course is designed for motivated students who are interested in attaining a well-rounded perspective in American government. The course will provide students with an introductory look at the major aspects of government that every American citizen should know. Students will become familiar with the major institutions, groups, and political beliefs in the American governmental system. Course activities will include discussion groups, short papers, peer feedback, interactive website assignments, and student projects. While significant content will be included as part of this course, a major focus will be on stimulating an interest and passion in the subject of government, with the idea of becoming an educated and involved civic citizen in an increasingly complex world.

If you have actually read this far in the course description I feel obliged to provide you with the following warning, just in case you decide to take this class:

1) You are likely to have more fun than you thought possible in a government class!
2) Some of the issues covered in this course are controversial in nature, so be prepared to have your personal views challenged in the form of healthy, productive debates with your peers!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Janet Chandler
Poultney High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Government Honors Section JC: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description:
Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Have you ever asked yourself the following questions:
Why is American politics dominated by two parties?
How come electoral votes seem to matter more in presidential elections than individual votes?
How can America claim to be the country of "liberty and justice for all" when I hear and see stories about injustices and violations of individual freedoms?
How can I make my political voice heard when I am just one of 300 million citizens?
Why do we allow millions of illegal aliens into the United States every year when many legal U. S. residents are living in poverty?

If you have wondered about complicated questions like these, or if reading the questions above has generated a spark of intellectual curiosity, then you might want to consider signing up for this course.

This course is designed for motivated students who are interested in attaining a well-rounded perspective in American government. The course will provide students with an introductory look at the major aspects of government that every American citizen should know. Students will become familiar with the major institutions, groups, and political beliefs in the American governmental system. Course activities will include discussion groups, short papers, peer feedback, interactive website assignments, and student projects. While significant content will be included as part of this course, a major focus will be on stimulating an interest and passion in the subject of government, with the idea of becoming an educated and involved civic citizen in an increasingly complex world.

If you have actually read this far in the course description I feel obliged to provide you with the following warning, just in case you decide to take this class:

1) You are likely to have more fun than you thought possible in a government class!
2) Some of the issues covered in this course are controversial in nature, so be prepared to have your personal views challenged in the form of healthy, productive debates with your peers!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Janet Chandler
Poultney High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Government Honors Section MT: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Have you ever asked yourself the following questions:

Why is American politics dominated by two parties?
How come electoral votes seem to matter more in presidential elections than
individual votes?
How can America claim to be the country of "liberty and justice for all" when I hear
and see stories about injustices and violations of individual freedoms?
How can I make my political voice heard when I am just one of 300 million
citizens?
Why do we allow millions of illegal aliens into the United States every year when
many legal U. S. residents are living in poverty?

If you have wondered about complicated questions like these, or if reading the questions above has generated a spark of intellectual curiosity, then you might want to consider signing up for this course.

This course is designed for motivated students who are interested in attaining a well-rounded perspective in American government. The course will provide students with an introductory look at the major aspects of government that every American citizen should know. Students will become familiar with the major institutions, groups, and political beliefs in the American governmental system. Course activities will include discussion groups, short papers, peer feedback, interactive website assignments, and student projects. While significant content will be included as part of this course, a major focus will be on stimulating an interest and passion in the subject of government, with the idea of becoming an educated and involved civic citizen in an increasingly complex world.

If you have actually read this far in the course description I feel obliged to provide you with the following warning, just in case you decide to take this class:

1) You are likely to have more fun than you thought possible in a government class!
2) Some of the issues covered in this course are controversial in nature, so be prepared to have your personal views challenged in the form of healthy, productive debates with your peers!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Maura Tucker
Wilmington High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Government Honors Section MT: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Have you ever asked yourself the following questions:

Why is American politics dominated by two parties?
How come electoral votes seem to matter more in presidential elections than
individual votes?
How can America claim to be the country of "liberty and justice for all" when I hear
and see stories about injustices and violations of individual freedoms?
How can I make my political voice heard when I am just one of 300 million
citizens?
Why do we allow millions of illegal aliens into the United States every year when
many legal U. S. residents are living in poverty?

If you have wondered about complicated questions like these, or if reading the questions above has generated a spark of intellectual curiosity, then you might want to consider signing up for this course.

This course is designed for motivated students who are interested in attaining a well-rounded perspective in American government. The course will provide students with an introductory look at the major aspects of government that every American citizen should know. Students will become familiar with the major institutions, groups, and political beliefs in the American governmental system. Course activities will include discussion groups, short papers, peer feedback, interactive website assignments, and student projects. While significant content will be included as part of this course, a major focus will be on stimulating an interest and passion in the subject of government, with the idea of becoming an educated and involved civic citizen in an increasingly complex world.

If you have actually read this far in the course description I feel obliged to provide you with the following warning, just in case you decide to take this class:

1) You are likely to have more fun than you thought possible in a government class!
2) Some of the issues covered in this course are controversial in nature, so be prepared to have your personal views challenged in the form of healthy, productive debates with your peers!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Maura Tucker
Wilmington High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Government Summer Offering
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer School Extended Session
Prerequisites: None
Description: The Government Summer offering will provide students with an introductory look at the major aspects of government that every American citizen should know. Students will become familiar with the major institutions, groups, and political beliefs in the American governmental system. A major focus will be on stimulating an interest and passion in the subject of government, with the idea of becoming an educated and involved civic citizen in an increasingly complex world.

All class materials and assignments are online so you do not have to lug a heavy backpack, pencils, or books to class. The course is just a mouse click away.

Please note that because this course is eight weeks in duration, and students are expected to work approximately ten hours per week, the course will therefore not cover a full year's curriculum with the same depth that is covered in a year-long course. In addition, if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school.
Maura Tucker
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Health Summer Offering
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites:
Description: This course explores current topics in health and society and promotes awareness and use of techniques to develop a healthy lifestyle. Healthy eating, exercise, lifestyle choice, healthy relationships and a look at how the media influences self-esteem are all integral parts of the course material. Students will examine social health as it applies to their own peer groups and will cover basic anatomy as it applies to general physical health. Mental health will be covered by the examination of the popular media and its influence over perception of healthy behaviors and attitudes. Reproductive health issues will also be introduced. Students will also spend time completing assignments that ask them to evaluate their personal behavior in areas such as exercise, nutrition and peer groups through discussions and daily assignments. Students will develop a short term health plan related to each area of the health triangle (physical, social and mental).

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school.
Steven Perrin
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Heroes Section SH
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: May the force be with you! The preceding wish is more than just a catchy phrase from the 1970's. Luke Skywalker in The Star Wars Trilogy is one example of a memorable hero. Did you know Star Wars is deeply rooted in traditional literature? In this course students will explore the formula embedded in the hero's adventure: separation, initiation, and return. We will read a variety of literature from fairy tales to Anglo-Saxon epics to mythology, and we will view a few films. Students will compare and contrast the literature from various time periods and cultures and share their ideas with their classmates. Students will be encouraged to apply their insights to their own lives and communities, to search for modern-day heroes, and to report back to the group. Finally, students will write hero stories and share their adventures.Sara Hedges
Lancaster High School


* - - - *

Course Title: History and American Pop Music Section AR
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: No Media Kit is required, however the ability to download and playback mp3 files is essential for this course.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This course will examine the relationship between 20th Century History (current events, at the time) and the popular forms of music and the messages that music displayed. The course begins with a look at how popular culture (be it art, theatre, literature, or music) has been "historical" in the past, and will then pick up with the blues singers at the beginning of the 20th century. The course will proceed through each decade of the 20th century, examining music such as blues, jazz, rock, reggae, pop, metal, folk, country and rap. Students will examine lyrics and historical events, and analyze how lyrical content changed over time.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Amanda Roeder
Marblehead High School


* - - - *

Course Title: History and American Pop Music Section LF
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: No Media Kit is required, however the ability to download and playback mp3 files is essential for this course.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This course will examine the relationship between 20th Century History (current events, at the time) and the popular forms of music and the messages that music displayed. The course begins with a look at how popular culture (be it art, theatre, literature, or music) has been "historical" in the past, and will then pick up with the blues singers at the beginning of the 20th century. The course will proceed through each decade of the 20th century, examining music such as blues, jazz, rock, reggae, pop, metal, folk, country and rap. Students will examine lyrics and historical events, and analyze how lyrical content changed over time.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Laura Frye
Sharon High School


* - - - *

Course Title: History of Photography Section JC
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students do not have to have a camera or a darkroom, but they should have access to a scanner.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This course will explore the use of photography as a record of visual history - not just the use of photography for documentation, but also as a reflection of technological developments, social trends, and as a means of personal expression. Students will examine the works of famous photographers, from its beginnings in the 19th century to contemporary times, and will develop an aesthetic vocabulary. In addition, they will have opportunities to exchange ideas and explore subject matter through class discussion forums and team work. They will also create studio assignments in order to gain an appreciation for how photography can be used as a means of personal expression.James Coughlin
Archbishop Williams High School


* - - - *

Course Title: History of Photography Section JM
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students do not have to have a camera or a darkroom, but they should have access to a scanner.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This course will explore the use of photography as a record of visual history - not just the use of photography for documentation, but also as a reflection of technological developments, social trends, and as a means of personal expression. Students will examine the works of famous photographers, from its beginnings in the 19th century to contemporary times, and will develop an aesthetic vocabulary. In addition, they will have opportunities to exchange ideas and explore subject matter through class discussion forums and team work. They will also create studio assignments in order to gain an appreciation for how photography can be used as a means of personal expression.Julie Muellejans
Smith Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: History of Photography Section ST
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students do not have to have a camera or a darkroom, but they should have access to a scanner.
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This course will explore the use of photography as a record of visual history - not just the use of photography for documentation, but also as a reflection of technological developments, social trends, and as a means of personal expression. Students will examine the works of famous photographers, from its beginnings in the 19th century to contemporary times, and will develop an aesthetic vocabulary. In addition, they will have opportunities to exchange ideas and explore subject matter through class discussion forums and team work. They will also create studio assignments in order to gain an appreciation for how photography can be used as a means of personal expression.Sarah Taylor
Bigfork High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Honors English 9B Private Offering HHS Blue (T2)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Honors English 9B Private Offering HHS Blue (T2)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Libby Turpin
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Honors English 9B Private Offering HHS Red (T2)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Honors English 9B Private Offering HHS Red (T2)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Crystal Palace
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Honors English 9B Private Offering HHS Red (T2)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Jeff Ragland
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Honors English 9B Private Offering HHS Red (T2)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Libby Turpin
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Honors English 9B Private Offering HHS Yellow (T2)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Honors English 9B Private Offering HHS Yellow (T2)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Libby Turpin
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Honors English 9C Private Offering HHS Gray (T3)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Honors English 9C Private Offering HHS Gray (T3)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Libby Turpin
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Honors English 9C Private Offering HHS Pink (T3)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Honors English 9C Private Offering HHS Pink (T3)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Holly High School***

This course will concentrate on three areas of study: literature, language, and writing. Our study of literature will include short stories, poetry, non-fiction, novels, and drama. You will increase your language skills and polish your grammar skills with vocabulary lists and quizzes. These skills will go hand in hand with the writing lessons, as you work on improving your written communication.
· Literature: In semester one, we will concentrate on short fiction (including the short story and poetry) and short non-fiction. In semester two, we will enjoy a novel and a Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet).
· Language: In semester one, we will cover parts of speech and sentence elements and in semester two, mechanics of the language, phrases and clauses, and usage.
· Writing: We will be doing some creative writing in the first half of the year as well as an expository essay. In the spring, we'll do some persuasive writing and two projects.
Each week, students may have a reading often with an accompanying discussion, a vocabulary assignment, a writing assignment, and a grammar lesson and assignment. Individual projects/activities and group work will also be part of this class.Libby Turpin
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Horror Writers Section KD: Edgar Allan Poe and Stephen King
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students must obtain their own copy of the book and film of The Shining. Other materials will be accessed online.

Some of the readings and the film in this course may contain language that some persons may consider to be either profane and/or vulgar. Additionally, some persons may consider the themes of the various works to be either of a controversial or a mature nature.

Be advised that the film by Stanley Kubrick, The Shining , is MPAA Rated R due to its “mature themes” and “profane/vulgar language.” Students who are unable to procure The Shining will be given an alternative assignment.


Description: Are you a loyal fan of Edgar Allan Poe? Enjoy being scared by Stephen King?

Have you wondered if Poe's raven is actually a demonic, supernatural being with a message of eternal punishment or merely a lost pet, trained to say a single word?

Have you found that both these author's stories and poetry, along with mystery and horror, contain deep, underlying feelings of pathos, misery, and depression that seem to resonate within this “modern” world?

Are you fascinated with King's imagination and writing style?

Have you read several of their works that made you want to read more?

If so, this course is definitely for you.

Although Poe died over 150 years ago, he continues to inspire strong feelings, both in his admirers and in his critics, just as he did in the latter half of the nineteenth and early years of the twentieth centuries. Although he is most famous for his horror stories, Poe has influenced many writers such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Ray Bradbury, and especially Stephen King.

Inventor of the murder mystery, innovator of the science fiction genre, master of gothic tales of horror, and literary critic, Poe commands a significant position in literature, not only in the United States but also throughout the world.

Stephen King is the modern master of gothic horror. He is such a prolific writer than fans don't have a long wait for newly published work. While both writers have an obsession with death, grief, mystery, and gloom, they are unique in their writing styles.

In this course, you will read, research, analyze, and discuss specific works by Poe and King and their literary techniques. Throughout the course, you will compare King's work to Poe's stories.

Specifically, students will:
1. write their own gothic story
2. participate in discussions and travel online to Poe's burial site to learn more about Poe
and the mysteries that surround him and King
3. compare the two writers
4 research a variety of author-related web sites and gather information from articles and
essays
5. work with other students collaboratively in wikis and blogs
6. participate in small and whole class group activities


By the end of the class, you should be able to appreciate more clearly why so many readers are devoutly addicted to Poe and King. Their influence cannot be overestimated.

Join us as we enter the realm of gothic horror!
Karin Deyo
Berkshire Hills Regional School District Collaborative


* - - - *

Course Title: Horror Writers Section RB: Edgar Allan Poe and Stephen King
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students must obtain their own copy of the book and film of The Shining. Other materials will be accessed online.

Some of the readings and the film in this course may contain language that some persons may consider to be either profane and/or vulgar. Additionally, some persons may consider the themes of the various works to be either of a controversial or a mature nature.

Be advised that the film by Stanley Kubrick, The Shining , is MPAA Rated R due to its “mature themes” and “profane/vulgar language.” Students who are unable to procure The Shining will be given an alternative assignment.
Description: Are you a loyal fan of Edgar Allan Poe? Enjoy being scared by Stephen King?

Have you wondered if Poe's raven is actually a demonic, supernatural being with a message of eternal punishment or merely a lost pet, trained to say a single word?

Have you found that both these author's stories and poetry, along with mystery and horror, contain deep, underlying feelings of pathos, misery, and depression that seem to resonate within this “modern” world?

Are you fascinated with King's imagination and writing style?

Have you read several of their works that made you want to read more?

If so, this course is definitely for you.

Although Poe died over 150 years ago, he continues to inspire strong feelings, both in his admirers and in his critics, just as he did in the latter half of the nineteenth and early years of the twentieth centuries. Although he is most famous for his horror stories, Poe has influenced many writers such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Ray Bradbury, and especially Stephen King.

Inventor of the murder mystery, innovator of the science fiction genre, master of gothic tales of horror, and literary critic, Poe commands a significant position in literature, not only in the United States but also throughout the world.

Stephen King is the modern master of gothic horror. He is such a prolific writer than fans don't have a long wait for newly published work. While both writers have an obsession with death, grief, mystery, and gloom, they are unique in their writing styles.

In this course, you will read, research, analyze, and discuss specific works by Poe and King and their literary techniques. Throughout the course, you will compare King's work to Poe's stories.

Specifically, students will:
1. write their own gothic story
2. participate in discussions and travel online to Poe's burial site to learn more about Poe
and the mysteries that surround him and King
3. compare the two writers
4 research a variety of author-related web sites and gather information from articles and
essays
5. work with other students collaboratively in wikis and blogs
6. participate in small and whole class group activities


By the end of the class, you should be able to appreciate more clearly why so many readers are devoutly addicted to Poe and King. Their influence cannot be overestimated.

Join us as we enter the realm of gothic horror!
Rick Bagby
Fairfield County ESC


* - - - *

Course Title: International Business Section BK
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic Word Processing and Internet Skills
Description: Are you interested in your future? If so, you will benefit greatly by enrolling in this course. International Business is designed to help you develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace.

Do you enjoy learning, exploring, and having fun? If so, International Business may be the course for you! International Business is an ever-changing, interesting field that affects everyone across the entire globe. It ultimately affects you and your future! Consumers buy products made in countries all around the world. Workers find changing employment opportunities due to international trade and global competition. Companies compete with firms from other countries for the money spent by consumers. As U.S. companies increase International Business activities, our roles as consumers, workers, and citizens expand.

What will you learn in this course? This course will provide the foundation for becoming well informed about International Business. It gives you an introduction to international business activities and the economic, cultural, and political factors that affect International Business. Business structure and management, trade, global entrepreneurship, marketing, and career planning will be studied. Throughout the course you will use your creativity as well as your new International Business skills to develop the framework for a fictitious company that sells its products around the world.. International Business is an INTERESTING course. It will affect your future by helping you to become a more informed consumer, worker, and citizen.Beth Keezer
Kennebunk High School


* - - - *

Course Title: International Business Section FD
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic Word Processing and Internet Skills
Description: Are you interested in your future? If so, you will benefit greatly by enrolling in this course. International Business is designed to help you develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace.

Do you enjoy learning, exploring, and having fun? If so, International Business may be the course for you! International Business is an ever-changing, interesting field that affects everyone across the entire globe. It ultimately affects you and your future! Consumers buy products made in countries all around the world. Workers find changing employment opportunities due to international trade and global competition. Companies compete with firms from other countries for the money spent by consumers. As U.S. companies increase International Business activities, our roles as consumers, workers, and citizens expand.

What will you learn in this course? This course will provide the foundation for becoming well informed about International Business. It gives you an introduction to international business activities and the economic, cultural, and political factors that affect International Business. Business structure and management, trade, global entrepreneurship, marketing, and career planning will be studied. Throughout the course you will use your creativity as well as your new International Business skills to develop the framework for a fictitious company that sells its products around the world.. International Business is an INTERESTING course. It will affect your future by helping you to become a more informed consumer, worker, and citizen.Florina Merturi
Academy of Information Technology and Engineering


* - - - *

Course Title: International Business Section HR
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic Word Processing and Internet Skills
Description: Are you interested in your future? If so, you will benefit greatly by enrolling in this course. International Business is designed to help you develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace.

Do you enjoy learning, exploring, and having fun? If so, International Business may be the course for you! International Business is an ever-changing, interesting field that affects everyone across the entire globe. It ultimately affects you and your future! Consumers buy products made in countries all around the world. Workers find changing employment opportunities due to international trade and global competition. Companies compete with firms from other countries for the money spent by consumers. As U.S. companies increase International Business activities, our roles as consumers, workers, and citizens expand.

What will you learn in this course? This course will provide the foundation for becoming well informed about International Business. It gives you an introduction to international business activities and the economic, cultural, and political factors that affect International Business. Business structure and management, trade, global entrepreneurship, marketing, and career planning will be studied. Throughout the course you will use your creativity as well as your new International Business skills to develop the framework for a fictitious company that sells its products around the world.. International Business is an INTERESTING course. It will affect your future by helping you to become a more informed consumer, worker, and citizen.Holly Ruiz
Bethel High School


* - - - *

Course Title: International Business Section SH
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic Word Processing and Internet Skills
Description: Are you interested in your future? If so, you will benefit greatly by enrolling in this course. International Business is designed to help you develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace.

Do you enjoy learning, exploring, and having fun? If so, International Business may be the course for you! International Business is an ever-changing, interesting field that affects everyone across the entire globe. It ultimately affects you and your future! Consumers buy products made in countries all around the world. Workers find changing employment opportunities due to international trade and global competition. Companies compete with firms from other countries for the money spent by consumers. As U.S. companies increase International Business activities, our roles as consumers, workers, and citizens expand.

What will you learn in this course? This course will provide the foundation for becoming well informed about International Business. It gives you an introduction to international business activities and the economic, cultural, and political factors that affect International Business. Business structure and management, trade, global entrepreneurship, marketing, and career planning will be studied. Throughout the course you will use your creativity as well as your new International Business skills to develop the framework for a fictitious company that sells its products around the world.. International Business is an INTERESTING course. It will affect your future by helping you to become a more informed consumer, worker, and citizen.Steven Haddad
Murdock Middle/High School


* - - - *

Course Title: International Business Section TD
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic Word Processing and Internet Skills
Description: Are you interested in your future? If so, you will benefit greatly by enrolling in this course. International Business is designed to help you develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in a global marketplace.

Do you enjoy learning, exploring, and having fun? If so, International Business may be the course for you! International Business is an ever-changing, interesting field that affects everyone across the entire globe. It ultimately affects you and your future! Consumers buy products made in countries all around the world. Workers find changing employment opportunities due to international trade and global competition. Companies compete with firms from other countries for the money spent by consumers. As U.S. companies increase International Business activities, our roles as consumers, workers, and citizens expand.

What will you learn in this course? This course will provide the foundation for becoming well informed about International Business. It gives you an introduction to international business activities and the economic, cultural, and political factors that affect International Business. Business structure and management, trade, global entrepreneurship, marketing, and career planning will be studied. Throughout the course you will use your creativity as well as your new International Business skills to develop the framework for a fictitious company that sells its products around the world.. International Business is an INTERESTING course. It will affect your future by helping you to become a more informed consumer, worker, and citizen.Tamie-Jo Dickinson
Champlain Valley Union High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Investing in the Stock Market Section AG
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description:
"Buy low, Sell high!!". . . probably the best piece of investment advice ever given! Learn how to make sense (and dollars!) out of everything Wall Street has to offer!

This course will analyze the stock market's history, current trends, and future possibilities. Students will participate in a realistic stock market simulation in which each student has $1 million to invest. The game will continue throughout the duration of the course during which the following topics will be addressed: reading and understanding stock quotes, the Dow and other indexes, online investing and company research, bull and bear markets, factors affecting stock price, risk management, P/E ratios, dividends, earnings per share, stock splits, trading, investment plans, and annual reports (balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements). Students will be graded on weekly stock reports showing their profit/loss on their investment portfolio using a spreadsheet that includes graphs, a time-line showing the history of the stock market, a PowerPoint presentation outlining their investment decisions and company research during the stock market game, weekly discussions/essays focusing on the current weekly happenings in the stock market, a monthly newsletter highlighting current company news of companies invested in, and various tests and quizzes.

**Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Learning to Invest in the Stock Market" should not take this course.Anne Galeski
Clinton High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Investing in the Stock Market Section DM
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description:
"Buy low, Sell high!!". . . probably the best piece of investment advice ever given! Learn how to make sense (and dollars!) out of everything Wall Street has to offer!

This course will analyze the stock market's history, current trends, and future possibilities. Students will participate in a realistic stock market simulation in which each student has $1 million to invest. The game will continue throughout the duration of the course during which the following topics will be addressed: reading and understanding stock quotes, the Dow and other indexes, online investing and company research, bull and bear markets, factors affecting stock price, risk management, P/E ratios, dividends, earnings per share, stock splits, trading, investment plans, and annual reports (balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements). Students will be graded on weekly stock reports showing their profit/loss on their investment portfolio using a spreadsheet that includes graphs, a time-line showing the history of the stock market, a PowerPoint presentation outlining their investment decisions and company research during the stock market game, weekly discussions/essays focusing on the current weekly happenings in the stock market, a monthly newsletter highlighting current company news of companies invested in, and various tests and quizzes.

**Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Learning to Invest in the Stock Market" should not take this course.Dorothy Maxwell
Sacopee Valley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Investing in the Stock Market Section DR
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: "Buy low, Sell high!!". . . probably the best piece of investment advice ever given! Learn how to make sense (and dollars!) out of everything Wall Street has to offer!

This course will analyze the stock market's history, current trends, and future possibilities. Students will participate in a realistic stock market simulation in which each student has $1 million to invest. The game will continue throughout the duration of the course during which the following topics will be addressed: reading and understanding stock quotes, the Dow and other indexes, online investing and company research, bull and bear markets, factors affecting stock price, risk management, P/E ratios, dividends, earnings per share, stock splits, trading, investment plans, and annual reports (balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements). Students will be graded on weekly stock reports showing their profit/loss on their investment portfolio using a spreadsheet that includes graphs, a time-line showing the history of the stock market, a PowerPoint presentation outlining their investment decisions and company research during the stock market game, weekly discussions/essays focusing on the current weekly happenings in the stock market, a monthly newsletter highlighting current company news of companies invested in, and various tests and quizzes.

**Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Learning to Invest in the Stock Market" should not take this course.David Reynolds
Middletown CT High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Italian Language and Culture Section EA
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An open mind and excitement to learn about a different culture, country, and way of life. The course is taught in English. It is designed for students whose English language skills are very strong. This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge of Italian is required.

Technology requirements: Students will need access to Power Point, Voice Thread and RealPlayer, as well as Internet, including YouTube website. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format.

Description: In the center of the Mediterranean sea sits a small peninsula. This peninsula has inspired Empires, masterpieces, and an expressive passionate culture. In this land you can find a city on the water, Islands with blue waters and black sands, expansive mountain ranges and bustling ports. The language is meant to be sung having its origins with the Romans and the Etruscans.

The Italian people are passionate, expressive, and creative. Through history they have contributed to art and new thinking. During this course you will feel more deeply the language as you learn the about the people who speak it. You will study their history, their interests and pastimes.

In this course you will navigate with your virtual gondola through Italy’s topography, history and culture. You will learn simple expressions to help introduce yourself, talk about your likes and dislikes, family, order food, haggle with the open market vendors, take a train, and shop. Discover the beauty of Italian cities through video. Listen to Italian nursery rhymes and pop music as you cook up a special Italian dish.

The course’s main objective is to inspire you to continue to learn the language and to one day experience the country for yourself.Elizabeth Adair
Hammonton High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Italian Language and Culture Section GG
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An open mind and excitement to learn about a different culture, country, and way of life. The course is taught in English. It is designed for students whose English language skills are very strong. This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge of Italian is required.

Technology requirements: Students will need access to Power Point, Voice Thread and RealPlayer, as well as Internet, including YouTube website. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format.

Description: In the center of the Mediterranean sea sits a small peninsula. This peninsula has inspired Empires, masterpieces, and an expressive passionate culture. In this land you can find a city on the water, Islands with blue waters and black sands, expansive mountain ranges and bustling ports. The language is meant to be sung having its origins with the Romans and the Etruscans.

The Italian people are passionate, expressive, and creative. Through history they have contributed to art and new thinking. During this course you will feel more deeply the language as you learn the about the people who speak it. You will study their history, their interests and pastimes.

In this course you will navigate with your virtual gondola through Italy’s topography, history and culture. You will learn simple expressions to help introduce yourself, talk about your likes and dislikes, family, order food, haggle with the open market vendors, take a train, and shop. Discover the beauty of Italian cities through video. Listen to Italian nursery rhymes and pop music as you cook up a special Italian dish.

The course’s main objective is to inspire you to continue to learn the language and to one day experience the country for yourself.Graziella Giampaoli
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Italian Language and Culture Section GG2
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: An open mind and excitement to learn about a different culture, country, and way of life. The course is taught in English. It is designed for students whose English language skills are very strong. This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge of Italian is required.

Technology requirements: Students will need access to Power Point, Voice Thread and RealPlayer, as well as Internet, including YouTube website. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format.

Description: In the center of the Mediterranean sea sits a small peninsula. This peninsula has inspired Empires, masterpieces, and an expressive passionate culture. In this land you can find a city on the water, Islands with blue waters and black sands, expansive mountain ranges and bustling ports. The language is meant to be sung having its origins with the Romans and the Etruscans.

The Italian people are passionate, expressive, and creative. Through history they have contributed to art and new thinking. During this course you will feel more deeply the language as you learn the about the people who speak it. You will study their history, their interests and pastimes.

In this course you will navigate with your virtual gondola through Italy’s topography, history and culture. You will learn simple expressions to help introduce yourself, talk about your likes and dislikes, family, order food, haggle with the open market vendors, take a train, and shop. Discover the beauty of Italian cities through video. Listen to Italian nursery rhymes and pop music as you cook up a special Italian dish.

The course’s main objective is to inspire you to continue to learn the language and to one day experience the country for yourself.Graziella Giampaoli
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Journalism in the Digital Age Section GD
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Online resources. Software needed includes Adobe Reader, Flash Player 8 or higher, Windows Media Player, QuickTime or other media player. Windows Movie Maker or Apple iMovie is needed; online alternatives are available. Links to online readings and other resources will be provided. Students also need access to a still or video digital camera and plug-in microphone for a computer. Access to an MP3 recorder would be helpful.
Description: Life is an ever-changing collection of stories, and Journalism in the Digital Age helps you find and tell the stories that make up today’s world using technology that captivates audiences. Compelling topics, strong writing, engaging visual design, and multimedia all come to life as you write about anything from local bands, interesting people, to life in your community for an online magazine-format blog. You will have steady opportunities to identify and produce your own stories, conduct interviews, and enhance your work through multimedia, including photography and short video. No prior experience in media production is necessary. You will also work collaboratively to provide feedback to colleagues as well as analyze the productions of a number of today’s top news, sports, and feature journalists. In addition to sharing your perspective on the world through the course e-magazine, your work will form the basis of a digital portfolio of writing and multimedia.Gaunet Davis
Metropolitan Learning Center


* - - - *,
Course Title: Journalism in the Digital Age Section GD
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Online resources. Software needed includes Adobe Reader, Flash Player 8 or higher, Windows Media Player, QuickTime or other media player. Windows Movie Maker or Apple iMovie is needed; online alternatives are available. Links to online readings and other resources will be provided. Students also need access to a still or video digital camera and plug-in microphone for a computer. Access to an MP3 recorder would be helpful.
Description: Life is an ever-changing collection of stories, and Journalism in the Digital Age helps you find and tell the stories that make up today’s world using technology that captivates audiences. Compelling topics, strong writing, engaging visual design, and multimedia all come to life as you write about anything from local bands, interesting people, to life in your community for an online magazine-format blog. You will have steady opportunities to identify and produce your own stories, conduct interviews, and enhance your work through multimedia, including photography and short video. No prior experience in media production is necessary. You will also work collaboratively to provide feedback to colleagues as well as analyze the productions of a number of today’s top news, sports, and feature journalists. In addition to sharing your perspective on the world through the course e-magazine, your work will form the basis of a digital portfolio of writing and multimedia.Gaunet Davis
Metropolitan Learning Center


* - - - *

Course Title: Journalism in the Digital Age Section SG
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Online resources. Software needed includes Adobe Reader, Flash Player 8 or higher, Windows Media Player, QuickTime or other media player. Windows Movie Maker or Apple iMovie would be helpful; online alternatives are available. Links to online readings and other resources will be provided. Students would also benefit by access to a still or video digital camera, plug-in microphone for a computer, or MP3 recorder.
Description: Life is an ever-changing collection of stories, and Journalism in the Digital Age helps you find and tell the stories that make up today’s world using technology that captivates audiences. Compelling topics, strong writing, engaging visual design, and multimedia all come to life as you write about anything from local bands, interesting people, to life in your community for an online magazine-format weblog. You will have steady opportunities to identify and produce your own stories, conduct interviews, and enhance your work through multimedia, including photography and short video. No prior experience in media production is necessary. You will also work collaboratively to provide feedback to colleagues as well as analyze the productions of a number of today’s top news, sports, and feature journalists. In addition to sharing your perspective on the world through the course e-magazine, your work will form the basis of a digital portfolio of writing and multimedia.
Sherri Gosson
Somerset-Berkley Regional High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Journalism in the Digital Age Section SG
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Online resources. Software needed includes Adobe Reader, Flash Player 8 or higher, Windows Media Player, QuickTime or other media player. Windows Movie Maker or Apple iMovie would be helpful; online alternatives are available. Links to online readings and other resources will be provided. Students would also benefit by access to a still or video digital camera, plug-in microphone for a computer, or MP3 recorder.
Description: Life is an ever-changing collection of stories, and Journalism in the Digital Age helps you find and tell the stories that make up today’s world using technology that captivates audiences. Compelling topics, strong writing, engaging visual design, and multimedia all come to life as you write about anything from local bands, interesting people, to life in your community for an online magazine-format weblog. You will have steady opportunities to identify and produce your own stories, conduct interviews, and enhance your work through multimedia, including photography and short video. No prior experience in media production is necessary. You will also work collaboratively to provide feedback to colleagues as well as analyze the productions of a number of today’s top news, sports, and feature journalists. In addition to sharing your perspective on the world through the course e-magazine, your work will form the basis of a digital portfolio of writing and multimedia.
Sherri Gosson
Somerset-Berkley Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Journalism in the Digital Age Section VK
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Online resources. Software needed includes Adobe Reader, Flash Player 8 or higher, Windows Media Player, QuickTime or other media player. Windows Movie Maker or Apple iMovie is needed; online alternatives are available. Links to online readings and other resources will be provided. Students also need access to a still or video digital camera and plug-in microphone for a computer. Access to an MP3 recorder would be helpful.
Description: Life is an ever-changing collection of stories, and Journalism in the Digital Age helps you find and tell the stories that make up today’s world using technology that captivates audiences. Compelling topics, strong writing, engaging visual design, and multimedia all come to life as you write about anything from local bands, interesting people, to life in your community for an online magazine-format blog. You will have steady opportunities to identify and produce your own stories, conduct interviews, and enhance your work through multimedia, including photography and short video. No prior experience in media production is necessary. You will also work collaboratively to provide feedback to colleagues as well as analyze the productions of a number of today’s top news, sports, and feature journalists. In addition to sharing your perspective on the world through the course e-magazine, your work will form the basis of a digital portfolio of writing and multimedia.Valerie Kibler
Harrisonburg High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Journalism in the Digital Age Section VK
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Online resources. Software needed includes Adobe Reader, Flash Player 8 or higher, Windows Media Player, QuickTime or other media player. Windows Movie Maker or Apple iMovie is needed; online alternatives are available. Links to online readings and other resources will be provided. Students also need access to a still or video digital camera and plug-in microphone for a computer. Access to an MP3 recorder would be helpful.
Description: Life is an ever-changing collection of stories, and Journalism in the Digital Age helps you find and tell the stories that make up today’s world using technology that captivates audiences. Compelling topics, strong writing, engaging visual design, and multimedia all come to life as you write about anything from local bands, interesting people, to life in your community for an online magazine-format blog. You will have steady opportunities to identify and produce your own stories, conduct interviews, and enhance your work through multimedia, including photography and short video. No prior experience in media production is necessary. You will also work collaboratively to provide feedback to colleagues as well as analyze the productions of a number of today’s top news, sports, and feature journalists. In addition to sharing your perspective on the world through the course e-magazine, your work will form the basis of a digital portfolio of writing and multimedia.Valerie Kibler
Harrisonburg High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher Section AM
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: A love of children and a desire to feel good about yourself. New skills that are essential for success will be developed as an integral part of the course.
Description: Do you think becoming a teacher is in your future? Would you like to work with young children as a teacher’s helper? Do you want to know how you can become your child’s first and best teacher? If you can answer “yes” to any of these questions, Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher is the course for you.
Taking Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher will help you become knowledgeable about learning styles, characteristics of young learners, lesson planning and teaching techniques. As the course progresses, you will observe one period and teach five pre-planned lessons in a kindergarten classroom.
It is essential that you, as a student, contact and contract with a kindergarten teacher that is receptive to your presence in the class and that you are able to travel to the elementary school for 30-45 minutes one day a week for 6 weeks to observe and present your lessons. These classroom visits usually begin the fifth week of class.
During Term 2, you will observe for one VHS period in a pre-kindergarten classroom and for another VHS period in a first grade classroom. These visits will give you the opportunity to observe how the school curriculum begins in the pre-kindergarten classroom and spirals through the kindergarten and first grade classroom building on and expanding the skills taught the previous years. These contacts and observations usually occur during Weeks 10 and 11. Your Site Coordinator will be able to help you with both the kindergarten classroom arrangements and the Pre-K/First Grade classroom arrangements.
Each student will be evaluated on weekly contributions to discussions, reading assignments, written lesson plans and delivery, as well as a variety of other experiences and assignments related to understanding the cognitive processes inherent in young children. Each of you will also come away from this experience with a new appreciation for the happy, loving outlook that kindergarten students have for their world and all the people in their world, including you.Ann Massey
Walsingham Academy Upper School


* - - - *

Course Title: Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher Section DK
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: A love of children and a desire to feel good about yourself. New skills that are essential for success will be developed as an integral part of the course.
Description: Do you think becoming a teacher is in your future? Would you like to work with young children as a teacher’s helper? Do you want to know how you can become your child’s first and best teacher? If you can answer “yes” to any of these questions, Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher is the course for you.
Taking Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher will help you become knowledgeable about learning styles, characteristics of young learners, lesson planning and teaching techniques. As the course progresses, you will observe one period and teach five pre-planned lessons in a kindergarten classroom.
It is essential that you, as a student, contact and contract with a kindergarten teacher that is receptive to your presence in the class and that you are able to travel to the elementary school for 30-45 minutes one day a week for 6 weeks to observe and present your lessons. These classroom visits usually begin the fifth week of class.
During Term 2, you will observe for one VHS period in a pre-kindergarten classroom and for another VHS period in a first grade classroom. These visits will give you the opportunity to observe how the school curriculum begins in the pre-kindergarten classroom and spirals through the kindergarten and first grade classroom building on and expanding the skills taught the previous years. These contacts and observations usually occur during Weeks 10 and 11. Your Site Coordinator will be able to help you with both the kindergarten classroom arrangements and the Pre-K/First Grade classroom arrangements.
Each student will be evaluated on weekly contributions to discussions, reading assignments, written lesson plans and delivery, as well as a variety of other experiences and assignments related to understanding the cognitive processes inherent in young children. Each of you will also come away from this experience with a new appreciation for the happy, loving outlook that kindergarten students have for their world and all the people in their world, including you.Daniel Kafalas
Woonsocket High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher Section JP
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: A love of children and a desire to feel good about yourself. New skills that are essential for success will be developed as an integral part of the course.
Description: Do you think becoming a teacher is in your future? Would you like to work with young children as a teacher’s helper? Do you want to know how you can become your child’s first and best teacher? If you can answer “yes” to any of these questions, Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher is the course for you.
Taking Kindergarten Apprentice Teacher will help you become knowledgeable about learning styles, characteristics of young learners, lesson planning and teaching techniques. As the course progresses, you will observe one period and teach five pre-planned lessons in a kindergarten classroom.
It is essential that you, as a student, contact and contract with a kindergarten teacher that is receptive to your presence in the class and that you are able to travel to the elementary school for 30-45 minutes one day a week for 6 weeks to observe and present your lessons. These classroom visits usually begin the fifth week of class.
During Term 2, you will observe for one VHS period in a pre-kindergarten classroom and for another VHS period in a first grade classroom. These visits will give you the opportunity to observe how the school curriculum begins in the pre-kindergarten classroom and spirals through the kindergarten and first grade classroom building on and expanding the skills taught the previous years. These contacts and observations usually occur during Weeks 10 and 11. Your Site Coordinator will be able to help you with both the kindergarten classroom arrangements and the Pre-K/First Grade classroom arrangements.
Each student will be evaluated on weekly contributions to discussions, reading assignments, written lesson plans and delivery, as well as a variety of other experiences and assignments related to understanding the cognitive processes inherent in young children. Each of you will also come away from this experience with a new appreciation for the happy, loving outlook that kindergarten students have for their world and all the people in their world, including you.Jamie Patchel
Palmyra High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 1 Private Offering
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Sports and Medical Sciences Academy**

There are two primary goals of Latin 1. On the one hand, Latin 1 focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary acquisition, and the grammar of the simple Latin sentence, so that the successful student will gain a rudimentary ability to comprehend Latin. On the other hand, Latin 1 enables the successful student to better understand and use English or other languages. A secondary goal is to introduce the student to Roman history and culture, which so heavily influence our own. Benjamin Johnson
Sports and Medical Sciences Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 1 Section CW
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description:
There are two primary goals of Latin 1. On the one hand, Latin 1 focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary acquisition, and the grammar of the simple Latin sentence, so that the successful student will gain a rudimentary ability to comprehend Latin. On the other hand, Latin 1 enables the successful student to better understand and use English or other languages. A secondary goal is to introduce the student to Roman history and culture, which so heavily influence our own. Charles Witte
Collingswood High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 1 Section GS
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description:
There are two primary goals of Latin 1. On the one hand, Latin 1 focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary acquisition, and the grammar of the simple Latin sentence, so that the successful student will gain a rudimentary ability to comprehend Latin. On the other hand, Latin 1 enables the successful student to better understand and use English or other languages. A secondary goal is to introduce the student to Roman history and culture, which so heavily influence our own. Gregory Starikovsky
Ramsey High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 1 Section LH
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description:
There are two primary goals of Latin 1. On the one hand, Latin 1 focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary acquisition, and the grammar of the simple Latin sentence, so that the successful student will gain a rudimentary ability to comprehend Latin. On the other hand, Latin 1 enables the successful student to better understand and use English or other languages. A secondary goal is to introduce the student to Roman history and culture, which so heavily influence our own. Laura Higley
Pequannock Township High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 1 Section LH2
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description:
There are two primary goals of Latin 1. On the one hand, Latin 1 focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary acquisition, and the grammar of the simple Latin sentence, so that the successful student will gain a rudimentary ability to comprehend Latin. On the other hand, Latin 1 enables the successful student to better understand and use English or other languages. A secondary goal is to introduce the student to Roman history and culture, which so heavily influence our own. Laura Higley
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 1 Section NG
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description:
There are two primary goals of Latin 1. On the one hand, Latin 1 focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary acquisition, and the grammar of the simple Latin sentence, so that the successful student will gain a rudimentary ability to comprehend Latin. On the other hand, Latin 1 enables the successful student to better understand and use English or other languages. A secondary goal is to introduce the student to Roman history and culture, which so heavily influence our own. Norma Glennon
Catherine McAuley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 1 Section TN
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description:
There are two primary goals of Latin 1. On the one hand, Latin 1 focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary acquisition, and the grammar of the simple Latin sentence, so that the successful student will gain a rudimentary ability to comprehend Latin. On the other hand, Latin 1 enables the successful student to better understand and use English or other languages. A secondary goal is to introduce the student to Roman history and culture, which so heavily influence our own. Tyler Nye
Avon High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 2 Section LH
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Latin 1
Description: Latin II is a reading based exploration of Latin grammar. Students will read stories about three major heroes while learning the remaining grammar points from Latin I. Students are expected to have completed a Latin I course and to know the following grammar points: the five declensions; the six tenses in the active voice for the four conjugations and irregular verbs; first, second and third declension adjectives and adverbs; and the demonstrative pronouns hic, ille, and is. The three main goals for the course are: learning the grammar of Latin II, learning the vocabulary of Latin II, and continuing to explore the culture and history of the Romans through research, projects, and discussions. The first two goals will enable you to read complex Latin stories, which will use such Latin grammar points as participles, the passive voice, comparative and superlative adjectives, and the subjunctive mood. The third goal will further your pursuit of the amazing world of the Romans and its impact on our world today. Laura Higley
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Latin 2 Section SR
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: Latin 1
Description: Latin II is a reading based exploration of Latin grammar. Students will read stories about three major heroes while learning the remaining grammar points from Latin I. Students are expected to have completed a Latin I course and to know the following grammar points: the five declensions; the six tenses in the active voice for the four conjugations and irregular verbs; first, second and third declension adjectives and adverbs; and the demonstrative pronouns hic, ille, and is. The three main goals for the course are: learning the grammar of Latin II, learning the vocabulary of Latin II, and continuing to explore the culture and history of the Romans through research, projects, and discussions. The first two goals will enable you to read complex Latin stories, which will use such Latin grammar points as participles, the passive voice, comparative and superlative adjectives, and the subjunctive mood. The third goal will further your pursuit of the amazing world of the Romans and its impact on our world today. Sheila Richmond
New Fairfield High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Learning to Invest in the Stock Market Section LP
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Learn how to invest - in the stock market and in your future!
Learn about the history of stocks, how the stock market works today and trends as we head into the next millennium. Learn investment and economic vocabulary.
Buy low, sell high!
What is a portfolio? What is a mutual fund? What is a bond? What is a CD? ( not the musical type)
Are you a risk taker or are you more conservative?
Learn how to set goals for yourself, plan a budget and choose the right investment strategy to meet those goals.
Pay yourself first. Be an owner, not a loaner. Experience the power of compounding!

Students will work in small groups to play the Stock Market Game Worldwide, an online investing simulation.
Each team will be given $100,000 to invest for ten weeks. They will choose, research and track companies. They will compete with other high school teams to see how much profit they can make. Students will track and graph their investments. Students will learn basic economics and investment strategies and apply them. Students will discuss and analyze current events to predict how they may or may not effect their investments. Students will share their investment experiences with other class members via an online presentation at the end of the course.

Grading will be on a monetary basis.
Students will be given weekly learning activities, current events readings, discussion topics and quizzes, along with participating in their Stock Market Game teams. They will earn fictional dollars as wages for their efforts. "Paychecks" will be deposited into a bank account and compounding interest will be earned. This system will enhance the concepts of annuities, time value of money, and compounding. At the end of the semester, students will "purchase" a final grade with their net earnings (after taxes).


**Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Investing in the Stock Market" should not take this course.Lynne Pelto
West Boylston Middle/High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Lewis and Clark's Expedition Section SM
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Writing skills and ability to locate websites on the Internet
Description: Wanted: Students willing to travel back in time to cover the Lewis and Clark expedition for CNN. Must be willing to face hunger, wild animals and extremely cold temperatures. Curiosity, good writing skills and sense of adventure a must.

Students in this class will participate in the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804-1806, which charted the Louisiana Territory (our current Upper Midwest and Northwest) acquired by the United States from France. After examining the legends of the Northwest Passage as well as the Virginia and Philadelphia roots of the expedition, we will shove off from St. Louis and travel up the Missouri River to spend our first frigid winter in the Indian village of Fort Mandan. We will then continue our journey west to the headwaters of the Missouri, portage over the rugged Bitterroot Mountains and cruise westward to the Pacific. After spending a soggy winter in Washington state, we will return home, chronicling the scientific and geographic discoveries that made the Lewis and Clark expedition one of the most famous explorations of all time.

During the electronic part of our journey, students will be transported back to 1804 by their assignment editor (their teacher) to cover the trip for CNN. Every week, they will report back on some aspect of the trip (news, feature, photo), which will be broadcast on the VHS affiliate of CNN. As editor, the instructor will provide them with leads (current L&C web sites), which will be used to help them complete their assignments.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented 8th grade students that meet all course prerequisites.*Sarah Mclellan
Cumberland Public Schools


* - - - *

Course Title: Literacy Skills for the 21st Century Private Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: ** This is a private offering for students from Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy**
Description:
What does it mean to be literate in the 21st Century?
This is the essential question we will ponder through the journey of this course.

o Do you love to write?
o Do your grammar skills need work?
o What exactly will you need to know how to do in your life after high school?
o Would you benefit from participation in a weekly writers’ workshop?
o Would you enjoy refining your skills by reading and discussing short stories and poems written by a culturally/regionally diverse selection of literary geniuses?

This may be the course for you!

This is a core English class. Its purpose is to teach literacy skills necessary for survival in the 21st Century. We will do so by use of basic grammar exercises, composition of three essays, and fascinating literary discussions. Lessons are inspired by UBD principles (Understanding By Design) and Washington State Standards.

Extra info for students:
Through our writing activities you will have an opportunity to become acquainted with your peers and identify how you use technology to communicate. (Do you have a cell phone, use any of the IM programs such as MSN Messenger, or use email?) For the persuasive essay you'll be asked to persuade your audience why or why not such programs and or tools are useful in your life. (Do you have a MySpace account? Are cell phones allowed at your school?) Express your views on these timely topics!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Joyce Wheeler
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Literacy Skills for the 21st Century Section ES
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: What does it mean to be literate in the 21st Century?
This is the essential question we will ponder through the journey of this course.

o Do you love to write?
o Do your grammar skills need work?
o What exactly will you need to know how to do in your life after high school?
o Would you benefit from participation in a weekly writers’ workshop?
o Would you enjoy refining your skills by reading and discussing short stories and poems written by a culturally/regionally diverse selection of literary geniuses?

This may be the course for you!

This is a core English class. Its purpose is to teach literacy skills necessary for survival in the 21st Century. We will do so by use of basic grammar exercises, composition of three essays, and fascinating literary discussions. Lessons are inspired by UBD principles (Understanding By Design) and Washington State Standards.

Extra info for students:
Through our writing activities you will have an opportunity to become acquainted with your peers and identify how you use technology to communicate. (Do you have a cell phone, use any of the IM programs such as MSN Messenger, or use email?) For the persuasive essay you'll be asked to persuade your audience why or why not such programs and or tools are useful in your life. (Do you have a MySpace account? Are cell phones allowed at your school?) Express your views on these timely topics!

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Elizabeth Sanchez
Forks High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Literacy Skills for the 21st Century Section KO Private Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for Cincinnati Prep students**

What does it mean to be literate in the 21st Century?
This is the essential question we will ponder through the journey of this course.

o Do you love to write?
o Do your grammar skills need work?
o What exactly will you need to know how to do in your life after high school?
o Would you benefit from participation in a weekly writers’ workshop?
o Would you enjoy refining your skills by reading and discussing short stories and poems written by a culturally/regionally diverse selection of literary geniuses?

This may be the course for you!

This is a core English class. Its purpose is to teach literacy skills necessary for survival in the 21st Century. We will do so by use of basic grammar exercises, composition of three essays, and fascinating literary discussions. Lessons are inspired by UBD principles (Understanding By Design) and Washington State Standards.

Extra info for students:
Through our writing activities you will have an opportunity to become acquainted with your peers and identify how you use technology to communicate. (Do you have a cell phone, use any of the IM programs such as MSN Messenger, or use email?) For the persuasive essay you'll be asked to persuade your audience why or why not such programs and or tools are useful in your life. (Do you have a MySpace account? Are cell phones allowed at your school?) Express your views on these timely topics!
Karen Orfitelli
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Literacy Skills for the 21st Century Section RK Private Offering
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for Cincinnati Prep students**

What does it mean to be literate in the 21st Century?
This is the essential question we will ponder through the journey of this course.

o Do you love to write?
o Do your grammar skills need work?
o What exactly will you need to know how to do in your life after high school?
o Would you benefit from participation in a weekly writers’ workshop?
o Would you enjoy refining your skills by reading and discussing short stories and poems written by a culturally/regionally diverse selection of literary geniuses?

This may be the course for you!

This is a core English class. Its purpose is to teach literacy skills necessary for survival in the 21st Century. We will do so by use of basic grammar exercises, composition of three essays, and fascinating literary discussions. Lessons are inspired by UBD principles (Understanding By Design) and Washington State Standards.

Extra info for students:
Through our writing activities you will have an opportunity to become acquainted with your peers and identify how you use technology to communicate. (Do you have a cell phone, use any of the IM programs such as MSN Messenger, or use email?) For the persuasive essay you'll be asked to persuade your audience why or why not such programs and or tools are useful in your life. (Do you have a MySpace account? Are cell phones allowed at your school?) Express your views on these timely topics!
Rosann Kozlowski
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Literature and Film II HHS Private Offering (T3)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: ** This is a private offering for Holly High School students **

Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Literature and Film II HHS Private Offering (T3)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: ** This is a private offering for Holly High School students **

Denise Elya
Holly High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Literature and Film II HHS Private Offering (T3)
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites:
Description: ** This is a private offering for Holly High School students **

Kimberly Wheeler
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Literature of the World Section JM: Human Rights and Global Perspectives
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Students *must* have strong skills in writing, reading, and literary analysis in order to succeed in this honors-level course. Basic word processing and internet search skills are required.
Description: Does the term “global citizen” intrigue you? Have you always desired to emerge yourself in the cultures and lifestyles of others around the globe? In Literature of the World: Human Rights and Global Perspectives, students will utilize a variety of resources from fiction, news articles, first-hand accounts, multi-media and non-fiction pieces to explore the vast cultural and societal differences of the world in which we live.
Students will discern what brings people together, and what drives nations apart. They will also study their role in human rights issues by discussing both past and present international conflicts.The course will explore appreciation for the diversity of our world, its people, customs and cultures, thus enabling students to reach a full understanding of what it means to be a global citizen today.

*Students should not enroll in this class if they have taken "Cultural Identity Through Literature".Jennifer Mcgorman
Washingtonville High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture Section FX
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An open mind and sincere desire to learn to speak and write Mandarin.
Technology requirements: Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format. Students will also need to have the Chinese language bar installed and activated. This is a free function of Windows XP. Instructions are provided below.

You must make your computer Chinese-ready before the class begins! The following screencasts are provided to teach students how to type Chinese using a Roman alphabet keyboard. Students and Site Coordinators, please make sure any computers that your students will use for this course have Simplified characters loaded and working, and that students have tried out the tasks mentioned in the screencasts below. These instructions are for Word 2003 on Windows XP, and similar steps should be applicable for other versions. If you have any questions or need assistance with this setup, please submit a Service Ticket via service.goVHS.org.

  1. Loading the Chinese Language (Flash, 3Mb, 6 min) PDF Script
  2. Editing Chinese Characters in Word
  3. Working in Pinyin (Flash, 3.5Mb, 9 min) PDF Script

Description:
What do you know about China – an ancient country whose language has 5000 years of history? Learning the language of this country will help you understand more about Chinese culture.

This Chinese Mandarin course is combination of language acquisition and Chinese culture. Emphasis is placed on the communication skills of speaking and writing. Chinese characters and writing will be introduced too.

In fifteen weeks, the teaching content will cover a variety of basic topics:
how to use Chinese Pin Yin, recognize basic Chinese characters, greetings, self-introductions, numbers, time, date, weather, pronouns, basic sentences, asking questions, basic verbs, basic adjectives, school, home, transportations, restaurant, hotel, seeing the doctor, emergencies, feelings, city , shopping and also you will do some research on Chinese culture.

Practice your listening and speaking skills. On a regular basis, converse on a wide variety of interesting topics with your virtual classmates via discussion threads and with me via private threads.Feng Xue Sure
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture Section JW
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An open mind and sincere desire to learn to speak and write Mandarin.
Technology requirements: Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format. Students will also need to have the Chinese language bar installed and activated. This is a free function of Windows XP. Instructions are provided below.

You must make your computer Chinese-ready before the class begins! The following screencasts are provided to teach students how to type Chinese using a Roman alphabet keyboard. Students and Site Coordinators, please make sure any computers that your students will use for this course have Simplified characters loaded and working, and that students have tried out the tasks mentioned in the screencasts below. These instructions are for Word 2003 on Windows XP, and similar steps should be applicable for other versions. If you have any questions or need assistance with this setup, please submit a Service Ticket via service.goVHS.org.

  1. Loading the Chinese Language (Flash, 3Mb, 6 min) PDF Script
  2. Editing Chinese Characters in Word
  3. Working in Pinyin (Flash, 3.5Mb, 9 min) PDF Script

Description: What do you know about China – an ancient country whose language has 5000 years of history? Learning the language of this country will help you understand more about Chinese culture.

This Chinese Mandarin course is combination of language acquisition and Chinese culture. Emphasis is placed on the communication skills of speaking and writing. Chinese characters and writing will be introduced too.

In fifteen weeks, the teaching content will cover a variety of basic topics:
how to use Chinese Pin Yin, recognize basic Chinese characters, greetings, self-introductions, numbers, time, date, weather, pronouns, basic sentences, asking questions, basic verbs, basic adjectives, school, home, transportations, restaurant, hotel, seeing the doctor, emergencies, feelings, city , shopping and also you will do some research on Chinese culture.

Practice your listening and speaking skills. On a regular basis, converse on a wide variety of interesting topics with your virtual classmates via discussion threads and with me via private threads.John Wang
Lyme-Old Lyme High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Mandarin Chinese Language and Culture Section PS
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
An open mind and sincere desire to learn to speak and write Mandarin.
Technology requirements: Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students must also be able to download MP3 files to school computers. Instructions will be provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format. Students will also need to have the Chinese language bar installed and activated. This is a free function of Windows XP. Instructions are provided below.

You must make your computer Chinese-ready before the class begins! The following screencasts are provided to teach students how to type Chinese using a Roman alphabet keyboard. Students and Site Coordinators, please make sure any computers that your students will use for this course have Simplified characters loaded and working, and that students have tried out the tasks mentioned in the screencasts below. These instructions are for Word 2003 on Windows XP, and similar steps should be applicable for other versions. If you have any questions or need assistance with this setup, please submit a Service Ticket via service.goVHS.org.

  1. Loading the Chinese Language (Flash, 3Mb, 6 min) PDF Script
  2. Editing Chinese Characters in Word
  3. Working in Pinyin (Flash, 3.5Mb, 9 min) PDF Script

Description:
What do you know about China – an ancient country whose language has 5000 years of history? Learning the language of this country will help you understand more about Chinese culture.

This Chinese Mandarin course is combination of language acquisition and Chinese culture. Emphasis is placed on the communication skills of speaking and writing. Chinese characters and writing will be introduced too.

In fifteen weeks, the teaching content will cover a variety of basic topics:
how to use Chinese Pin Yin, recognize basic Chinese characters, greetings, self-introductions, numbers, time, date, weather, pronouns, basic sentences, asking questions, basic verbs, basic adjectives, school, home, transportations, restaurant, hotel, seeing the doctor, emergencies, feelings, city , shopping and also you will do some research on Chinese culture.

Practice your listening and speaking skills. On a regular basis, converse on a wide variety of interesting topics with your virtual classmates via discussion threads and with me via private threads.Pialan Shi
Pennsville Memorial High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Marketing and the Internet Section DS
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Marketing or Principles of Business. A solid understanding of computer applications is very helpful.
Description: Marketing and the Internet is a study designed to couple the marketing and economic skills students have mastered in previous marketing and/or business courses with the latest technology in marketing, sales, mass media, research, and customer service presentation techniques. We will investigate the future of business on the Internet, study how e-business compares to traditional business, and find out more about the marketing strategies involved in promoting a business, and the laws affecting Internet businesses.

We'll learn about the structure of the Internet and basic design strategies to develop “sticky” sites. We will also look at traditional businesses and their use of the Internet.

Where is the future of e-commerce headed? We'll find out! Students will even get a chance to design their own virtual storefront!Diane Stelacio
Cape May County Technical School


* - - - *

Course Title: Marketing and the Internet Section LG
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Marketing or Principles of Business. A solid understanding of computer applications is very helpful.
Description: Marketing and the Internet is a study designed to couple the marketing and economic skills students have mastered in previous marketing and/or business courses with the latest technology in marketing, sales, mass media, research, and customer service presentation techniques. We will investigate the future of business on the Internet, study how e-business compares to traditional business, and find out more about the marketing strategies involved in promoting a business, and the laws affecting Internet businesses.

We'll learn about the structure of the Internet and basic design strategies to develop “sticky” sites. We will also look at traditional businesses and their use of the Internet.

Where is the future of e-commerce headed? We'll find out! Students will even get a chance to design their own virtual storefront!Lynn Gunning
Quakertown Community Sr. High


* - - - *

Course Title: Math and Modern Logic Section JL
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Completed or currently enrolled in a geometry course or equivalent.
Description:
The focus of this course is on the development of sound reasoning abilities while supporting a student's skills in applying logic to arguments and position statements in day-to-day life. Students taking this course will learn logical argument analysis, an integral part of mathematics and the scientific process, by examining arguments from both the current political environment as well as from historical speeches. This course is designed for any student who enjoys mathematics and is interested in understanding the connections between logic, mathematics, and everyday life.Jon Love
Bristol Borough High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Math and Modern Logic Section JL
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Completed or currently enrolled in a geometry course or equivalent.
Description:
The focus of this course is on the development of sound reasoning abilities while supporting a student's skills in applying logic to arguments and position statements in day-to-day life. Students taking this course will learn logical argument analysis, an integral part of mathematics and the scientific process, by examining arguments from both the current political environment as well as from historical speeches. This course is designed for any student who enjoys mathematics and is interested in understanding the connections between logic, mathematics, and everyday life.Jon Love
Bristol Borough High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Math You Can Use In College Section MP
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra II and Geometry. Students must have access to a spreadsheet program.
Description: No matter what you plan on majoring in once you go off to college, you will have to take at least one math course before you graduate. Statistics is required by just about every major. Business, science, and technology degrees need basic calculus. Even many education and liberal arts programs require a course in graphical analysis and/or trigonometry.

That is why Math You Can Use In College was developed. We will spend time on concepts you could possibly use again and not on the concepts you will probably never see after high school. This course is application-based and focuses on important real-life topics including:

-Using Trigonometry to build structures

-Understanding the mathematics behind financial decisions (calculating mortgage payments, how to calculate future value of an investment, leasing vs. buying a car)

-Using statistics to make predictions about the future

-Using quadratics to determine the distance projectiles will travel

-An introduction to calculus-based applications

A common thread throughout the course is the use of spreadsheets to help evaluate these mathematical explorations. Students should have, at a minimum, a fundamental understanding of how spreadsheets work. All students are required to have access to Microsoft Excel, or an alternative spreadsheet based program. An online graphing calculator will also be used during the course.

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.govhs.org.Mary Peters
Windham High School ME


* - - - *

Course Title: Mathematics of Electricity Private Offering: Hartford
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites:
Description: This is a private offering for students from Hartford Public High School.

This 15-week semester-long mathematics course was designed to develop pre-algebra and higher level mathematics skills using real-world electrical power industry activities and problems. This course will introduce high school students to career opportunities in the electrical power industry. Jaline Mulliken
CAEL


* - - - *

Course Title: Mathematics of Electricity Section SL: Careers in Electric Power
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Students will need access to the PhET website (http://phet.colorado.edu/) and will need the latest version of Java to run the simulations at that site.
Description: This 15-week semester-long mathematics course was designed to develop pre-algebra and higher level mathematics skills using real-world electrical power industry activities and problems. This course will introduce high school students to career opportunities in the electrical power industry. Sandi LeBlanc
Maynard High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Media and Society Section DC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of the Internet
Description: At no time in human history has the general public been exposed to the current quantity of media messages. These messages convey information of varying importance to us about nearly every aspect of the world around us. It is not an overstatement to suggest that they play a role in the development of our perceptions. Our understanding of political affairs, science and technology, entertainment, scholarship, the arts, sports, and seemingly everything else in the world is filtered through media. As such, reason would demand that we should be critical evaluators of the information that we receive, as our strict reliance on media sources provides them with enormous power over the content of the news and information that we seek. One need look no further than the death of a celebrity like Anna Nichole Smith, whose untimely passing received near saturation coverage on nearly all major news networks, in every form of media. Mind you, her death was the focus of so much attention while, at the same time, a story related to the ongoing famine in North Korea and the death of possibly three million people routinely received back-page coverage.

Why? Who is deciding what we should know? What are the factors that contribute to what is news and what is not? How much of our lives as consumers are influenced by propaganda and the advertising and public relations industries that drive our capitalist culture? Is the emphasis on violent content in media an accurate reflection of our violent culture or a major cause of it?

These are just a handful of the many questions we will be facing in our study of the modern media and its influence in our lives and culture(s). As we study our modern media, students will gain essential skills in identifying forms of media, interpreting the unique 'language' of different forms of media, differentiating fact from opinion, recognizing appeals to emotion and bias, understanding the power of propaganda and advertising, and forming reasoned opinions about the issues of the day. With these and other skills students will start to examine the media environment that surrounds them and begin to challenge and change it.
David Clark
Bellows Free Academy Fairfax


* - - - *

Course Title: Media and Society Section SC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of the Internet
Description: At no time in human history has the general public been exposed to the current quantity of media messages. These messages convey information of varying importance to us about nearly every aspect of the world around us. It is not an overstatement to suggest that they play a role in the development of our perceptions. Our understanding of political affairs, science and technology, entertainment, scholarship, the arts, sports, and seemingly everything else in the world is filtered through media. As such, reason would demand that we should be critical evaluators of the information that we receive, as our strict reliance on media sources provides them with enormous power over the content of the news and information that we seek. One need look no further than the death of a celebrity like Anna Nichole Smith, whose untimely passing received near saturation coverage on nearly all major news networks, in every form of media. Mind you, her death was the focus of so much attention while, at the same time, a story related to the ongoing famine in North Korea and the death of possibly three million people routinely received back-page coverage.

Why? Who is deciding what we should know? What are the factors that contribute to what is news and what is not? How much of our lives as consumers are influenced by propaganda and the advertising and public relations industries that drive our capitalist culture? Is the emphasis on violent content in media an accurate reflection of our violent culture or a major cause of it?

These are just a handful of the many questions we will be facing in our study of the modern media and its influence in our lives and culture(s). As we study our modern media, students will gain essential skills in identifying forms of media, interpreting the unique 'language' of different forms of media, differentiating fact from opinion, recognizing appeals to emotion and bias, understanding the power of propaganda and advertising, and forming reasoned opinions about the issues of the day. With these and other skills students will start to examine the media environment that surrounds them and begin to challenge and change it.
Susan Clarke
The Devereux Glenholme School


* - - - *

Course Title: Meteorology Section AVM
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Wonder and curiosity. Any specific skills necessary for completion of the class will be taught during the class.
Description: Earth’s weather and climates have influenced and continues to influence daily human events as well as human history. We are inundated daily with accounts of weather, both good and bad. Our daily activities depend, a great deal, on the weather. Weather phenomenon, such as hurricanes, floods and tornadoes have caused loss of life and damage of property. Loss of food crops has resulted from drought or extremes of temperature. We cannot fly a plane, have soldiers jump out of planes, or, for that matter, fight a war without consulting meteorologists to see what the weather is supposed to be on any given day. The Persian Gulf War and the Iraqi Freedom War were all planned according to the weather. The weather helped bring Allied victory on the Russian front during World War II. This class is designed to introduce you to the basic factors of weather/meteorology and to engage your natural curiosity in it. I hope you will find this course interesting as well as challenging.

This class was designed around the Internet like our daily activities are designed around the weather. Simple meteorological observations are interwoven with online based assignments, mapping activities, data gathering and graphing activities, and writing assignments to introduce students to the many facets of weather.

We will address questions such as:
What is global warming?
What might be causing it?
How does location affect temperature and precipitation?
What causes thunderstorms?
Why do most weather systems move from west to east in the United States?
Why do some not move that way?
What can we do to prepare for potential weather disasters?
Why are there more people killed by lightning in Florida than in any other place in the United States?
Which weather sayings are true and which are nonsense?
Do the cows really lay down when it is going to rain?
Where is "Tornado Alley"? Why is it there?
Why does it feel hotter when the temperature is 93 degrees with high humidity levels than it does when it's 93 degrees and low humidity?
How real was the movie "Twister"?
Or for that matter, how real was the weather forecast for today?

Join us to find out the answers to these and many other questions related to weather.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Anne Van Meter
Jenkintown High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Meteorology Section CD
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Wonder and curiosity. Any specific skills necessary for completion of the class will be taught during the class.
Description: Earth’s weather and climates have influenced and continues to influence daily human events as well as human history. We are inundated daily with accounts of weather, both good and bad. Our daily activities depend, a great deal, on the weather. Weather phenomenon, such as hurricanes, floods and tornadoes have caused loss of life and damage of property. Loss of food crops has resulted from drought or extremes of temperature. We cannot fly a plane, have soldiers jump out of planes, or, for that matter, fight a war without consulting meteorologists to see what the weather is supposed to be on any given day. The Persian Gulf War and the Iraqi Freedom War were all planned according to the weather. The weather helped bring Allied victory on the Russian front during World War II. This class is designed to introduce you to the basic factors of weather/meteorology and to engage your natural curiosity in it. I hope you will find this course interesting as well as challenging.

This class was designed around the Internet like our daily activities are designed around the weather. Simple meteorological observations are interwoven with online based assignments, mapping activities, data gathering and graphing activities, and writing assignments to introduce students to the many facets of weather.

We will address questions such as:
What is global warming?
What might be causing it?
How does location affect temperature and precipitation?
What causes thunderstorms?
Why do most weather systems move from west to east in the United States?
Why do some not move that way?
What can we do to prepare for potential weather disasters?
Why are there more people killed by lightning in Florida than in any other place in the United States?
Which weather sayings are true and which are nonsense?
Do the cows really lay down when it is going to rain?
Where is "Tornado Alley"? Why is it there?
Why does it feel hotter when the temperature is 93 degrees with high humidity levels than it does when it's 93 degrees and low humidity?
How real was the movie "Twister"?
Or for that matter, how real was the weather forecast for today?

Join us to find out the answers to these and many other questions related to weather.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Catherine DeNoia
Wheeler High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Meteorology Section RM
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Wonder and curiosity. Any specific skills necessary for completion of the class will be taught during the class.
Description: Earth’s weather and climates have influenced and continues to influence daily human events as well as human history. We are inundated daily with accounts of weather, both good and bad. Our daily activities depend, a great deal, on the weather. Weather phenomenon, such as hurricanes, floods and tornadoes have caused loss of life and damage of property. Loss of food crops has resulted from drought or extremes of temperature. We cannot fly a plane, have soldiers jump out of planes, or, for that matter, fight a war without consulting meteorologists to see what the weather is supposed to be on any given day. The Persian Gulf War and the Iraqi Freedom War were all planned according to the weather. The weather helped bring Allied victory on the Russian front during World War II. This class is designed to introduce you to the basic factors of weather/meteorology and to engage your natural curiosity in it. I hope you will find this course interesting as well as challenging.

This class was designed around the Internet like our daily activities are designed around the weather. Simple meteorological observations are interwoven with online based assignments, mapping activities, data gathering and graphing activities, and writing assignments to introduce students to the many facets of weather.

We will address questions such as:
What is global warming?
What might be causing it?
How does location affect temperature and precipitation?
What causes thunderstorms?
Why do most weather systems move from west to east in the United States?
Why do some not move that way?
What can we do to prepare for potential weather disasters?
Why are there more people killed by lightning in Florida than in any other place in the United States?
Which weather sayings are true and which are nonsense?
Do the cows really lay down when it is going to rain?
Where is "Tornado Alley"? Why is it there?
Why does it feel hotter when the temperature is 93 degrees with high humidity levels than it does when it's 93 degrees and low humidity?
How real was the movie "Twister"?
Or for that matter, how real was the weather forecast for today?

Join us to find out the answers to these and many other questions related to weather.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Robert Demarco
Marlboro Central High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Modern Middle East Section DL
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: System Requirements:
· Streaming video access (for YouTube videos)
· Elluminate access
· Windows Media or Real Player
· Quicktime
· Adobe Reader
Description: This course explores the history of the Middle East (focusing primarily on the last century), and examines the relationships within the region and beyond. Topics of study include the development of Islam, the impact of imperialism, the rise of nationalism, the effects of British and French rule, Arab-Israeli relations, and the political and economic impact of oil.

Since 9/11, interest in the Middle East and Islamic studies has increased dramatically. In response, media, schools, politics, and pop culture, have all expanded their coverage of the region and its culture. As a student in this course, you are part of a larger movement seeking to better understand the people, ideas, and events of this area. Moreover, you will form your own generalized and nuanced understanding of the Middle East.Dave LaFontana
Chelsea High School


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Business Foundations Section JF
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Ability to manipulate numbers and use simple pre-algebra formulas.
It is suggested that students have headphones for this class, but it is not required. Students will be using a voice board during this class and will need to listen to and record messages. If your school does not have the necessary equipment for this tool, students can still participate by typing their messages into the voice board.
Description: We hear about stock market gains and losses in the news each day – but what does it all really mean? In this course, you will learn about the fundamentals of investing, and even have the chance to invest your money and compare your results with the rest of the class!

We will learn how to create a budget, learn about banks and checking accounts, and discover how quickly money can grow. What do you know about credit and credit cards? In this course you will have the opportunity to look at credit card offers and learn about the ways credit card companies get new customers.

Have you ever thought of starting a part-time business? In this class you will have the opportunity to decide what type of business you would like to own, create your own advertisements, and learn about business competition.

Finally…accounting, what is it? This course will help you understand the importance of accounting concepts and how all businesses, including yours, need them! If you are interested in business and like using math in real world situations, join us as we discover MS Business Foundations!

** This course may also be appropriate for gifted and talented 6th grade students who have met the prerequisites**Jacqui Frongello
Sacred Heart High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: MS Business Foundations Section JF
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Ability to manipulate numbers and use simple pre-algebra formulas.
It is suggested that students have headphones for this class, but it is not required. Students will be using a voice board during this class and will need to listen to and record messages. If your school does not have the necessary equipment for this tool, students can still participate by typing their messages into the voice board.
Description: We hear about stock market gains and losses in the news each day – but what does it all really mean? In this course, you will learn about the fundamentals of investing, and even have the chance to invest your money and compare your results with the rest of the class!

We will learn how to create a budget, learn about banks and checking accounts, and discover how quickly money can grow. What do you know about credit and credit cards? In this course you will have the opportunity to look at credit card offers and learn about the ways credit card companies get new customers.

Have you ever thought of starting a part-time business? In this class you will have the opportunity to decide what type of business you would like to own, create your own advertisements, and learn about business competition.

Finally…accounting, what is it? This course will help you understand the importance of accounting concepts and how all businesses, including yours, need them! If you are interested in business and like using math in real world situations, join us as we discover MS Business Foundations!

** This course may also be appropriate for gifted and talented 6th grade students who have met the prerequisites**Jacqui Frongello
Sacred Heart High School


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Business Foundations Section MG
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Ability to manipulate numbers and use simple pre-algebra formulas.
It is suggested that students have headphones for this class, but it is not required. Students will be using a voice board during this class and will need to listen to and record messages. If your school does not have the necessary equipment for this tool, students can still participate by typing their messages into the voice board.
Description: We hear about stock market gains and losses in the news each day – but what does it all really mean? In this course, you will learn about the fundamentals of investing, and even have the chance to invest your money and compare your results with the rest of the class!

We will learn how to create a budget, learn about banks and checking accounts, and discover how quickly money can grow. What do you know about credit and credit cards? In this course you will have the opportunity to look at credit card offers and learn about the ways credit card companies get new customers.

Have you ever thought of starting a part-time business? In this class you will have the opportunity to decide what type of business you would like to own, create your own advertisements, and learn about business competition.

Finally…accounting, what is it? This course will help you understand the importance of accounting concepts and how all businesses, including yours, need them! If you are interested in business and like using math in real world situations, join us as we discover MS Business Foundations!

** This course may also be appropriate for gifted and talented 6th grade students who have met the prerequisites**Marcia Grant
Arthur W Coolidge Middle School


* - - - *,
Course Title: MS Business Foundations Section MG
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Ability to manipulate numbers and use simple pre-algebra formulas.
It is suggested that students have headphones for this class, but it is not required. Students will be using a voice board during this class and will need to listen to and record messages. If your school does not have the necessary equipment for this tool, students can still participate by typing their messages into the voice board.
Description: We hear about stock market gains and losses in the news each day – but what does it all really mean? In this course, you will learn about the fundamentals of investing, and even have the chance to invest your money and compare your results with the rest of the class!

We will learn how to create a budget, learn about banks and checking accounts, and discover how quickly money can grow. What do you know about credit and credit cards? In this course you will have the opportunity to look at credit card offers and learn about the ways credit card companies get new customers.

Have you ever thought of starting a part-time business? In this class you will have the opportunity to decide what type of business you would like to own, create your own advertisements, and learn about business competition.

Finally…accounting, what is it? This course will help you understand the importance of accounting concepts and how all businesses, including yours, need them! If you are interested in business and like using math in real world situations, join us as we discover MS Business Foundations!

** This course may also be appropriate for gifted and talented 6th grade students who have met the prerequisites**Marcia Grant
Arthur W Coolidge Middle School


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Civics Section JN
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 05, 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Windows Media Player - camera/scanner
Description: Welcome to Civics – When You Rule the World! This course will help get you thinking about citizenship and what it takes to be a good citizen in your world, country, neighborhood and family. We will look into the different types of government that exist in the world.  We will also investigate global issues that are facing the world today and how they may affect your future. You'll also better understand what YOU as a middle school student can do to make a difference!Julie Nichols
Columbia Public Schools


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Creative Writing
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Stories exist all around us. They help us share our hopes and our fears. They show our beliefs in how things are around us, and our dreams for how they could be. In this course, we act as authors and read the work of other authors, and we walk in the footsteps of writers by writing. Each week, we will work with one grammar skill, experience one reading selection and discuss it with peers, and work on one piece of our own writing. This is a learn-by-doing course, so be prepared to take chances, and stretch your writing muscles.Melissa Paradis
Cumberland Public Schools


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Engineering Section LS
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: This is a challenging course designed for motivated students with an aptitude for math and a special interest in Engineering.

Have you ever looked around and saw buildings, bridges, or other outdoor facilities that were breathtaking? If so, you might be interested in taking this on-line course. We are going to explore, research, and ultimately construct structures with various engineering techniques. You see, engineering is the “process” of creating and testing new ideas to make the world a better place. Engineers design many things. Some design computer applications, combustion engines, roadways, and electronics.

Engineering: Up-Up and Away!, will allow you to exercise your creativity, stretch your imagination, and work collaboratively with students around the world. The world will always be looking for new and dynamic engineers, why not start now?Lance Smalley
Sutton Middle School


* - - - *,
Course Title: MS Engineering Section LS
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: This is a challenging course designed for motivated students with an aptitude for math and a special interest in Engineering.

Have you ever looked around and saw buildings, bridges, or other outdoor facilities that were breathtaking? If so, you might be interested in taking this on-line course. We are going to explore, research, and ultimately construct structures with various engineering techniques. You see, engineering is the “process” of creating and testing new ideas to make the world a better place. Engineers design many things. Some design computer applications, combustion engines, roadways, and electronics.

Engineering: Up-Up and Away!, will allow you to exercise your creativity, stretch your imagination, and work collaboratively with students around the world. The world will always be looking for new and dynamic engineers, why not start now?Lance Smalley
Sutton Middle School


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Number Theory Section AM
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: A background in pre-algebra skills, a love of puzzle solving and code cracking, access to the internet on a daily basis, and persistence.
Description: Did you ever sit in math and say “What kind of person thought up this stuff? Have you ever lost track of time blazing through a difficult puzzle or video game? If so, this is the class for you! Math is everywhere you look; in paintings, in nature, in architecture, even in the movies. This class will investigate some intriguing principles of math and the people behind them. It will challenge you to create your own math puzzlers and will give you an opportunity to crack some famous codes and cryptograms. Math? Fun? Give it a try!Adam Mielniczuk
Global Collegiate Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Number Theory Section TR
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: A background in pre-algebra skills, a love of puzzle solving and code cracking, access to the internet on a daily basis, and persistence.
Description: Did you ever sit in math and say “What kind of person thought up this stuff? Have you ever lost track of time blazing through a difficult puzzle or video game? If so, this is the class for you! Math is everywhere you look; in paintings, in nature, in architecture, even in the movies. This class will investigate some intriguing principals of math and the people behind them. It will challenge you to create your own math puzzlers and will give you an opportunity to crack some famous codes and cryptograms. Math? Fun? Give it a try!Timothy Ryan
Medway High School


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Pre-Algebra Section CL
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: This course is designed to teach the central concepts of Pre-Algebra to first-time students or students who need to review skills before entering Algebra. During this 15-week course students will cover topics such as Order of Operations, Variables, Tables, Graphs and Equations.Cheryl Leonard
Hampden Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: MS Society and Humanity Section HS
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Students examine the influence of society, the groups we belong to, and institutions like government, family, education, religion, media, etc. on human behavior. We use popular movies and contemporary events, plus research, as the foundations for class discussions of issues. Issues include: crime and who defines criminal behavior and the legal response to it; gender inequality in the workplace; and the impact of media on violence and sexual behavior. Poverty and minority groups are also discussed with a focus on how being a person of color shapes one's opportunities and life chances.

Students are exposed to the possibility of community-wide responses to social problems, instead of the "fix the individual" approach. In this class, students will also experience the scientific method of studying society, through design and execution of a survey and interpretation of results.
Haley Street
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: MS The Teenage Brain Section DK
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Students will need to have access to a copy of the text "Blame My Brain" by Nicola Morgan, from their local library.
Description: This course is called "The Teenage Brain: What’s Going on in There?". And that’s exactly the question we will try to answer. During the first part of this course, you will learn some basic facts about neuroscience. Once you’ve got those down, we will start learning and discussing what scientists think is going on inside the teenage brain. It’s perfect, because you have the ideal person to test out their theories on – yourself!Diana Kloskowski
Global Collegiate Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: MS World War II Through the Eyes of Dr. Seuss Section JS
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: You will need to obtain the following Dr. Seuss books: Yertle the Turtle, The Sneetches, Horton Hears a Who, and The Butter Battle Book. You should be able to obtain copies of these books from your public libraries.

Description:

Can you really learn something about history by reading Dr. Seuss? Yes, and if you take this course, you will! Challenge yourself to look beyond the simplicity. In World War II Through the Eyes of Dr. Seuss, you will encounter new stories, new questions, and new ways of looking at the works of Dr. Seuss. You will have many opportunities to share, create, and discuss interpretations of Dr. Seuss' works by merging your experiences with others: the author, his whimsical characters, and infamous historical figures, as you explore controversial topics, such as fascism, anti-Semitism, and racism.Joshua Scherer
Global Collegiate Academy


* - - - *,
Course Title: MS World War II Through the Eyes of Dr. Seuss Section JS
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: You will need to obtain the following Dr. Seuss books: Yertle the Turtle, The Sneetches, Horton Hears a Who, and The Butter Battle Book. You should be able to obtain copies of these books from your public libraries.

Description:

Can you really learn something about history by reading Dr. Seuss? Yes, and if you take this course, you will! Challenge yourself to look beyond the simplicity. In World War II Through the Eyes of Dr. Seuss, you will encounter new stories, new questions, and new ways of looking at the works of Dr. Seuss. You will have many opportunities to share, create, and discuss interpretations of Dr. Seuss' works by merging your experiences with others: the author, his whimsical characters, and infamous historical figures, as you explore controversial topics, such as fascism, anti-Semitism, and racism.Joshua Scherer
Global Collegiate Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: MS World War II Through the Eyes of Dr. Seuss Section KJ
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: You will need to obtain the following Dr. Seuss books: Yertle the Turtle, The Sneetches, Horton Hears a Who, and The Butter Battle Book. You should be able to obtain copies of these books from your public libraries.

Description:

Can you really learn something about history by reading Dr. Seuss? Yes, and if you take this course, you will! Challenge yourself to look beyond the simplicity. In World War II Through the Eyes of Dr. Seuss, you will encounter new stories, new questions, and new ways of looking at the works of Dr. Seuss. You will have many opportunities to share, create, and discuss interpretations of Dr. Seuss' works by merging your experiences with others: the author, his whimsical characters, and infamous historical figures, as you explore controversial topics, such as fascism, anti-Semitism, and racism.Keith Johnson
Lincoln School


* - - - *,
Course Title: MS World War II Through the Eyes of Dr. Seuss Section KJ
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 06, 07, 08
Level: Middle School
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: You will need to obtain the following Dr. Seuss books: Yertle the Turtle, The Sneetches, Horton Hears a Who, and The Butter Battle Book. You should be able to obtain copies of these books from your public libraries.

Description:

Can you really learn something about history by reading Dr. Seuss? Yes, and if you take this course, you will! Challenge yourself to look beyond the simplicity. In World War II Through the Eyes of Dr. Seuss, you will encounter new stories, new questions, and new ways of looking at the works of Dr. Seuss. You will have many opportunities to share, create, and discuss interpretations of Dr. Seuss' works by merging your experiences with others: the author, his whimsical characters, and infamous historical figures, as you explore controversial topics, such as fascism, anti-Semitism, and racism.Keith Johnson
Lincoln School


* - - - *

Course Title: Music Listening and Critique Section JW
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Music Listening and Critique is a fifteen-week course that will take you into the world of a music as a listener and writer. You will explore how to listen to music, how to write about what you are hearing and how to analyze and appreciate different styles of music.

You and your classmates will have the opportunity to listen to a wide variety of music from four stylistic areas: World Music, Jazz, Classical and Popular Music. You will be listening to many examples weekly that are stored for you in the Listening Library. You will compare and contrast the different styles with your classmates in discussions and formal essays.

National Public Radio (NPR) shows are used extensively in this course through radio streaming. There are interviews with various musical artists and reviews by music critics. The NPR shows will include musicians from all around the world. There is a wealth of information from the NPR segments you will have the opportunity to hear in the artists’ own words.

It is essential that you have a Media Player on the computer you are using so that you can listen to the music examples. They are all stored in the Media Center of this course. Be sure that your site coordinator and you have examined the information in the Start-Up folder for this course so that you have things up and running when it is time to begin.

We also have a textbook for the course written by Aaron Copland. It is What to Listen for in Music. It will help us have a common vocabulary to use when discussing music and works well for all styles of music. You will have some assignments based on your reading.

This course is designed to help you understand the nature of music through listening. It is not required that you read music to take this course. However, if you are a literate musician, you will probably find it enjoyable to take the time to sit back and listen actively to a wide variety of musicians. If you are a garage band enthusiast or overcommitted to one style of music, this is a chance for you to painlessly spread open your horizons to explore some new territory.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Jennifer Wojcik
The Gunnery


* - - - *

Course Title: Music Listening and Critique Section MS
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

Music Listening and Critique is a fifteen-week course that will take you into the world of a music as a listener and writer. You will explore how to listen to music, how to write about what you are hearing and how to analyze and appreciate different styles of music.

You and your classmates will have the opportunity to listen to a wide variety of music from four stylistic areas: World Music, Jazz, Classical and Popular Music. You will be listening to many examples weekly that are stored for you in the Listening Library. You will compare and contrast the different styles with your classmates in discussions and formal essays.

National Public Radio (NPR) shows are used extensively in this course through radio streaming. There are interviews with various musical artists and reviews by music critics. The NPR shows will include musicians from all around the world. There is a wealth of information from the NPR segments you will have the opportunity to hear in the artists’ own words.

It is essential that you have a Media Player on the computer you are using so that you can listen to the music examples. They are all stored in the Media Center of this course. Be sure that your site coordinator and you have examined the information in the Start-Up folder for this course so that you have things up and running when it is time to begin.

We also have a textbook for the course written by Aaron Copland. It is What to Listen for in Music. It will help us have a common vocabulary to use when discussing music and works well for all styles of music. You will have some assignments based on your reading.

This course is designed to help you understand the nature of music through listening. It is not required that you read music to take this course. However, if you are a literate musician, you will probably find it enjoyable to take the time to sit back and listen actively to a wide variety of musicians. If you are a garage band enthusiast or overcommitted to one style of music, this is a chance for you to painlessly spread open your horizons to explore some new territory.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Maria Swartz
North Warren Central School


* - - - *

Course Title: Music: Fundamentals of Composition Section IS:
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: All students are expected to know how to WRITE and READ music in treble and bass clefs. Basic computer proficiency is desirable. Each student will also need a computer with compatible sound card. If you ARE familiar with the keyboard of the piano, a synthesizer and MIDI cables will be very useful however synthesizer is NOT mandatory.

System Requirements for Noteflight
* Headphones and Sound
Students must have headphones and access to a computer with sound capability.

* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:
http://mudacomk-f11.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

* Email
Registration confirmation emails are sent from the address noreply@noteflight.com. Some spam filters may block this address as potential spam. To prevent this from happening, please send a blank email to noreply@noteflight.com or add this address to your "Safe Senders" list.

* Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting:
http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

* Browser and OS compatability
Noteflight is supported on any operating system and browser for which Flash Player 10 is supported, including:
* Firefox 2 and 3 (MacOS, Windows, Linux)
* Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8 (Windows)
* Safari 3 and 4 (MacOS)
* Opera 9 (MacOS, Windows, Linux)
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This course is designed to give students a good understanding and working knowledge of the fundamental components of music, and to lead them through the process of creating their own compositions. The course will focus on music composed in the Western tonal style. An essential part of the course will be learning to use the available digital technology such as computers, MIDI and keyboards. Students will learn concepts such as chords, progressions, and melody writing, which they will use as they compose music.

Please Note: The course will run for one semester. Students will be expected to log on at least four times a week in order to keep up with the assignments. Students are not expected to purchase materials for the course. Online resources will be used.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Ivan Stefanov
Bishop Fenwick High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Music: Fundamentals of Composition Section MK:
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: All students are expected to know how to WRITE and READ music in treble and bass clefs. Basic computer proficiency is desirable. Each student will also need a computer with compatible sound card. If you ARE familiar with the keyboard of the piano, a synthesizer and MIDI cables will be very useful however synthesizer is NOT mandatory.

System Requirements for Noteflight
* Headphones and Sound
Students must have headphones and access to a computer with sound capability.

* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:
http://mudacomk-f11.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

* Email
Registration confirmation emails are sent from the address noreply@noteflight.com. Some spam filters may block this address as potential spam. To prevent this from happening, please send a blank email to noreply@noteflight.com or add this address to your "Safe Senders" list.

* Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting:
http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

* Browser and OS compatability
Noteflight is supported on any operating system and browser for which Flash Player 10 is supported, including:
* Firefox 2 and 3 (MacOS, Windows, Linux)
* Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8 (Windows)
* Safari 3 and 4 (MacOS)
* Opera 9 (MacOS, Windows, Linux)
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This course is designed to give students a good understanding and working knowledge of the fundamental components of music, and to lead them through the process of creating their own compositions. The course will focus on music composed in the Western tonal style. An essential part of the course will be learning to use the available digital technology such as computers, MIDI and keyboards. Students will learn concepts such as chords, progressions, and melody writing, which they will use as they compose music.

Please Note: The course will run for one semester. Students will be expected to log on at least four times a week in order to keep up with the assignments. Students are not expected to purchase materials for the course. Online resources will be used.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Margaret Korab
Shrewsbury High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Music: Fundamentals of Composition Section SC
Discipline: Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: All students are expected to know how to WRITE and READ music in treble and bass clefs. Basic computer proficiency is desirable. Each student will also need a computer with compatible sound card. If you ARE familiar with the keyboard of the piano, a synthesizer and MIDI cables will be very useful however synthesizer is NOT mandatory.

System Requirements for Noteflight
* Headphones and Sound
Students must have headphones and access to a computer with sound capability.

* Web access to Noteflight
Students need access all three of the following URLs:

http://undermsc-s10.vhs.noteflight.com
http://instruments.noteflight.com
http://assets.noteflight.com

* Email
Registration confirmation emails are sent from the address noreply@noteflight.com. Some spam filters may block this address as potential spam. To prevent this from happening, please send a blank email to noreply@noteflight.com or add this address to your "Safe Senders" list.

* Flash
Flash Player 10.0.32.18 or greater is the recommended version for all Noteflight users. You can download the current version of the player from Adobe by visiting:
http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

* Browser and OS compatability
Noteflight is supported on any operating system and browser for which Flash Player 10 is supported, including:
* Firefox 2 and 3 (MacOS, Windows, Linux)
* Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8 (Windows)
* Safari 3 and 4 (MacOS)
* Opera 9 (MacOS, Windows, Linux)
Description: **Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.

This course is designed to give students a good understanding and working knowledge of the fundamental components of music, and to lead them through the process of creating their own compositions. The course will focus on music composed in the Western tonal style. An essential part of the course will be learning to use the available digital technology such as computers, MIDI and keyboards. Students will learn concepts such as chords, progressions, and melody writing, which they will use as they compose music.

Please Note: The course will run for one semester. Students will be expected to log on at least four times a week in order to keep up with the assignments. Students are not expected to purchase materials for the course. Online resources will be used.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Steven Carey
Pitman High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Mythology Section HR
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: Do you love mythology? Do you wish there was more of it than was introduced in your literature class? Well, this is the class for you! This course is designed to enhance your understanding of mythology and its continuing influence on our modern world. You will study mythology from various cultures, including Greco-Roman, Norse, and American Indian. We will examine how some themes and character types occur over and over in myths of different cultures. Reading, individual projects/activities, and group work will be part of this class.


*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Holly Russell
Eugene Public School District 4J


* - - - *

Course Title: Mythology Section KC
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: Do you love mythology? Do you wish there was more of it than was introduced in your literature class? Well, this is the class for you! This course is designed to enhance your understanding of mythology and its continuing influence on our modern world. You will study mythology from various cultures, including Greco-Roman, Norse, and American Indian. We will examine how some themes and character types occur over and over in myths of different cultures. Reading, individual projects/activities, and group work will be part of this class.


*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Kathleen Casavant
Oxford High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Mythology Section PM
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: Do you love mythology? Do you wish there was more of it than was introduced in your literature class? Well, this is the class for you! This course is designed to enhance your understanding of mythology and its continuing influence on our modern world. You will study mythology from various cultures, including Greco-Roman, Norse, and American Indian. We will examine how some themes and character types occur over and over in myths of different cultures. Reading, individual projects/activities, and group work will be part of this class.


*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Paul Macek
St. Peter Marian Jr/Sr High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Mythology Section VR
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: Do you love mythology? Do you wish there was more of it than was introduced in your literature class? Well, this is the class for you! This course is designed to enhance your understanding of mythology and its continuing influence on our modern world. You will study mythology from various cultures, including Greco-Roman, Norse, and American Indian. We will examine how some themes and character types occur over and over in myths of different cultures. Reading, individual projects/activities, and group work will be part of this class.


*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Vicki Regis
Hackettstown High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Now What Will You Do?: Life After High School
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Your time in high school is coming to a close – now what will you do for the next 50+ years? In this course, we will examine what you should consider when thinking through these important decisions. You will learn what you need to know in order to make smart choices now and in the future.

Whether you plan to go to college, to seek immediate job opportunity, or you're just not sure - this course will show you the way. Learn about current and future trends so you can prepare yourself to be competitive today and tomorrow.

How do you choose the career that’s best for you in an environment where you may be preparing for a career that does not exist today? There is no one career that’s best for everyone. Although we all have different skills, interests, experiences and expectations, the career planning process is the same:

·Discover your personality, abilities, skills and priorities
·Match possible careers to your personality
·Investigate potential careers to see if there is a fit
·Prepare a plan to pursue your career choice.Kelly Markland
Wahconah Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Now What Will You Do? Section GC: Life After High School
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Your time in high school is coming to a close – now what will you do for the next 50+ years? In this course, we will examine what you should consider when thinking through these important decisions. You will learn what you need to know in order to make smart choices now and in the future.

Whether you plan to go to college, to seek immediate job opportunity, or you're just not sure - this course will show you the way. Learn about current and future trends so you can prepare yourself to be competitive today and tomorrow.

How do you choose the career that’s best for you in an environment where you may be preparing for a career that does not exist today? There is no one career that’s best for everyone. Although we all have different skills, interests, experiences and expectations, the career planning process is the same:

·Discover your personality, abilities, skills and priorities
·Match possible careers to your personality
·Investigate potential careers to see if there is a fit
·Prepare a plan to pursue your career choice.Gail Canon
Easthampton High School


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Course Title: Nuclear Physics
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: The student should have good math and writing skills and a basic understanding of atomic structure. It would also be helpful if the student has some experience with graphing calculators.
Description: The focus of this course are the scientific, technological, and societal implications arising from nuclear physics. Students have an opportunity to explore, in-depth, a topic that has played a major role in the science, technology, politics, philosophy, and everyday life of the past century. The student's primary goal during the course is to answer the question: "What should an informed citizen know about nuclear issues?" The student has some flexibility choosing the areas they wish to concentrate on.

The science topics in the course include the history of discovery, types of nuclear reactions, interactions between radiation and matter, the standard model of subatomic matter and current research. Although some math is used to provide better understanding of the concepts covered, math problems are not the primary focus of the course.

The technology portion includes the design and function of particle detectors, particle accelerators, nuclear reactors, nuclear bombs and nuclear waste facilities. Current and future uses of radiation in industry and medicine are also investigated.

The society portion of the course is the one where many students concentrate their efforts. The weekly discussions on controversial nuclear topics are always interesting. They provide opportunities to look back at the politics behind weapons development and use, the Cold War, nuclear proliferation, and the atomic energy industry. Discussions during the course will include topics that have made recent headlines; such as food irradiation, nuclear reactors in space, Radon mitigation, the demise of the Super-Conducting Super-Collider, the theft of nuclear secrets, and nuclear test ban treaties.Edward Chomka
Sutton Memorial High School


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Course Title: Number Theory Section FW
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra I
Description: Number Theory began as a playground for a few mathematicians that were fascinated by the curious properties of numbers. Today, it has numerous applications from pencil and paper algorithms, to the solving of puzzles, to the design of computer software, to cryptanalysis (a science of code breaking).

Number Theory uses the familiar operations of arithmetic (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division), but more as the starting point of intriguing investigations than as topics of primary interest. Number Theory is more involved in finding relations, patterns, and the structure of numbers.

This Number Theory course will cover topics such as the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, Euclid's Algorithm, Pascal's Triangle, Fermat's Last Theorem, and Pythagorean Triples. We will finish the course with a linkage of Number Theory to Cryptography. In today's world of high speed communication, banks, corporations, law enforcement agencies and so on need to transmit confidential information over public phone lines or airwaves to a large number of other similar institutions. Prime numbers and composite numbers play a crucial role in many cryptographic schemes.

Come taste the flavor of the purest of pure mathematics. This course is open to any student having basic algebra or higher mathematics who is challenged by puzzles and mathematics problems. It will run for a full semester.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Frank Wrublevski Iii
Metuchen High School


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Course Title: Number Theory Section TL
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra I
Description: Number Theory began as a playground for a few mathematicians that were fascinated by the curious properties of numbers. Today, it has numerous applications from pencil and paper algorithms, to the solving of puzzles, to the design of computer software, to cryptanalysis (a science of code breaking).

Number Theory uses the familiar operations of arithmetic (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division), but more as the starting point of intriguing investigations than as topics of primary interest. Number Theory is more involved in finding relations, patterns, and the structure of numbers.

This Number Theory course will cover topics such as the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, Euclid's Algorithm, Pascal's Triangle, Fermat's Last Theorem, and Pythagorean Triples. We will finish the course with a linkage of Number Theory to Cryptography. In today's world of high speed communication, banks, corporations, law enforcement agencies and so on need to transmit confidential information over public phone lines or airwaves to a large number of other similar institutions. Prime numbers and composite numbers play a crucial role in many cryptographic schemes.

Come taste the flavor of the purest of pure mathematics. This course is open to any student having basic algebra or higher mathematics who is challenged by puzzles and mathematics problems. It will run for a full semester.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Timothy Lamarre
South Portland High School


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Course Title: Oceanography Section BB
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: It is strongly recommended that students have a working knowledge of basic Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry.
There is no media kit for this class. Students will be expected to provide “kitchen science equipment” such as a clear plastic container, food coloring, aluminum foil, paper towels, etc.
Description: "There are no passengers on Spaceship Earth. We are all crew." Marshall McLuhan.

Students will board the USS Cyber, a virtual oceanographic research vessel modeled after the flagship of NOAA's fleet for a sail that begins in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and ends in the Gulf of Alaska. As the crew of the ship, students will perform scientific experiments and collect data that will teach them about the geology, chemistry, and physics of the ocean. From the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia to the Caribbean and the Californian coast, from the coral reefs to the extreme hydrothermal vent communities, students will make observations about the sea's ecosystems and the sometimes-unexpected life within them. Students are expected to participate fully as members of the expedition. If you've ever wondered what it might be like to go to sea, pack your bags, and join us.

This is an honors level survey course covering the basics of physical oceanography and marine biology presented in a fun and engaging format. Prospective students need to be self-motivated, willing to work in a team environment and have previously been enrolled in honors level science courses. Individual assignments, topical discussions, group projects and regular reading checks take the place of traditional tests. In lieu of a midterm or final exam, students will be expected to complete a major individual project each term. The weekly assignments often rely on a multimedia component. In addition, students will be expected to access and analyze real oceanographic data which may require the use of a spreadsheet program such as Excel. Writing assignments range from informal discussions to formal lab reports and term papers that include appropriate citations. The course is fast-paced and rigorous but would still be suitable for a highly-motivated eighth grader. No prior knowledge of oceanography is expected.
Barend Blom
Dalat International School


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Course Title: Oceanography Section DM
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: It is strongly recommended that students have a working knowledge of basic Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry.
There is no media kit for this class. Students will be expected to provide “kitchen science equipment” such as a clear plastic container, food coloring, aluminum foil, paper towels, etc.
Description:
“There are no passengers on Spaceship Earth. We are all crew.” Marshall McLuhan.

Students will board the USS Cyber, a virtual oceanographic research vessel modeled after the flagship of NOAA’s fleet for a sail that begins in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and ends in San Diego, California. As the crew of the ship, students will perform scientific experiments and collect data that will teach them about the geology, chemistry, and physics of the ocean. From the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia to the Caribbean and Antarctica, from the coral reefs to the hydrothermal vent communities deep in the ocean, students will make observations about the sea’s ecosystems and the sometimes-unexpected life within them. There are no traditional tests. Students are expected to participate fully as members of the expedition. If you’ve ever wondered what it might be like to go to sea, pack your bags, and join us.

This is a survey course covering the basics of physical oceanography and marine biology presented in a fun and engaging format. There are no traditional tests. Students will be graded on their weekly assignments, which will include both individual and group projects. In lieu of a midterm or final exam, students will be expected to complete a major individual project each term. Prospective students need to be self-motivated and willing to work in a team environment. There will be a strong multimedia component to the course, and students will have the opportunity to choose from reading assignments that meet their comfort level. The course is fast-paced and rigorous. No prior knowledge of oceanography is expected.
David Mitchell
Hazen Union School


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Course Title: Oceanography Section JS
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: It is strongly recommended that students have a working knowledge of basic Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry.
There is no media kit for this class. Students will be expected to provide “kitchen science equipment” such as a clear plastic container, food coloring, aluminum foil, paper towels, etc.
Description: "There are no passengers on Spaceship Earth. We are all crew." Marshall McLuhan.

Students will board the USS Cyber, a virtual oceanographic research vessel modeled after the flagship of NOAA's fleet for a sail that begins in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and ends in the Gulf of Alaska. As the crew of the ship, students will perform scientific experiments and collect data that will teach them about the geology, chemistry, and physics of the ocean. From the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia to the Caribbean and the Californian coast, from the coral reefs to the extreme hydrothermal vent communities, students will make observations about the sea's ecosystems and the sometimes-unexpected life within them. Students are expected to participate fully as members of the expedition. If you've ever wondered what it might be like to go to sea, pack your bags, and join us.

This is an honors level survey course covering the basics of physical oceanography and marine biology presented in a fun and engaging format. Prospective students need to be self-motivated, willing to work in a team environment and have previously been enrolled in honors level science courses. Individual assignments, topical discussions, group projects and regular reading checks take the place of traditional tests. In lieu of a midterm or final exam, students will be expected to complete a major individual project each term. The weekly assignments often rely on a multimedia component. In addition, students will be expected to access and analyze real oceanographic data which may require the use of a spreadsheet program such as Excel. Writing assignments range from informal discussions to formal lab reports and term papers that include appropriate citations. The course is fast-paced and rigorous but would still be suitable for a highly-motivated eighth grader. No prior knowledge of oceanography is expected.
Julie Stratton
Cape May County Technical School


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Course Title: Oceanography Section SD
Discipline: Science - General
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: It is strongly recommended that students have a working knowledge of basic Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry.
There is no media kit for this class. Students will be expected to provide “kitchen science equipment” such as a clear plastic container, food coloring, aluminum foil, paper towels, etc.
Description: "There are no passengers on Spaceship Earth. We are all crew." Marshall McLuhan.

Students will board the USS Cyber, a virtual oceanographic research vessel modeled after the flagship of NOAA's fleet for a sail that begins in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and ends in the Gulf of Alaska. As the crew of the ship, students will perform scientific experiments and collect data that will teach them about the geology, chemistry, and physics of the ocean. From the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia to the Caribbean and the Californian coast, from the coral reefs to the extreme hydrothermal vent communities, students will make observations about the sea's ecosystems and the sometimes-unexpected life within them. Students are expected to participate fully as members of the expedition. If you've ever wondered what it might be like to go to sea, pack your bags, and join us.

This is an honors level survey course covering the basics of physical oceanography and marine biology presented in a fun and engaging format. Prospective students need to be self-motivated, willing to work in a team environment and have previously been enrolled in honors level science courses. Individual assignments, topical discussions, group projects and regular reading checks take the place of traditional tests. In lieu of a midterm or final exam, students will be expected to complete a major individual project each term. The weekly assignments often rely on a multimedia component. In addition, students will be expected to access and analyze real oceanographic data which may require the use of a spreadsheet program such as Excel. Writing assignments range from informal discussions to formal lab reports and term papers that include appropriate citations. The course is fast-paced and rigorous but would still be suitable for a highly-motivated eighth grader. No prior knowledge of oceanography is expected.
Scott Dickison
Rogers High School


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Course Title: Parenting in the 21st Century Section LJ
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Whether you are currently a parent or a parent-to-be, it is quite likely that at some time in the future you will be faced with the reality of having children. Unlike so many other important situations in life, most of us are not particularly well prepared for this crucial role. "Parenting in the 21st Century" helps you begin the lifelong process of learning about child development and parenting as well as explore available community resources for parenting in the contemporary world.

*9th grade students may enroll in this course with the written permission of a parent or guardian*Lisa Jordan
Two Rivers Magnet Middle School


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Course Title: Parenting in the 21st Century Section SM
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Whether you are currently a parent or a parent-to-be, it is quite likely that at some time in the future you will be faced with the reality of having children. Unlike so many other important situations in life, most of us are not particularly well prepared for this crucial role. "Parenting in the 21st Century" helps you begin the lifelong process of learning about child development and parenting as well as explore available community resources for parenting in the contemporary world.

*9th grade students may enroll in this course with the written permission of a parent or guardian*Sharon Mattingly
Marlborough High School


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Course Title: Peacemaking Section KJ
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Familiarity with keyboarding and the internet. An inquiring spirit.
Description: Peacemaking is about power. It is about realizing and utilizing your personal power, by recognizing that there are alternatives to violence and to a "win-lose" philosophy of life. Peacemaking is an active process, not a passive exercise.

Peacemaking is an interdisciplinary course exploring Peace and Peacemaking in four interrelated ways - the personal, interpersonal, communal and global. Through exploration, evaluation, reflection and discussion we will better understand our own roles and responsibilities as peacemakers. Topics covered will include: service for the sake of peace, forgiveness, understanding, contemplation, philosophies of non-violence, and peacemakers past and present among the Nobel Peace Prize Laureates. Readings include works by Thich Nhat Hanh, Martin Luther King, The 14th Dalai Lama, Mohandas Gandhi, Simon Wiesenthal and others. Projects will include a Peace Offering and creation of a multimedia project: assembling Pieces of Peace.

Discussion will be open and spirited. Join the process. I strongly believe that learning is a collaborative process.Kristen Jensen
Ursuline Academy


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Course Title: Pearl Harbor and the Pacific Theater Section DF
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability and willingness to read 25-50 pages a week and to interview participants in this conflict electronically and in person. Students may also be asked to rent 1-2 movies for viewing during the course of the class.
Description: World War II was the greatest war in history. Never before has the cause of liberty and the principles of democracy been tested to such an extent. Tom Brokaw, in his most recent book, describes the men that fought in this war and the women that supported them as "the greatest generation." History perhaps, has never seen two such contrasting sides and ideologies in such a massive conflict- truly a world war. For the United States this war involved a massive effort on two fronts with the defeat of Germany and Italy getting priority in both men and material. Yet the Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen in the Pacific made do with what they had and fought across incredible distances and hostile terrain to defeat the Japanese in their own "back yard." This war has shaped so much of our world today; that it is truly necessary to understand what happened almost 60 years ago to understand the present.

This class will examine the war in the Pacific Theater, examining the attack on Pearl Harbor and the lessons we can learn from it, the desperate struggles of the Coral Sea, Midway and Guadalcanal during the opening months of the war and then follow Nimitz and MacArthur as they island hop across the Pacific to Iwo Jima, Okinawa and to the very doorstep of Japan itself. We will conclude with a study of the decision to drop the atomic bomb and how that has shaped our world today.

The class will require reading multiple chapters within a week’s time and students will need to dedicate sufficient time to class discussions.David Farrell
Swansea Public Schools


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Course Title: Pearl Harbor and the Pacific Theater Section LT
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability and willingness to read 25-50 pages a week and to interview participants in this conflict electronically and in person. Students may also be asked to rent 1-2 movies for viewing during the course of the class.
Description: World War II was the greatest war in history. Never before has the cause of liberty and the principles of democracy been tested to such an extent. Tom Brokaw, in his most recent book, describes the men that fought in this war and the women that supported them as "the greatest generation." History perhaps, has never seen two such contrasting sides and ideologies in such a massive conflict- truly a world war. For the United States this war involved a massive effort on two fronts with the defeat of Germany and Italy getting priority in both men and material. Yet the Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen in the Pacific made do with what they had and fought across incredible distances and hostile terrain to defeat the Japanese in their own "back yard." This war has shaped so much of our world today; that it is truly necessary to understand what happened almost 60 years ago to understand the present.

This class will examine the war in the Pacific Theater, examining the attack on Pearl Harbor and the lessons we can learn from it, the desperate struggles of the Coral Sea, Midway and Guadalcanal during the opening months of the war and then follow Nimitz and MacArthur as they island hop across the Pacific to Iwo Jima, Okinawa and to the very doorstep of Japan itself. We will conclude with a study of the decision to drop the atomic bomb and how that has shaped our world today.

The class will require reading multiple chapters within a week’s time and students will need to dedicate sufficient time to class discussions.Lesley Thomson
Barnegat High School


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Course Title: Personal Finance Private Offering
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Cincinnati Prep**

What would you do with one million dollars? Spend it? Save it? Buy a Porsche, travel, shop till you drop, give to charity? You will earn over a million dollars in your lifetime and you can choose to do whatever you want with it. Where will it go?

Learn:
* how to make a budget
* the value of one cent
* how to date without going broke
* purchase an automobile
* purchase insurance ¡V auto, home, medical
* set short, medium, and long term financial goals
* to pay yourself first
* shop for a financial institution
* investing basics
* and much more . . .

Start now using your allowance or your part-time job and prepare for the future. Learn how to have all the money you need today and tomorrow - take Personal Finance.Dorothy Maxwell
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


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Course Title: Personal Finance Section BD
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: What would you do with one million dollars? Spend it? Save it? Buy a Porsche, travel, shop till you drop, give to charity? You will earn over a million dollars in your lifetime and you can choose to do whatever you want with it. Where will it go?

Learn:
* how to make a budget
* the value of one cent
* how to date without going broke
* purchase an automobile
* purchase insurance ¡V auto, home, medical
* set short, medium, and long term financial goals
* to pay yourself first
* shop for a financial institution
* investing basics
* and much more . . .

Start now using your allowance or your part-time job and prepare for the future. Learn how to have all the money you need today and tomorrow - take Personal Finance.Beth Donovan
Falmouth High School


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Course Title: Personal Finance Section DH
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: What would you do with one million dollars? Spend it? Save it? Buy a Porsche, travel, shop till you drop, give to charity? You will earn over a million dollars in your lifetime and you can choose to do whatever you want with it. Where will it go?

Learn:
* the value of one cent
* how to make a budget
* how to date without going broke
* purchase an automobile
* purchase insurance: auto, home, medical
* to set short, medium, and long term financial goals
* to pay yourself first
* to shop for a financial institution
* investing basics
* and much more . . .

Start now using your allowance or your part-time job and prepare for the future. Learn how to have all the money you need today and tomorrow - take Personal Finance.Debra Hoyt
Spaulding High School


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Course Title: Personal Finance Section DW
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: What would you do with one million dollars? Spend it? Save it? Buy a Porsche, travel, shop till you drop, give to charity? You will earn over a million dollars in your lifetime and you can choose to do whatever you want with it. Where will it go?

Learn:
* how to make a budget
* the value of one cent
* how to date without going broke
* purchase an automobile
* purchase insurance ¡V auto, home, medical
* set short, medium, and long term financial goals
* to pay yourself first
* shop for a financial institution
* investing basics
* and much more . . .

Start now using your allowance or your part-time job and prepare for the future. Learn how to have all the money you need today and tomorrow - take Personal Finance.Denise Wood
Groveton High School


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Course Title: Personal Finance Section HM
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: What would you do with one million dollars? Spend it? Save it? Buy a Porsche, travel, shop till you drop, give to charity? You will earn over a million dollars in your lifetime and you can choose to do whatever you want with it. Where will it go?

Learn:
* the value of one cent
* how to make a budget
* how to date without going broke
* purchase an automobile
* purchase insurance: auto, home, medical
* to set short, medium, and long term financial goals
* to pay yourself first
* to shop for a financial institution
* investing basics
* and much more . . .

Start now using your allowance or your part-time job and prepare for the future. Learn how to have all the money you need today and tomorrow - take Personal Finance.Hugh Mclaughlin
Watertown MA High School


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Course Title: Personal Finance Section MM
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: What would you do with one million dollars? Spend it? Save it? Buy a Porsche, travel, shop till you drop, give to charity? You will earn over a million dollars in your lifetime and you can choose to do whatever you want with it. Where will it go?

Learn:
* how to make a budget
* the value of one cent
* how to date without going broke
* purchase an automobile
* purchase insurance ¡V auto, home, medical
* set short, medium, and long term financial goals
* to pay yourself first
* shop for a financial institution
* investing basics
* and much more . . .

Start now using your allowance or your part-time job and prepare for the future. Learn how to have all the money you need today and tomorrow - take Personal Finance.Dorothy Maxwell
Central High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Personal Finance Section MM
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: What would you do with one million dollars? Spend it? Save it? Buy a Porsche, travel, shop till you drop, give to charity? You will earn over a million dollars in your lifetime and you can choose to do whatever you want with it. Where will it go?

Learn:
* how to make a budget
* the value of one cent
* how to date without going broke
* purchase an automobile
* purchase insurance ¡V auto, home, medical
* set short, medium, and long term financial goals
* to pay yourself first
* shop for a financial institution
* investing basics
* and much more . . .

Start now using your allowance or your part-time job and prepare for the future. Learn how to have all the money you need today and tomorrow - take Personal Finance.Marcia Morris
Central High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Personal Finance Section SC
Discipline: Business
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None
Description:
What would you do with one million dollars? Spend it? Save it? Buy a Porsche, travel, shop till you drop, give to charity? You will earn over a million dollars in your lifetime and you can choose to do whatever you want with it. Where will it go?

Learn:
* how to make a budget
* the value of one cent
* how to date without going broke
* purchase an automobile
* purchase insurance ¡V auto, home, medical
* set short, medium, and long term financial goals
* to pay yourself first
* shop for a financial institution
* investing basics
* and much more . . .

Start now using your allowance or your part-time job and prepare for the future. Learn how to have all the money you need today and tomorrow - take Personal Finance.Stephanie Chudyk
Paramus High School


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Course Title: Perspectives in Health Section CB
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: This course will examine the connections between physical, mental, and social health, and their impact on our lives. Students will reflect on lifestyle choices that they have made and how these choices may affect their lives. Much of the course is devoted to current health issues, especially those facing high school and post-secondary students. The course will offer discussions and course work on the topics such as nutrition, eating disorders, maintaining your body, cancer, school social health, the media's role in presenting health issues, and many others. Some topics of study are determined by student input and interest. Students are encouraged to moderate a discussion during the course.

You will examine health concepts by reading about them in the material provided to you as well as completing online Work Assignments and CourseRoom discussions. The activities and readings will vary each week. Other activities will include searching the Internet for information on the concepts, finding national and world perspectives on health issues through online media outlets, discovering local perspectives on concepts by searching your area newspapers on line, interviewing people within your own home community and taking part in discussions with your classmates on issues related to the health concepts. Individual and group work will be involved.

A portion of this course will involve discussions and assignments related to sexuality. This material will be covered in both the context of physical and social health in a bias free manner. Students who are not permitted to study sexuality, or who are uncomfortable with this topic are encouraged to request alternative assignments.

The grading will be based on an electronic portfolio of written work, discussion participation, and assignments.Carol Bardon
Ludlow High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Perspectives in Health Section DF
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: This course will examine the connections between physical, mental, and social health, and their impact on our lives. Students will reflect on lifestyle choices that they have made and how these choices may affect their lives. Much of the course is devoted to current health issues, especially those facing high school and post-secondary students. The course will offer discussions and course work on the topics such as nutrition, eating disorders, maintaining your body, cancer, school social health, the media's role in presenting health issues, and many others. Some topics of study are determined by student input and interest. Students are encouraged to moderate a discussion during the course.

You will examine health concepts by reading about them in the material provided to you as well as completing online Work Assignments and CourseRoom discussions. The activities and readings will vary each week. Other activities will include searching the Internet for information on the concepts, finding national and world perspectives on health issues through online media outlets, discovering local perspectives on concepts by searching your area newspapers on line, interviewing people within your own home community and taking part in discussions with your classmates on issues related to the health concepts. Individual and group work will be involved.

A portion of this course will involve discussions and assignments related to sexuality. This material will be covered in both the context of physical and social health in a bias free manner. Students who are not permitted to study sexuality, or who are uncomfortable with this topic are encouraged to request alternative assignments.

The grading will be based on an electronic portfolio of written work, discussion participation, and assignments.David Fleming
Brentwood School


* - - - *

Course Title: Perspectives in Health Section DK
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: This course will examine the connections between physical, mental, and social health, and their impact on our lives. Students will reflect on lifestyle choices that they have made and how these choices may affect their lives. Much of the course is devoted to current health issues, especially those facing high school and post-secondary students. The course will offer discussions and course work on the topics such as nutrition, eating disorders, maintaining your body, cancer, school social health, the media's role in presenting health issues, and many others. Some topics of study are determined by student input and interest. Students are encouraged to moderate a discussion during the course.

You will examine health concepts by reading about them in the material provided to you as well as completing online Work Assignments and CourseRoom discussions. The activities and readings will vary each week. Other activities will include searching the Internet for information on the concepts, finding national and world perspectives on health issues through online media outlets, discovering local perspectives on concepts by searching your area newspapers on line, interviewing people within your own home community and taking part in discussions with your classmates on issues related to the health concepts. Individual and group work will be involved.

A portion of this course will involve discussions and assignments related to sexuality. This material will be covered in both the context of physical and social health in a bias free manner. Students who are not permitted to study sexuality, or who are uncomfortable with this topic are encouraged to request alternative assignments.

The grading will be based on an electronic portfolio of written work, discussion participation, and assignments.David Keir
Smith Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Perspectives in Health Section DK2
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: This course will examine the connections between physical, mental, and social health, and their impact on our lives. Students will reflect on lifestyle choices that they have made and how these choices may affect their lives. Much of the course is devoted to current health issues, especially those facing high school and post-secondary students. The course will offer discussions and course work on the topics such as nutrition, eating disorders, maintaining your body, cancer, school social health, the media's role in presenting health issues, and many others. Some topics of study are determined by student input and interest. Students are encouraged to moderate a discussion during the course.

You will examine health concepts by reading about them in the material provided to you as well as completing online Work Assignments and CourseRoom discussions. The activities and readings will vary each week. Other activities will include searching the Internet for information on the concepts, finding national and world perspectives on health issues through online media outlets, discovering local perspectives on concepts by searching your area newspapers on line, interviewing people within your own home community and taking part in discussions with your classmates on issues related to the health concepts. Individual and group work will be involved.

A portion of this course will involve discussions and assignments related to sexuality. This material will be covered in both the context of physical and social health in a bias free manner. Students who are not permitted to study sexuality, or who are uncomfortable with this topic are encouraged to request alternative assignments.

The grading will be based on an electronic portfolio of written work, discussion participation, and assignments.David Keir
Collaborative for Educational Services


* - - - *

Course Title: Perspectives in Health Section LH
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: This course will examine the connections between physical, mental, and social health, and their impact on our lives. Students will reflect on lifestyle choices that they have made and how these choices may affect their lives. Much of the course is devoted to current health issues, especially those facing high school and post-secondary students. The course will offer discussions and course work on the topics such as nutrition, eating disorders, maintaining your body, cancer, school social health, the media's role in presenting health issues, and many others. Some topics of study are determined by student input and interest. Students are encouraged to moderate a discussion during the course.

You will examine health concepts by reading about them in the material provided to you as well as completing online Work Assignments and CourseRoom discussions. The activities and readings will vary each week. Other activities will include searching the Internet for information on the concepts, finding national and world perspectives on health issues through online media outlets, discovering local perspectives on concepts by searching your area newspapers on line, interviewing people within your own home community and taking part in discussions with your classmates on issues related to the health concepts. Individual and group work will be involved.

A portion of this course will involve discussions and assignments related to sexuality. This material will be covered in both the context of physical and social health in a bias free manner. Students who are not permitted to study sexuality, or who are uncomfortable with this topic are encouraged to request alternative assignments.

The grading will be based on an electronic portfolio of written work, discussion participation, and assignments.Leeanna Horn
Dubois High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Philosophy I
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: In this course you are invited to participate in an activity that is about 2 500 years old and you are expected to develop your own ideas about the philosophical problems, theories and arguments. You will be challenged to think critically on your own, but always taking into consideration what the others had and have to say about those matters.
Philosophy enhances the improvement of the analysis of personal convictions, the understanding of the diversity of arguments of others and the awareness of the limited character of our knowledge. In this sense, philosophy is a basic and important part of education and an instrument for making democratic life deeper.
As a participant in this philosophy course you will be challenged to think critically and learn to think with the ideas and points of view of past and contemporary philosophers. You can expect to write, read and debate extensively, always by means of an argumentative discourse and weekly assignments.

There is no media kit for this class. All texts and materials can be found or downloaded from the internetSofia Alexandre
Hudson High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Philosophy I Section GD1
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description:
In this course you are invited to participate in an activity that is about 2 500 years old and you are expected to develop your own ideas about the philosophical problems, theories and arguments. You will be challenged to think critically on your own, but always taking into consideration what the others had and have to say about those matters.
Philosophy enhances the improvement of the analysis of personal convictions, the understanding of the diversity of arguments of others and the awareness of the limited character of our knowledge. In this sense, philosophy is a basic and important part of education and an instrument for making democratic life deeper.
As a participant in this philosophy course you will be challenged to think critically and learn to think with the ideas and points of view of past and contemporary philosophers. You can expect to write, read and debate extensively, always by means of an argumentative discourse and weekly assignments.

There is no media kit for this class. All texts and materials can be found or downloaded from the internetGwen Duralek
Franklin NJ High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Philosophy I Section GP
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: In this course you are invited to participate in an activity that is about 2 500 years old and you are expected to develop your own ideas about the philosophical problems, theories and arguments. You will be challenged to think critically on your own, but always taking into consideration what the others had and have to say about those matters.
Philosophy enhances the improvement of the analysis of personal convictions, the understanding of the diversity of arguments of others and the awareness of the limited character of our knowledge. In this sense, philosophy is a basic and important part of education and an instrument for making democratic life deeper.
As a participant in this philosophy course you will be challenged to think critically and learn to think with the ideas and points of view of past and contemporary philosophers. You can expect to write, read and debate extensively, always by means of an argumentative discourse and weekly assignments.

There is no media kit for this class. All texts and materials can be found or downloaded from the internetGary Pearlz
Shanghai American School - Puxi Campus


* - - - *

Course Title: Philosophy I Section JM
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: In this course you are invited to participate in an activity that is about 2 500 years old and you are expected to develop your own ideas about the philosophical problems, theories and arguments. You will be challenged to think critically on your own, but always taking into consideration what the others had and have to say about those matters.
Philosophy enhances the improvement of the analysis of personal convictions, the understanding of the diversity of arguments of others and the awareness of the limited character of our knowledge. In this sense, philosophy is a basic and important part of education and an instrument for making democratic life deeper.
As a participant in this philosophy course you will be challenged to think critically and learn to think with the ideas and points of view of past and contemporary philosophers. You can expect to write, read and debate extensively, always by means of an argumentative discourse and weekly assignments.

There is no media kit for this class. All texts and materials can be found or downloaded from the internetJohn McGuinness
Nantucket High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Philosophy I Section PB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: In this course you are invited to participate in an activity that is about 2 500 years old and you are expected to develop your own ideas about the philosophical problems, theories and arguments. You will be challenged to think critically on your own, but always taking into consideration what the others had and have to say about those matters.
Philosophy enhances the improvement of the analysis of personal convictions, the understanding of the diversity of arguments of others and the awareness of the limited character of our knowledge. In this sense, philosophy is a basic and important part of education and an instrument for making democratic life deeper.
As a participant in this philosophy course you will be challenged to think critically and learn to think with the ideas and points of view of past and contemporary philosophers. You can expect to write, read and debate extensively, always by means of an argumentative discourse and weekly assignments.

There is no media kit for this class. All texts and materials can be found or downloaded from the internetPeter Bouley
Branford High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Physics Honors Section CW: An Introduction
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra (geometry helpful but not necessary),
All materials are available in the course or online; however, students who wish to have a supplementary book should have access to any standard school physics text
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Integrated Mechanical Physics with Logical Reasoning" should not take this course.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
So you plan to go to college and study physics, math, or engineering? DO THIS FIRST! This course will teach you HOW to figure out problems and how to judge whether or not your answers are reasonable. Save yourself a lot of time and trouble! This course will serve as an introduction to mechanical physics and the reasoning and problem-solving approaches utilized in physics, math and engineering disciplines. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving approaches and on developing the student's ability to grasp the 'overall picture' of a problems in order to estimate and evaluate reasonable outcomes.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Christopher Waring
Lake Region Union High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Physics Honors Section CW: An Introduction
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra (geometry helpful but not necessary),
All materials are available in the course or online; however, students who wish to have a supplementary book should have access to any standard school physics text
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Integrated Mechanical Physics with Logical Reasoning" should not take this course.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
So you plan to go to college and study physics, math, or engineering? DO THIS FIRST! This course will teach you HOW to figure out problems and how to judge whether or not your answers are reasonable. Save yourself a lot of time and trouble! This course will serve as an introduction to mechanical physics and the reasoning and problem-solving approaches utilized in physics, math and engineering disciplines. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving approaches and on developing the student's ability to grasp the 'overall picture' of a problems in order to estimate and evaluate reasonable outcomes.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Christopher Waring
Lake Region Union High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Physics Honors Section GM: An Introduction
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra (geometry helpful but not necessary),
All materials are available in the course or online; however, students who wish to have a supplementary book should have access to any standard school physics text
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Integrated Mechanical Physics with Logical Reasoning" should not take this course.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
So you plan to go to college and study physics, math, or engineering? DO THIS FIRST! This course will teach you HOW to figure out problems and how to judge whether or not your answers are reasonable. Save yourself a lot of time and trouble! This course will serve as an introduction to mechanical physics and the reasoning and problem-solving approaches utilized in physics, math and engineering disciplines. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving approaches and on developing the student's ability to grasp the 'overall picture' of a problems in order to estimate and evaluate reasonable outcomes.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Gary Menin
Virtual High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Physics Honors Section GM: An Introduction
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Algebra (geometry helpful but not necessary),
All materials are available in the course or online; however, students who wish to have a supplementary book should have access to any standard school physics text
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Integrated Mechanical Physics with Logical Reasoning" should not take this course.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
So you plan to go to college and study physics, math, or engineering? DO THIS FIRST! This course will teach you HOW to figure out problems and how to judge whether or not your answers are reasonable. Save yourself a lot of time and trouble! This course will serve as an introduction to mechanical physics and the reasoning and problem-solving approaches utilized in physics, math and engineering disciplines. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving approaches and on developing the student's ability to grasp the 'overall picture' of a problems in order to estimate and evaluate reasonable outcomes.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Gary Menin
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Physics Honors Section LM: An Introduction
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Algebra (geometry helpful but not necessary),
All materials are available in the course or online; however, students who wish to have a supplementary book should have access to any standard school physics text
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Integrated Mechanical Physics with Logical Reasoning" should not take this course.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
So you plan to go to college and study physics, math, or engineering? DO THIS FIRST! This course will teach you HOW to figure out problems and how to judge whether or not your answers are reasonable. Save yourself a lot of time and trouble! This course will serve as an introduction to mechanical physics and the reasoning and problem-solving approaches utilized in physics, math and engineering disciplines. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving approaches and on developing the student's ability to grasp the 'overall picture' of a problems in order to estimate and evaluate reasonable outcomes.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Lance Miller
Eugene Public School District 4J


* - - - *,
Course Title: Physics Honors Section LM: An Introduction
Discipline: Science - Physics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Algebra (geometry helpful but not necessary),
All materials are available in the course or online; however, students who wish to have a supplementary book should have access to any standard school physics text
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Integrated Mechanical Physics with Logical Reasoning" should not take this course.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
So you plan to go to college and study physics, math, or engineering? DO THIS FIRST! This course will teach you HOW to figure out problems and how to judge whether or not your answers are reasonable. Save yourself a lot of time and trouble! This course will serve as an introduction to mechanical physics and the reasoning and problem-solving approaches utilized in physics, math and engineering disciplines. Emphasis will be placed on problem-solving approaches and on developing the student's ability to grasp the 'overall picture' of a problems in order to estimate and evaluate reasonable outcomes.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Lance Miller
Eugene Public School District 4J


* - - - *

Course Title: Planning for College Summer Offering
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites:
Description: This four-week summer session course will teach you college planning skills and help you prepare for the college application process. Topics to be covered include the following:

· Reading and discussing important college planning topics with students globally in an online learning environment.
· Exploring a variety of college options including the two-year college, the four-year college, and the career and technical college.
· Researching colleges online to learn about the diverse offerings available to students.
· Participating in activities to gain further insight into career and personality interests when considering a college.
· Identifying specific skill sets to assist in providing a positive individual fit for a potential college.
· Learning about the important pieces of the college application process including a college essay, a resume, and a cover letter to accompany a college application.
· Developing an awareness of the role testing plays in the college application process.

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.Dorothy Maxwell
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Poetry Reading and Writing
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Interested in poetry, but don't really understand it? Tried writing it and really liked it? This course will deepen your understanding of American poetry, make you a better poet, and prepare you for studying this most enriching of art forms beyond the usual high school English class. In this course we will read, discuss, and write about American poetry after the Second World War, focusing largely on poets---avant-garde and formal---who are living and writing today. Course work will consist of readings in poetry and criticism, discussions, short written analytical responses, imitative poems, formal essays, and group presentations.
Gary Whitehead
Tenafly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Poetry Writing Section RP
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: If you enjoy writing about your life, then this is the course for you!

We'll spend the semester creating numerous poems, three short stories, and one essay - all based on your opinions, experiences, and viewpoints. You will have the opportunity to improve writing skills in a setting that welcomes everyone.

Writing assignments will be inspired by selections from contemporary American authors such as Maya Angelou, O'Henry, Gary Soto, Sherman Alexie, Sandra Cisneros, Martin Luther King Jr., Barbara Kingsolver, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, as well as poetry written by other high school students.

To enhance and inspire the writing process, students will complete weekly journal writing, and participate in a readers' forum where we will share writing and opinions in a friendly atmosphere. Together we will build a reference section where students can develop skills in the mechanics, usage, and grammar of the English language. You will have the opportunity to seek publication for your work.

The purpose of this class is to learn core English skills based on Washington State's Essential Academic Learning Requirements. Its theme is the celebration of diversity. Students at all levels will have the opportunity to improve their skills while writing about a topic that they know best: themselves.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Rosemary Pagliaro
Shelton Public Schools


* - - - *

Course Title: Poetry Writing Section TD
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: If you enjoy writing about your life, then this is the course for you!

We'll spend the semester creating numerous poems, three short stories, and one essay - all based on your opinions, experiences, and viewpoints. You will have the opportunity to improve writing skills in a setting that welcomes everyone.

Writing assignments will be inspired by selections from contemporary American authors such as Maya Angelou, O'Henry, Gary Soto, Sherman Alexie, Sandra Cisneros, Martin Luther King Jr., Barbara Kingsolver, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, as well as poetry written by other high school students.

To enhance and inspire the writing process, students will complete weekly journal writing, and participate in a readers' forum where we will share writing and opinions in a friendly atmosphere. Together we will build a reference section where students can develop skills in the mechanics, usage, and grammar of the English language. You will have the opportunity to seek publication for your work.

The purpose of this class is to learn core English skills based on Washington State's Essential Academic Learning Requirements. Its theme is the celebration of diversity. Students at all levels will have the opportunity to improve their skills while writing about a topic that they know best: themselves.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Theresa De Riso
Lincoln High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Portuguese I Section EF
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: Around two hundred million people speak Portuguese. And you? Are you interested in learning Portuguese and surfing the virtual Portuguese world? Then this the the course for you. Not only will you be able to begin communicating in Portuguese, but you will also gain an insight into the cultural aspects of Portugal and other Portuguese-speaking countries. You will be exposed to introductory different forms of written and spoken Portuguese and we will take virtual tours of Portuguese cities and interesting regions of Portuguese-speaking countries. When you want to chat with your cyber friends you can meet them informally at our virtual café (as many Portuguese speakers do at sidewalk cafés).

The primary goal of this course is to engage you in the real world challenge of getting acquainted with the Portuguese language and culture and, therefore, to develop the abilities to communicate and to think in Portuguese. Our practice with the Portuguese language will mainly involve skills of listening and speaking, but also reading and writing. Introductory knowledge of the Portuguese people, language and culture will certainly be a focal point in this course. We will also explore Portuguese language and cultural influence throughout the world, while instilling attitudes such as those of curiosity and respect for the convictions of others.

So… what will we be doing over the next 33 weeks? Each week of this course is organized around a major theme, which is reflected in the week's title. You will also find some activities that are repeated throughout the course. You will write a weekly journal, participate in weekly discussions, listen to online music, complete online grammar activities and engage in some group and individual projects. You will interact with your classmates through group projects like debates, webquests, and student led discussions.Elvio Ferreira
Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Portuguese I Section VD
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: Around two hundred million people speak Portuguese. And you? Are you interested in learning Portuguese and surfing the virtual Portuguese world? Then this the the course for you. Not only will you be able to begin communicating in Portuguese, but you will also gain an insight into the cultural aspects of Portugal and other Portuguese-speaking countries. You will be exposed to introductory different forms of written and spoken Portuguese and we will take virtual tours of Portuguese cities and interesting regions of Portuguese-speaking countries. When you want to chat with your cyber friends you can meet them informally at our virtual café (as many Portuguese speakers do at sidewalk cafés).

The primary goal of this course is to engage you in the real world challenge of getting acquainted with the Portuguese language and culture and, therefore, to develop the abilities to communicate and to think in Portuguese. Our practice with the Portuguese language will mainly involve skills of listening and speaking, but also reading and writing. Introductory knowledge of the Portuguese people, language and culture will certainly be a focal point in this course. We will also explore Portuguese language and cultural influence throughout the world, while instilling attitudes such as those of curiosity and respect for the convictions of others.

So… what will we be doing over the next 33 weeks? Each week of this course is organized around a major theme, which is reflected in the week's title. You will also find some activities that are repeated throughout the course. You will write a weekly journal, participate in weekly discussions, listen to online music, complete online grammar activities and engage in some group and individual projects. You will interact with your classmates through group projects like debates, webquests, and student led discussions.Virginia Davis
St. Mary Academy Bay View


* - - - *

Course Title: Portuguese I Section VD2
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites: None
Description: Around two hundred million people speak Portuguese. And you? Are you interested in learning Portuguese and surfing the virtual Portuguese world? Then this the the course for you. Not only will you be able to begin communicating in Portuguese, but you will also gain an insight into the cultural aspects of Portugal and other Portuguese-speaking countries. You will be exposed to introductory different forms of written and spoken Portuguese and we will take virtual tours of Portuguese cities and interesting regions of Portuguese-speaking countries. When you want to chat with your cyber friends you can meet them informally at our virtual café (as many Portuguese speakers do at sidewalk cafés).

The primary goal of this course is to engage you in the real world challenge of getting acquainted with the Portuguese language and culture and, therefore, to develop the abilities to communicate and to think in Portuguese. Our practice with the Portuguese language will mainly involve skills of listening and speaking, but also reading and writing. Introductory knowledge of the Portuguese people, language and culture will certainly be a focal point in this course. We will also explore Portuguese language and cultural influence throughout the world, while instilling attitudes such as those of curiosity and respect for the convictions of others.

So… what will we be doing over the next 33 weeks? Each week of this course is organized around a major theme, which is reflected in the week's title. You will also find some activities that are repeated throughout the course. You will write a weekly journal, participate in weekly discussions, listen to online music, complete online grammar activities and engage in some group and individual projects. You will interact with your classmates through group projects like debates, webquests, and student led discussions.Virginia Davis
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Practical Law Section MC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: · This course explores practical and controversial topics of law which affect young
people in the United States.
· Start with the foundation of law in America, the United States Constitution.
· Learn how the criminal justice system works and participate in a mock trial.
· Debate timely and relevant issues in criminal law.
· Compare the juvenile justice system of various states.
· Discuss issues such as employment, consumer, and family law.
· Examine the civil rights protections that residents of the United States enjoy and
analyze what happens when these rights are infringed upon.

Note: Some controversial issues are of a mature nature and may not be suitable for all students.Michelle Crowley
Lewiston High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Practical Law Section NP
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: · This course explores practical and controversial topics of law which affect young
people in the United States.
· Start with the foundation of law in America, the United States Constitution.
· Learn how the criminal justice system works and participate in a mock trial.
· Debate timely and relevant issues in criminal law.
· Compare the juvenile justice system of various states.
· Discuss issues such as employment, consumer, and family law.
· Examine the civil rights protections that residents of the United States enjoy and
analyze what happens when these rights are infringed upon.

Note: Some controversial issues are of a mature nature and may not be suitable for all students.Nancy Power
Westborough High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Pre-Algebra/Algebra Preparation Summer Offering
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 09, 10
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites:
Description: This course will introduce students to core concepts and content needed in Algebra 1. It is appropriate for students who have either passed Algebra 1 but want some added practice before taking Algebra 2 or for students who will be taking Algebra 1 in the fall.

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.

Please note if the student is taking this course for credit recovery, it is advised that you check with the student's school to confirm that the topics covered (see course syllabus) match those required by the school. You may also want to confirm with the school the process for receiving credits, which may involve an assessment administered separately by the school.Amy Dyment
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Pre-Calculus I: Functions
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Student must have completed Algebra 2 and Geometry.
Description: Description:
This one semester Pre-Calculus/Functions course prepares students for eventual work in Calculus. The central focus of this course is functions:
· linear,
· exponential and logarithmic,
· polynomial and rational,
· discrete and continuous,
· inverses, graphs, and applications.

The course will include other topics from advanced mathematics such as analytic geometry and three-dimensional geometry. Students will develop skills in applying the concepts by solving real-world problems.

Graphing calculators are used frequently in each lesson to familiarize students with the basics of graphing calculator use, to demonstrate concepts, to facilitate problem solving, and to verify results of problems solved algebraically. SAT practice topics and problems provide a review of the prerequisite courses. Luke Cioffi
Bellows Free Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Pre-Calculus II: Advanced Trigonometry
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Student must have completed Algebra 2 and Geometry.
Description: This one semester Pre-Calculus/Advanced Trig course prepares students for eventual work in Calculus. Topics covered include:
· trigonometric and circular functions; their inverses and graphs;
· relations among the parts of a triangle;
· trigonometric identities and equations;
· solutions of right and oblique triangles and their applications to real-world problems.

Graphing calculators are used frequently in each lesson to familiarize students with the basics of graphing calculator use, to demonstrate concepts, to facilitate problem solving, and to verify results of problems solved algebraically. SAT practice topics and problems provide students a review of the prerequisite courses.
Michelle Cartagena
Burncoat High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Pre-Calculus II Section BK: Advanced Trigonometry
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Student must have completed Algebra 2 and Geometry.
Description: This one semester Pre-Calculus/Advanced Trig course prepares students for eventual work in Calculus. Topics covered include:
· trigonometric and circular functions; their inverses and graphs;
· relations among the parts of a triangle;
· trigonometric identities and equations;
· solutions of right and oblique triangles and their applications to real-world problems.

Graphing calculators are used frequently in each lesson to familiarize students with the basics of graphing calculator use, to demonstrate concepts, to facilitate problem solving, and to verify results of problems solved algebraically. SAT practice topics and problems provide students a review of the prerequisite courses.
Brian Kau
Eugene Public School District 4J


* - - - *

Course Title: Preparing for College Admissions and Financial Aid Private Offering Section DM
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites:
Description: **This is a private offering for students from Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy**

In this course we will investigate in as much detail as possible what is involved with pursuing a post secondary education. We will consider what kind of school is best for each individual student, what the costs are and how much of those costs others can be cajoled into paying. We will try to prepare students for the tests they will need to take, the forms they will need to fill out, and the academics they will need to pursue. As our world changes and education becomes more and more necessary to finding a meaningful place in the workforce the academic decisions we make take on greater significance. As our economy changes it is not just that we need the skills a post-secondary education provides but also, in light of rapid changes in the nature of work, we also need the information gathering skills that post-secondary education provides. That is, we need not only to learn the profession we plan to pursue but how to learn a new profession if the world of work moves beyond the profession we learned in college. Some see the future as a scary thing. I think the future is a challenging place and I also think challenge stimulates and invigorates us. In this light the future is an exciting place. But our ability to meet the challenges of the future is contingent on the skills we bring with us as we face that challenge. Hopefully this course will develop some of those skills and help find out where to go to get the help you need developing the skills this course does not address.Dorothy Maxwell
Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Preparing for College Admissions and Financial Aid Section JHW
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: In this course we will investigate in as much detail as possible what is involved with pursuing a post secondary education. We will consider what kind of school is best for each individual student, what the costs are and how much of those costs others can be cajoled into paying. We will try to prepare students for the tests they will need to take, the forms they will need to fill out, and the academics they will need to pursue. As our world changes and education becomes more and more necessary to finding a meaningful place in the workforce the academic decisions we make take on greater significance. As our economy changes it is not just that we need the skills a post-secondary education provides but also, in light of rapid changes in the nature of work, we also need the information gathering skills that post-secondary education provides. That is, we need not only to learn the profession we plan to pursue but how to learn a new profession if the world of work moves beyond the profession we learned in college. Some see the future as a scary thing. I think the future is a challenging place and I also think challenge stimulates and invigorates us. In this light the future is an exciting place. But our ability to meet the challenges of the future is contingent on the skills we bring with us as we face that challenge. Hopefully this course will develop some of those skills and help find out where to go to get the help you need developing the skills this course does not address.Janet Harriman-Wicks
WMEC


* - - - *

Course Title: Preveterinary Medicine Section LK
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description:

Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian or a veterinary technician? Do you love animals and wish to learn more about them? Preveterinary Medicine will introduce you to basic vertebrate anatomy by covering the major systems of the body including the digestive, reproductive, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, and integumentary systems. We will use examples from small animal medicine (dogs and cats although some large animal anatomy will be covered) and discuss medical problems that are commonly seen in veterinary offices. Every week we will have a "Dilemma of the Week" where I will introduce common ethical dilemmas that veterinarians face on a regular basis, and you will discuss these issues with your classmates.

Following the introduction to anatomy and physiology, you will learn the diagnostic procedures that assist veterinarians in making appropriate diagnoses. You will learn how to take a medical history, perform a basic physical examination, and what types of tests (blood, Xray, fecals) that vets employ to get a better picture of the animal's health. For the remainder of the course, you will work in small groups on case studies. You will follow cases from start to completion, brainstorming about potential causes of ailments, diagnoses and treatment options.Lauren Kurzius
Manville High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Preveterinary Medicine Section SS
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian or a veterinary technician? Do you love animals and wish to learn more about them? Preveterinary Medicine will introduce you to basic vertebrate anatomy by covering the major systems of the body including the digestive, reproductive, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, and integumentary systems. We will use examples from small animal medicine (dogs and cats although some large animal anatomy will be covered) and discuss medical problems that are commonly seen in veterinary offices. Every week we will have a "Dilemma of the Week" where I will introduce common ethical dilemmas that veterinarians face on a regular basis, and you will discuss these issues with your classmates.

Following the introduction to anatomy and physiology, you will learn the diagnostic procedures that assist veterinarians in making appropriate diagnoses. You will learn how to take a medical history, perform a basic physical examination, and what types of tests (blood, Xray, fecals) that vets employ to get a better picture of the animal's health. For the remainder of the course, you will work in small groups on case studies. You will follow cases from start to completion, brainstorming about potential causes of ailments, diagnoses and treatment options.Stacey Savage
Northbridge High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Preveterinary Medicine Section TW
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description:

Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian or a veterinary technician? Do you love animals and wish to learn more about them? Preveterinary Medicine will introduce you to basic vertebrate anatomy by covering the major systems of the body including the digestive, reproductive, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, and integumentary systems. We will use examples from small animal medicine (dogs and cats although some large animal anatomy will be covered) and discuss medical problems that are commonly seen in veterinary offices. Every week we will have a "Dilemma of the Week" where I will introduce common ethical dilemmas that veterinarians face on a regular basis, and you will discuss these issues with your classmates.

Following the introduction to anatomy and physiology, you will learn the diagnostic procedures that assist veterinarians in making appropriate diagnoses. You will learn how to take a medical history, perform a basic physical examination, and what types of tests (blood, Xray, fecals) that vets employ to get a better picture of the animal's health. For the remainder of the course, you will work in small groups on case studies. You will follow cases from start to completion, brainstorming about potential causes of ailments, diagnoses and treatment options.Tamara Watson
Agawam High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Preveterinary Medicine Section VB
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of a full year (or equivalent) of biology
Description: Are you interested in becoming a veterinarian or a veterinary technician? Do you love animals and wish to learn more about them? Preveterinary Medicine will introduce you to basic vertebrate anatomy by covering the major systems of the body including the digestive, reproductive, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, and integumentary systems. We will use examples from small animal medicine (dogs and cats although some large animal anatomy will be covered) and discuss medical problems that are commonly seen in veterinary offices. Every week we will have a "Dilemma of the Week" where I will introduce common ethical dilemmas that veterinarians face on a regular basis, and you will discuss these issues with your classmates.

Following the introduction to anatomy and physiology, you will learn the diagnostic procedures that assist veterinarians in making appropriate diagnoses. You will learn how to take a medical history, perform a basic physical examination, and what types of tests (blood, Xray, fecals) that vets employ to get a better picture of the animal's health. For the remainder of the course, you will work in small groups on case studies. You will follow cases from start to completion, brainstorming about potential causes of ailments, diagnoses and treatment options.Valerie Bell
Nauset Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Programming in Visual Basic Section FM
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Knowledge of Windows Environment
Platform: PC
Software: Visual Basic Express 2010; instructions for installing and downloading the software are provided to students in the first week of class. The software is free and can be downloaded through this link:
http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/express.
Description: What are computers anyway but a pile of metal, plastic, and other objects? Yet, computers are capable of doing very fantastic things ranging from mundane calculations to exciting virtual reality. However, by their nature, computers are very "baby like." Yes, they need to be told how to do everything! It is the job of programmers to teach the computer how to do meaningful tasks. That's where you come in.

Many students may never take a course in programming because they think that they have to be great in math or science and shy away because they've heard that its too hard, just for boys, or too boring. They may miss a possible career path in Programming or Computer Science because they never took a chance by taking a programming course, listening to what they've heard instead of trying it for themselves.

This course is intended as an exploratory programming course using one of the best and easiest programming languages in the world today, Visual Basic. It's a graphically oriented language that allows for the easy construction of useful programs. Do well in this course and you may very well be tempted to take more advanced courses. An added benefit is this: You will have to think and use logic and creativity throughout the course. If you never program again in your life, the logic and creativity used in solving the course problems will transfer across many problems in other disciplines you may face. Although exploratory and non-threatening in nature, there is enough depth to give students a good feel for what programming is like. Students will be encouraged to experiment on their own.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Francis McSweeny
Stonington High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Programming in Visual Basic Section MF
Discipline: Technology/Tech Ed.
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Knowledge of Windows Environment
Platform: PC
Software: Visual Basic Express 2010; instructions for installing and downloading the software are provided to students in the first week of class. The software is free and can be downloaded through this link:
http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/products/2010-editions/express.
Description: What are computers anyway but a pile of metal, plastic, and other objects? Yet, computers are capable of doing very fantastic things ranging from mundane calculations to exciting virtual reality. However, by their nature, computers are very "baby like." Yes, they need to be told how to do everything! It is the job of programmers to teach the computer how to do meaningful tasks. That's where you come in.

Many students may never take a course in programming because they think that they have to be great in math or science and shy away because they've heard that its too hard, just for boys, or too boring. They may miss a possible career path in Programming or Computer Science because they never took a chance by taking a programming course, listening to what they've heard instead of trying it for themselves.

This course is intended as an exploratory programming course using one of the best and easiest programming languages in the world today, Visual Basic. It's a graphically oriented language that allows for the easy construction of useful programs. Do well in this course and you may very well be tempted to take more advanced courses. An added benefit is this: You will have to think and use logic and creativity throughout the course. If you never program again in your life, the logic and creativity used in solving the course problems will transfer across many problems in other disciplines you may face. Although exploratory and non-threatening in nature, there is enough depth to give students a good feel for what programming is like. Students will be encouraged to experiment on their own.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Marylou Francis
Academy of Notre Dame


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology Honors Section AS: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students will be required to submit attachments in Microsoft Word or Windows WordPad (.doc or .rtf files). Students will need access to a media player (Windows Media Player, RealPlayer, or Quicktime).
Students who don't have access to PowerPoint should download Microsoft's PowerPoint Viewer from their website so they can view PowerPoint Presentations throughout the class.

There is no media kit for this course. All materials are available online.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Psychology Introduction Honors is a course designed to prepare students for the study of psychology at the college level. The focus of the course will be on mastering necessary academic skills that will assist the student in furthering his/her study of the subject. Such skills include reading for understanding and note taking, critical thinking and problem solving, researching and writing, thesis statement writing and essay structure, etc. Basic psychology vocabulary terms are introduced, and content emphasis is placed on building the students’ background in the subject area so that he/she is prepared for an advanced course.Abbey Sacco
Bolton High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Psychology Honors Section AS: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students will be required to submit attachments in Microsoft Word or Windows WordPad (.doc or .rtf files). Students will need access to a media player (Windows Media Player, RealPlayer, or Quicktime).
Students who don't have access to PowerPoint should download Microsoft's PowerPoint Viewer from their website so they can view PowerPoint Presentations throughout the class.

There is no media kit for this course. All materials are available online.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Psychology Introduction Honors is a course designed to prepare students for the study of psychology at the college level. The focus of the course will be on mastering necessary academic skills that will assist the student in furthering his/her study of the subject. Such skills include reading for understanding and note taking, critical thinking and problem solving, researching and writing, thesis statement writing and essay structure, etc. Basic psychology vocabulary terms are introduced, and content emphasis is placed on building the students’ background in the subject area so that he/she is prepared for an advanced course.Abbey Sacco
Bolton High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology Honors Section CG: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students will be required to submit attachments in Microsoft Word or Windows WordPad (.doc or .rtf files). Students will need access to a media player (Windows Media Player, RealPlayer, or Quicktime).
Students who don't have access to PowerPoint should download Microsoft's PowerPoint Viewer from their website so they can view PowerPoint Presentations throughout the class.

There is no media kit for this course. All materials are available online.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Psychology Introduction Honors is a course designed to prepare students for the study of psychology at the college level. The focus of the course will be on mastering necessary academic skills that will assist the student in furthering his/her study of the subject. Such skills include reading for understanding and note taking, critical thinking and problem solving, researching and writing, thesis statement writing and essay structure, etc. Basic psychology vocabulary terms are introduced, and content emphasis is placed on building the students’ background in the subject area so that he/she is prepared for an advanced course.

Charleen Gribben
Norristown Area High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Psychology Honors Section CG: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students will be required to submit attachments in Microsoft Word or Windows WordPad (.doc or .rtf files). Students will need access to a media player (Windows Media Player, RealPlayer, or Quicktime).
Students who don't have access to PowerPoint should download Microsoft's PowerPoint Viewer from their website so they can view PowerPoint Presentations throughout the class.

There is no media kit for this course. All materials are available online.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Psychology Introduction Honors is a course designed to prepare students for the study of psychology at the college level. The focus of the course will be on mastering necessary academic skills that will assist the student in furthering his/her study of the subject. Such skills include reading for understanding and note taking, critical thinking and problem solving, researching and writing, thesis statement writing and essay structure, etc. Basic psychology vocabulary terms are introduced, and content emphasis is placed on building the students’ background in the subject area so that he/she is prepared for an advanced course.

Charleen Gribben
Norristown Area High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology Honors Section FS: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students will be required to submit attachments in Microsoft Word or Windows WordPad (.doc or .rtf files). Students will need access to a media player (Windows Media Player, RealPlayer, or Quicktime).
Students who don't have access to PowerPoint should download Microsoft's PowerPoint Viewer from their website so they can view PowerPoint Presentations throughout the class.

There is no media kit for this course. All materials are available online.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Psychology Introduction Honors is a course designed to prepare students for the study of psychology at the college level. The focus of the course will be on mastering necessary academic skills that will assist the student in furthering his/her study of the subject. Such skills include reading for understanding and note taking, critical thinking and problem solving, researching and writing, thesis statement writing and essay structure, etc. Basic psychology vocabulary terms are introduced, and content emphasis is placed on building the students’ background in the subject area so that he/she is prepared for an advanced course.Franklin Spangler
North College Hill High School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Psychology Honors Section FS: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students will be required to submit attachments in Microsoft Word or Windows WordPad (.doc or .rtf files). Students will need access to a media player (Windows Media Player, RealPlayer, or Quicktime).
Students who don't have access to PowerPoint should download Microsoft's PowerPoint Viewer from their website so they can view PowerPoint Presentations throughout the class.

There is no media kit for this course. All materials are available online.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Psychology Introduction Honors is a course designed to prepare students for the study of psychology at the college level. The focus of the course will be on mastering necessary academic skills that will assist the student in furthering his/her study of the subject. Such skills include reading for understanding and note taking, critical thinking and problem solving, researching and writing, thesis statement writing and essay structure, etc. Basic psychology vocabulary terms are introduced, and content emphasis is placed on building the students’ background in the subject area so that he/she is prepared for an advanced course.Franklin Spangler
North College Hill High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology Honors Section MC: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students will be required to submit attachments in Microsoft Word or Windows WordPad (.doc or .rtf files). Students who don't have access to PowerPoint should download Microsoft's PowerPoint Viewer from their website so they can view PowerPoint Presentations throughout the class.

There is no media kit for this course. All materials are available online.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Psychology Introduction Honors is a course designed to prepare students for the study of psychology at the college level. The focus of the course will be on mastering necessary academic skills that will assist the student in furthering his/her study of the subject. Such skills include reading for understanding and note taking, critical thinking and problem solving, researching and writing, thesis statement writing and essay structure, etc. Basic psychology vocabulary terms are introduced, and content emphasis is placed on building the students’ background in the subject area so that he/she is prepared for an advanced course.
Michael Campbell
Bellows Free Academy


* - - - *,
Course Title: Psychology Honors Section MC: An Introduction
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Students will be required to submit attachments in Microsoft Word or Windows WordPad (.doc or .rtf files). Students who don't have access to PowerPoint should download Microsoft's PowerPoint Viewer from their website so they can view PowerPoint Presentations throughout the class.

There is no media kit for this course. All materials are available online.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course.

Psychology Introduction Honors is a course designed to prepare students for the study of psychology at the college level. The focus of the course will be on mastering necessary academic skills that will assist the student in furthering his/her study of the subject. Such skills include reading for understanding and note taking, critical thinking and problem solving, researching and writing, thesis statement writing and essay structure, etc. Basic psychology vocabulary terms are introduced, and content emphasis is placed on building the students’ background in the subject area so that he/she is prepared for an advanced course.
Michael Campbell
Bellows Free Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology I Section AC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability and willingness to learn complicated concepts and apply them to your life; also, a "B" average or better in English is encouraged
Description: Psychology - An Introduction is really a class to introduce you to yourself! We'll be looking at various aspects of our psyche and see what makes us tick. Each student will be required to complete weekly journal entries and participate in daily class discussions.

Special attention will be given to operant and classical conditioning, psychological disorders and their treatments as well as human behavior and debunking myths about the paranormal and psychology in general. This introductory class is designed to very interactive with students sharing their reflections and personal thoughts with the rest of the class on a weekly basis.


*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Aaron Cornelius
Craftsbury Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology I Section DS
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability and willingness to learn complicated concepts and apply them to your life; also, a "B" average or better in English is encouraged
Description: Psychology - An Introduction is really a class to introduce you to yourself! We'll be looking at various aspects of our psyche and see what makes us tick. Each student will be required to complete weekly journal entries and participate in daily class discussions.

Special attention will be given to operant and classical conditioning, psychological disorders and their treatments as well as human behavior and debunking myths about the paranormal and psychology in general. This introductory class is designed to very interactive with students sharing their reflections and personal thoughts with the rest of the class on a weekly basis.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Dawn Erazmus
Nathan Hale-Ray High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology I Section HB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Ability and willingness to learn complicated concepts and apply them to your life; also, a "B" average or better in English is encouraged
Description: Psychology - An Introduction is really a class to introduce you to yourself! We'll be looking at various aspects of our psyche and see what makes us tick. Weekly journal entries will be required by each student.

Special attention will be given to operant and classical conditioning, psychological disorders and their treatments as well as human behavior and debunking myths about the paranormal and psychology in general. This introductory class is designed to very interactive with students sharing their reflections and personal thoughts with the rest of the class on a weekly basis.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Hera Butt
Public Safety Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology I Section NM
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability and willingness to learn complicated concepts and apply them to your life; also, a "B" average or better in English is encouraged
Description: Psychology - An Introduction is really a class to introduce you to yourself! We'll be looking at various aspects of our psyche and see what makes us tick. Weekly journal entries will be required by each student.

Special attention will be given to operant and classical conditioning, psychological disorders and their treatments as well as human behavior and debunking myths about the paranormal and psychology in general. This introductory class is designed to very interactive with students sharing their reflections and personal thoughts with the rest of the class on a weekly basis.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Nicole Miller
Westborough High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology I Section NM2
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Ability and willingness to learn complicated concepts and apply them to your life; also, a "B" average or better in English is encouraged
Description: Psychology - An Introduction is really a class to introduce you to yourself! We'll be looking at various aspects of our psyche and see what makes us tick. Weekly journal entries will be required by each student.

Special attention will be given to operant and classical conditioning, psychological disorders and their treatments as well as human behavior and debunking myths about the paranormal and psychology in general. This introductory class is designed to very interactive with students sharing their reflections and personal thoughts with the rest of the class on a weekly basis.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Nicole Miller
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology I Section PD
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability and willingness to learn complicated concepts and apply them to your life; also, a "B" average or better in English is encouraged
Description: Psychology - An Introduction is really a class to introduce you to yourself! We'll be looking at various aspects of our psyche and see what makes us tick. Each student will be required to complete weekly journal entries and participate in daily class discussions.

Special attention will be given to operant and classical conditioning, psychological disorders and their treatments as well as human behavior and debunking myths about the paranormal and psychology in general. This introductory class is designed to very interactive with students sharing their reflections and personal thoughts with the rest of the class on a weekly basis.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Peter Demello
Southwick-Tolland Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology of Crime Section EF
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Students will learn how psychology applies to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The course will include all aspects of the legal system including police, the trial and corrections. Topics will include: recovered memories, children as victims and offenders, violence and murder, strategies for interviewing witnesses, expert testimony, and factors influencing the credibility of witnesses, victims and offenders and insanity. Students will also examine the relationship of psychology and law in the educational and work settings.Elizabeth Ferns
Hudson High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology of Crime Section GW
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Students will learn how psychology applies to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The course will include all aspects of the legal system including police, the trial and corrections. Topics will include: recovered memories, children as victims and offenders, violence and murder, strategies for interviewing witnesses, expert testimony, and factors influencing the credibility of witnesses, victims and offenders and insanity. Students will also examine the relationship of psychology and law in the educational and work settings.Gene Ward
Saint Joseph Preparatory High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology of Crime Section JB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Students will learn how psychology applies to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The course will include all aspects of the legal system including police, the trial and corrections. Topics will include: recovered memories, children as victims and offenders, violence and murder, strategies for interviewing witnesses, expert testimony, and factors influencing the credibility of witnesses, victims and offenders and insanity. Students will also examine the relationship of psychology and law in the educational and work settings.JoAnn Byrn
Deming High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology of Crime Section JF
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites:
Description: Students will learn how psychology applies to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The course will include all aspects of the legal system including police, the trial and corrections. Topics will include: recovered memories, children as victims and offenders, violence and murder, strategies for interviewing witnesses, expert testimony, and factors influencing the credibility of witnesses, victims and offenders and insanity. Students will also examine the relationship of psychology and law in the educational and work settings.Judith Fairweather
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology of Crime Section JR
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Students will learn how psychology applies to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The course will include all aspects of the legal system including police, the trial and corrections. Topics will include: recovered memories, children as victims and offenders, violence and murder, strategies for interviewing witnesses, expert testimony, and factors influencing the credibility of witnesses, victims and offenders and insanity. Students will also examine the relationship of psychology and law in the educational and work settings.Jeffery Richards
Rockport High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology of Crime Section RB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Students will learn how psychology applies to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The course will include all aspects of the legal system including police, the trial and corrections. Topics will include: recovered memories, children as victims and offenders, violence and murder, strategies for interviewing witnesses, expert testimony, and factors influencing the credibility of witnesses, victims and offenders and insanity. Students will also examine the relationship of psychology and law in the educational and work settings.Rema Beiruti
New Bedford High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Psychology of Crime Section RF
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Students will learn how psychology applies to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The course will include all aspects of the legal system including police, the trial and corrections. Topics will include: recovered memories, children as victims and offenders, violence and murder, strategies for interviewing witnesses, expert testimony, and factors influencing the credibility of witnesses, victims and offenders and insanity. Students will also examine the relationship of psychology and law in the educational and work settings.Richard Fedoriska
Nativity B.V.M. High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Russian Language and Culture Section ET
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: An open mind and excitement to learn about a different culture, country, and way of life. The course is taught in English. It is designed for students whose English language skills are very strong. This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge of Russian is required.

Technology requirements: Students will need access to Power Point and RealPlayer, as well as Internet, including YouTube website. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students will also need to have the Russian language bar installed and activated. This is a free function of Windows XP.
Description: Russia is the largest country in the world! Even Russians cannot decide once and for all whether Russia belongs to Europe or Asia. Have you ever met a Russian? What do Russians love and what is their favorite pastime? What is the mysterious Russian soul? If you have never been to Russia or if you have already traveled there and want to know more – this course is for you.

I invite you on a 15-week-long journey across the globe and time to learn the basics of Russian language and culture. We will be learning survival Russian: from simple greetings and introductions to the ability to sustain a simple conversation in certain situations. Knowledge of Russian culture and its traditions will help you not only communicate better in Russian, but also avoid cultural misunderstandings. We will explore the culture, past and present: art, music, literature, traditions, holidays, history, and the people. We will tour the Hermitage State Museum in St. Petersburg and listen to Russian songs, plan an imaginary trip around the country and watch Mariinsky Theater Ballet performances, enjoy Russian rock and watch excerpts from Russian movies and cartoons.

As a native Russian speaker, born and raised in St. Petersburg, Russia, I will introduce you to the richness of Russian culture and language. As a young person, you will start communicating in elementary Russian, form and share your opinions and attitudes about Russia and its culture, and compare and analyze the differences and similarities between English and Russian languages. I almost guarantee you that you will want to go to Russia by the time we finish the course.Elizaveta Temidis
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Russian Language and Culture Section ET2
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: An open mind and excitement to learn about a different culture, country, and way of life. The course is taught in English. It is designed for students whose English language skills are very strong. This is an introductory course; no prior knowledge of Russian is required.

Technology requirements: Students will need access to Power Point and RealPlayer, as well as Internet, including YouTube website. This course requires students to have access to a computer with headphones, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Students will also need to have the Russian language bar installed and activated. This is a free function of Windows XP.
Description: Russia is the largest country in the world! Even Russians cannot decide once and for all whether Russia belongs to Europe or Asia. Have you ever met a Russian? What do Russians love and what is their favorite pastime? What is the mysterious Russian soul? If you have never been to Russia or if you have already traveled there and want to know more – this course is for you.

I invite you on a 15-week-long journey across the globe and time to learn the basics of Russian language and culture. We will be learning survival Russian: from simple greetings and introductions to the ability to sustain a simple conversation in certain situations. Knowledge of Russian culture and its traditions will help you not only communicate better in Russian, but also avoid cultural misunderstandings. We will explore the culture, past and present: art, music, literature, traditions, holidays, history, and the people. We will tour the Hermitage State Museum in St. Petersburg and listen to Russian songs, plan an imaginary trip around the country and watch Mariinsky Theater Ballet performances, enjoy Russian rock and watch excerpts from Russian movies and cartoons.

As a native Russian speaker, born and raised in St. Petersburg, Russia, I will introduce you to the richness of Russian culture and language. As a young person, you will start communicating in elementary Russian, form and share your opinions and attitudes about Russia and its culture, and compare and analyze the differences and similarities between English and Russian languages. I almost guarantee you that you will want to go to Russia by the time we finish the course.Elizaveta Temidis
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Screenwriting Fundamentals Section CO
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Have you ever had an idea that you thought would make a great movie? Most of us have, but it's a huge leap from a rough concept to a polished script. This course is designed to equip students with the theory and structure of screenwriting so that they may mold their ideas into a professional product designed for the screen. Emphasis is upon the literary conventions of the form -- character, conflict, plot, dialogue -- as well as the technical elements which make scripts and screenwriting unique. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to conceive, develop, and craft their own original idea into a professional screenplay.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Christopher O'reilly
Keene High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Screenwriting Fundamentals Section FH
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description:
Have you ever had an idea that you thought would make a great movie? Most of us have, but it's a huge leap from a rough concept to a polished script. This course is designed to equip students with the theory and structure of screenwriting so that they may mold their ideas into a professional product designed for the screen. Emphasis is upon the literary conventions of the form -- character, conflict, plot, dialogue -- as well as the technical elements which make scripts and screenwriting unique. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to conceive, develop, and craft their own original idea into a professional screenplay.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Fred Haas
Hopkinton High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Screenwriting Fundamentals Section TS
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: Have you ever had an idea that you thought would make a great movie? Most of us have, but it's a huge leap from a rough concept to a polished script. This course is designed to equip students with the theory and structure of screenwriting so that they may mold their ideas into a professional product designed for the screen. Emphasis is upon the literary conventions of the form -- character, conflict, plot, dialogue -- as well as the technical elements which make scripts and screenwriting unique. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to conceive, develop, and craft their own original idea into a professional screenplay.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Tim Sidmore
Ipswich High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Shakespeare in Films Section DP
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: strong reading comprehension
Description:
“‘Tis needful that the most immodest word Be looked upon and learned.” --Henry IV, Part Two

Attention all movie buffs! Are you the kind of person who likes to talk about movies you've seen? Do you like to discuss why actors have performed scenes in certain ways? Do you get frustrated—or amazed—at the changes that are made when a story or play goes on the silver screen? If you've answered "yes" to any of these questions, then this is the class for you.

We will read four Shakespearean plays—Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing, Henry V, and Hamlet. We will then view a variety of scenes from these plays performed by many popular actors and actresses (Leonardo DiCaprio, Mel Gibson, Emma Thompson, Kenneth Branagh, are just some of them). The focus of our assignments will be discussions and compositions on choices the actors and directors have made and how those different choices lend different meanings to the plays.

Some of the topics include:
*family relationships
*love (of course)
*imagery
*life decisions
*tragedy vs. comedy
*visual and aural aspects of a film
*death
*and many other common literary themes as well as film technology

Come join us for a few weeks of reading, watching videos, and discussing our favorite Bard!

Hey, and don’t forget the popcorn!

“Thou art a scholar! Let us therefore eat and drink.” --Twelfth Night

***All books for this course are available online at shakespeare@mit.edu.
Students who desire a traditional textbook should be prepared to purchase a book at their own cost through Amazon.com or a similar website.***David Pascucci
Littleton MA High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Simsbury Health 11 Issues & Advocacy Project
Discipline: Life Skills/Health
Grade Level: 11
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites:
Description: This course provides knowledge and skills pertaining to contemporary teenage health issues as chosen by the students. Students will develop and lead an advocacy campaign for their peers in order to demonstrate the ability to access and evaluate sources, accurately identify the reasons that teenagers participate in unhealthy behaviors, and accurately evaluate the work of self and others.

Students will practice 21st century leadership and diversity skills such as creative problem-solving, learning from success and failure, appropriate risk-taking, accepting people the way they are, listening to someone else’s perspective, and coming to a compromise with someone else.

Students will examine teenage health issues through completing online Work Assignments, Course Room discussions and completing an Advocacy Project. The activities and readings will vary each week. Students will research a health issue important to them and present the final project to the class.

Student grades will be based on an electronic portfolio of written work and participation in class discussions.

All course material is included within the online course. There is no need to purchase textbooks or material of any kind.Leeanna Horn
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sociology Private Offering HHS (T2)
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Full Year
Prerequisites:
Description: ** This is a private offering for Holly High School students **
Sociology students examine the influence of society, the groups we belong to, and institutions like government, family, education, religion, media, etc. on human behavior. We use popular movies and contemporary events, plus research, as the foundations for class discussions of issues such as crime and who defines criminal behavior and the legal response to it; gender inequality in the workplace; and the impact of media on violence and sexual behavior. Poverty and minority groups are discussed with a focus on how being a person of color shapes one's opportunities and life chances. Learners are exposed to the possibility of community-wide responses to social problems, instead of the "fix the individual" approach. Learners will also experience the scientific method of studying society, through design and execution of a survey and interpretation of results.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Charlie Gragg
Holly High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sociology Section BD
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Sociology students examine the influence of society, the groups we belong to, and institutions like government, family, education, religion, media, etc. on human behavior. We use popular movies and contemporary events, plus research, as the foundations for class discussions of issues such as crime and who defines criminal behavior and the legal response to it; gender inequality in the workplace; and the impact of media on violence and sexual behavior. Poverty and minority groups are discussed with a focus on how being a person of color shapes one's opportunities and life chances. Learners are exposed to the possibility of community-wide responses to social problems, instead of the "fix the individual" approach. Learners will also experience the scientific method of studying society, through design and execution of a survey and interpretation of results.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Benjamin Dow
Port Townsend High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sociology Section CL
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Sociology students examine the influence of society, the groups we belong to, and institutions like government, family, education, religion, media, etc. on human behavior. We use popular movies and contemporary events, plus research, as the foundations for class discussions of issues such as crime and who defines criminal behavior and the legal response to it; gender inequality in the workplace; and the impact of media on violence and sexual behavior. Poverty and minority groups are discussed with a focus on how being a person of color shapes one's opportunities and life chances. Learners are exposed to the possibility of community-wide responses to social problems, instead of the "fix the individual" approach. Learners will also experience the scientific method of studying society, through design and execution of a survey and interpretation of results.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Christopher Lina
Alice Costello School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sociology Section LT
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Sociology students examine the influence of society, the groups we belong to, and institutions like government, family, education, religion, media, etc. on human behavior. We use popular movies and contemporary events, plus research, as the foundations for class discussions of issues such as crime and who defines criminal behavior and the legal response to it; gender inequality in the workplace; and the impact of media on violence and sexual behavior. Poverty and minority groups are discussed with a focus on how being a person of color shapes one's opportunities and life chances. Learners are exposed to the possibility of community-wide responses to social problems, instead of the "fix the individual" approach. Learners will also experience the scientific method of studying society, through design and execution of a survey and interpretation of results.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Lisa Tvenstrup
Ponaganset High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sociology Section MJ
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites:
Description: Sociology students examine the influence of society, the groups we belong to, and institutions like government, family, education, religion, media, etc. on human behavior. We use popular movies and contemporary events, plus research, as the foundations for class discussions of issues such as crime and who defines criminal behavior and the legal response to it; gender inequality in the workplace; and the impact of media on violence and sexual behavior. Poverty and minority groups are discussed with a focus on how being a person of color shapes one's opportunities and life chances. Learners are exposed to the possibility of community-wide responses to social problems, instead of the "fix the individual" approach. Learners will also experience the scientific method of studying society, through design and execution of a survey and interpretation of results.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*Marla James
Union Catholic Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Spanish Culture and 20th Century Hispanic Literature Section DR
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Spanish 3 or equivalent; it is assumed that students have already learned the grammar and syntax of the language and have acquired strong skills in speaking, writing, reading, and understanding Spanish. This course will meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in the Spanish language.

Students taking this course should be native English speakers or as fluent in English as native English speakers. This course is not designed for ELL/ESL students who are not highly proficient in English

Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students have access to a computer with headphone, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Instructions are provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: Are you a motivated Spanish student who likes to surf the Web? Are you interested in learning more about Spanish culture and 20th century Hispanic Literature? Do you like to take your learning out of the classroom and interact with students from all over the world? Then, this is the course for you.

In this Upper Level Honors course, students will be exposed to many different forms of written and spoken Spanish through the study of poems, short stories, newspaper articles, along with radio and television broadcasts. You will take a virtual tour of Barcelona, view paintings in the Prado Museum in Madrid, listen to the top 40 hits on Madrid radio, and much, much more.

This course focuses on reading, writing, listening, and communicating in the Spanish language and is designed to develop the following competencies:
· Communicate effectively orally and in writing using complete sentences, correct grammar, and appropriate vocabulary
· Acquire vocabulary and a grasp of structure to increase the comprehension of both written and spoken Spanish
· Enhance awareness of Hispanic Culture.Daniel Rodriguez
Pequannock Township High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Spanish Culture and 20th Century Hispanic Literature Section KF
Discipline: Foreign Language
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Spanish 3 or equivalent; it is assumed that students have already learned the grammar and syntax of the language and have acquired strong skills in speaking, writing, reading, and understanding Spanish. This course will meet the needs of highly motivated students who have a strong interest and ability in the Spanish language.

Students taking this course should be native English speakers or as fluent in English as native English speakers. This course is not designed for ELL/ESL students who are not highly proficient in English

Students will need access to Power Point, Quick Time, and Real Player. This course requires students have access to a computer with headphone, microphone, and software to record voice and save in WAV format. Instructions are provided for Sound Recorder, used in Windows. Other software may be substituted, as long as it has the ability to record up to 2 minutes of voice in the WAV format.
Description: Are you a motivated Spanish student who likes to surf the Web? Are you interested in learning more about Spanish culture and 20th century Hispanic Literature? Do you like to take your learning out of the classroom and interact with students from all over the world? Then, this is the course for you.

In this Upper Level Honors course, students will be exposed to many different forms of written and spoken Spanish through the study of poems, short stories, newspaper articles, along with radio and television broadcasts. You will take a virtual tour of Barcelona, view paintings in the Prado Museum in Madrid, listen to the top 40 hits on Madrid radio, and much, much more.

This course focuses on reading, writing, listening, and communicating in the Spanish language and is designed to develop the following competencies:
· Communicate effectively orally and in writing using complete sentences, correct grammar, and appropriate vocabulary
· Acquire vocabulary and a grasp of structure to increase the comprehension of both written and spoken Spanish
· Enhance awareness of Hispanic Culture.Karen Cribbin Fitzpatrick
Bethlehem Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sports and Society Section AD
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Must have completed at least one year of American History.
Description: This course will focus on the evolving role of Sports in American Society. Students will examine the history of sports and its relationship with race, gender, economics & politics in the United States. Additional topics will include: pressures of sports from adolescence through college, supplement & drug abuse, violence in sports, and exploring sport-related careers. Students will also develop skills in historical research, analysis, and interpretation. Students will be expected to participate in a variety of activities including: weekly discussions about required reading and current events, online field trips, research projects, and group activites.Anthony Dibona
Henry P. Becton Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sports and Society Section GF
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Must have completed at least one year of American History.
Description: This course will focus on the evolving role of Sports in American Society. Students will examine the history of sports and its relationship with race, gender, economics & politics in the United States. Additional topics will include: pressures of sports from adolescence through college, supplement & drug abuse, violence in sports, and exploring sport-related careers. Students will also develop skills in historical research, analysis, and interpretation. Students will be expected to participate in a variety of activities including: weekly discussions about required reading and current events, online field trips, research projects, and group activites.Gary Furlong
Milton High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sports and Society Section JD
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Must have completed at least one year of American History.
Description: This course will focus on the evolving role of Sports in American Society. Students will examine the history of sports and its relationship with race, gender, economics & politics in the United States. Additional topics will include: pressures of sports from adolescence through college, supplement & drug abuse, violence in sports, and exploring sport-related careers. Students will also develop skills in historical research, analysis, and interpretation. Students will be expected to participate in a variety of activities including: weekly discussions about required reading and current events, online field trips, research projects, and group activites.Jon Demarco
Revere High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sports and Society Section SP
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Must have completed at least one year of American History.
Description: This course will focus on the evolving role of Sports in American Society. Students will examine the history of sports and its relationship with race, gender, economics & politics in the United States. Additional topics will include: pressures of sports from adolescence through college, supplement & drug abuse, violence in sports, and exploring sport-related careers. Students will also develop skills in historical research, analysis, and interpretation. Students will be expected to participate in a variety of activities including: weekly discussions about required reading and current events, online field trips, research projects, and group activites.Stephen Poletto
Bogota Jr./Sr. High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Sports and Society Section TR
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Must have completed at least one year of American History.
Description: This course will focus on the evolving role of Sports in American Society. Students will examine the history of sports and its relationship with race, gender, economics & politics in the United States. Additional topics will include: pressures of sports from adolescence through college, supplement & drug abuse, violence in sports, and exploring sport-related careers. Students will also develop skills in historical research, analysis, and interpretation. Students will be expected to participate in a variety of activities including: weekly discussions about required reading and current events, online field trips, research projects, and group activities.Timothy Regan
Richland High School


* - - - *

Course Title: Statistics Honors Section RD: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability to use simple algebraic formulas.

Students need to have access to a graphing calculator to complete course activities.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Statistics and Business Quality Management" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
What is the average height of the students at your school? What is the average height of all high school students? Is the data presented in the news reliable? Was it collected correctly?

Have you ever wondered about the answers to questions like those? This course will give you some of the tools necessary to try and answer questions like those. It will also give you an introduction to some of the topics that are in an AP Statistics course. You will be collecting and analyzing data, you will be participating in discussions with your classmates, you will be plotting data, and hopefully, you will find the answers to some of the previous questions.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Raymond Dunn
Monadnock Regional School District


* - - - *,
Course Title: Statistics Honors Section RD: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability to use simple algebraic formulas.

Students need to have access to a graphing calculator to complete course activities.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Statistics and Business Quality Management" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
What is the average height of the students at your school? What is the average height of all high school students? Is the data presented in the news reliable? Was it collected correctly?

Have you ever wondered about the answers to questions like those? This course will give you some of the tools necessary to try and answer questions like those. It will also give you an introduction to some of the topics that are in an AP Statistics course. You will be collecting and analyzing data, you will be participating in discussions with your classmates, you will be plotting data, and hopefully, you will find the answers to some of the previous questions.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Raymond Dunn
Monadnock Regional School District


* - - - *

Course Title: Statistics Honors Section SS: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability to use simple algebraic formulas.

Students need to have access to a graphing calculator to complete course activities.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Statistics and Business Quality Management" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
What is the average height of the students at your school? What is the average height of all high school students? Is the data presented in the news reliable? Was it collected correctly?

Have you ever wondered about the answers to questions like those? This course will give you some of the tools necessary to try and answer questions like those. It will also give you an introduction to some of the topics that are in an AP Statistics course. You will be collecting and analyzing data, you will be participating in discussions with your classmates, you will be plotting data, and hopefully, you will find the answers to some of the previous questions.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Sule Simsek
Central Jersey College Prep Charter School


* - - - *,
Course Title: Statistics Honors Section SS: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Ability to use simple algebraic formulas.

Students need to have access to a graphing calculator to complete course activities.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Statistics and Business Quality Management" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
What is the average height of the students at your school? What is the average height of all high school students? Is the data presented in the news reliable? Was it collected correctly?

Have you ever wondered about the answers to questions like those? This course will give you some of the tools necessary to try and answer questions like those. It will also give you an introduction to some of the topics that are in an AP Statistics course. You will be collecting and analyzing data, you will be participating in discussions with your classmates, you will be plotting data, and hopefully, you will find the answers to some of the previous questions.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Sule Simsek
Central Jersey College Prep Charter School


* - - - *

Course Title: Statistics Honors Section VC: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Ability to use simple algebraic formulas.

Students need to have access to a graphing calculator to complete course activities.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Statistics and Business Quality Management" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
What is the average height of the students at your school? What is the average height of all high school students? Is the data presented in the news reliable? Was it collected correctly?

Have you ever wondered about the answers to questions like those? This course will give you some of the tools necessary to try and answer questions like those. It will also give you an introduction to some of the topics that are in an AP Statistics course. You will be collecting and analyzing data, you will be participating in discussions with your classmates, you will be plotting data, and hopefully, you will find the answers to some of the previous questions.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Vern Cedarlund
Eugene Public School District 4J


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Course Title: Statistics Honors Section VC: An Introduction
Discipline: Mathematics
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Pre-AP
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Ability to use simple algebraic formulas.

Students need to have access to a graphing calculator to complete course activities.
Description: Note: This course is intended to teach and reinforce crucial academic skills to help students strengthen their background in the subject area prior to taking an advanced level course. Students who have already taken the Virtual High School course "Statistics and Business Quality Management" should not take this course.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
What is the average height of the students at your school? What is the average height of all high school students? Is the data presented in the news reliable? Was it collected correctly?

Have you ever wondered about the answers to questions like those? This course will give you some of the tools necessary to try and answer questions like those. It will also give you an introduction to some of the topics that are in an AP Statistics course. You will be collecting and analyzing data, you will be participating in discussions with your classmates, you will be plotting data, and hopefully, you will find the answers to some of the previous questions.

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.*

**Please Note: This course may not be appropriate for students with specific accessibility limitations as written. Please refer to the VHS Handbook policy on Special Education/Equity for more information on possible modifications. If you need additional assistance, please let us know at service.goVHS.org.Vern Cedarlund
Eugene Public School District 4J


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Course Title: The Glory of Ancient Rome Section FC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: A background in World History and strong writing skills
Description: Come explore the “Eternal City” –Rome—which rose from a small village in central Italy to become mistress of one of the largest and longest lasting empires in all of history. Stretching from England to Syria, the Roman Empire persisted for centuries and laid the foundation for all of the rest of Western history. We will examine in detail some of the major accomplishments of ancient Roman art and literature and investigate how this society was able to create and maintain its amazingly durable cultural institutions.

This honors-level course covers the equivalent of an undergraduate Classics survey class. In it we will read (in translation!) selections from original Latin texts, take (virtual!) tours of Rome and of some of the other major archaeological monuments of the Roman Empire, and engage in active online discussions and group work as we reflect on what we read and see.

CAVEAT: This class will address fundamental issues of the human condition, including human sexuality, so a mature attitude is a sine qua non. Moreover, given the large amount of online surfing this course entails, a fast DSL-computer connection would be very helpful. Francis Cusick
Tewksbury Memorial High School


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Course Title: The Glory of Ancient Rome Section JK
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: A background in World History and strong writing skills
Description: Come explore the “Eternal City” –Rome—which rose from a small village in central Italy to become mistress of one of the largest and longest lasting empires in all of history. Stretching from England to Syria, the Roman Empire persisted for centuries and laid the foundation for all of the rest of Western history. We will examine in detail some of the major accomplishments of ancient Roman art and literature and investigate how this society was able to create and maintain its amazingly durable cultural institutions.

This honors-level course covers the equivalent of an undergraduate Classics survey class. In it we will read (in translation!) selections from original Latin texts, take (virtual!) tours of Rome and of some of the other major archaeological monuments of the Roman Empire, and engage in active online discussions and group work as we reflect on what we read and see.

CAVEAT: This class will address fundamental issues of the human condition, including human sexuality, so a mature attitude is a sine qua non. Moreover, given the large amount of online surfing this course entails, a fast DSL-computer connection would be very helpful. Jeffery Keller
John Handley High School


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Course Title: The Golden Age of Classical Greece Section LR
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: A background in World History and strong writing skills
Description: Come explore the literature, history, art, archaeology, and philosophy of 5th-century-BC Greece. Learn how a handful of small city-states developed an intellectual and artistic culture that served as the foundation for the Roman Empire, the Medieval Arab world, and the European Renaissance. Through an in-depth examination of original works, we will investigate this remarkable ancient society that first developed so much of what is now taken for granted in Western thought.

This honors course covers the equivalent of an undergraduate survey Classics course. In it we will read (in translations!) selections from original Greek texts, take (virtual!) tours of some of the major archaeological monuments of Classical Greece, and engage in active online discussions and group work as we reflect on what we read and see. The course will utilize a wide variety of web resources, including online texts of Sophocles, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Herodotus, and Thucydides. The readings and assignments in this course address such fundamental issues as the nature of humanism, science, philosophy, and history.


Throughout this course, students will develop critical thinking and writing skills in the presentation of short essays that synthesize the ideas addressed in the course.

While students should be prepared to do a substantial amount of reading (approximately 50 pages per week) and writing (paragraph-long weekly postings; two 3-to-5-page essays; and one, 5-to-10- page, final paper), this course is not set up to be a grind! Yes, this is a serious course; but at the same time you should be ready to be amazed, and to have fun, as we spend a semester basking in the intellectual light that still shines from the ancient Mediterranean world of Classical Greece!

CAVEAT: Some of this course involves the examination of Classical Greek art, including the nude human form. A mature attitude on the part of the student is necessary, and a fast DSL-computer connection would be very useful.Linda Rountree
Simsbury High School


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Course Title: The Holocaust Section JB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: To properly understand the Holocaust, students will become familiar with the
history of Anti-Semitism. They will investigate the historical conditions that
allowed the rise of Hitler in Germany. We will study the use of propaganda in
creating the Nazi Regime. Two books will be read: Night by Elie Wiesel and
All But My Life by Gerda Weismann Klein, both authors being Holocaust
survivors. Our readings will reveal how life changed for those marked by the
Nazi as undesirable and how the “Final Solution” was played out in the
concentration camps. We will take a virtual tour of the U.S. Holocaust Museum.
Students will be engaging fundamental questions about human nature, prejudice
and violence, since the terror of genocide continues to be with us.Jason Bendig
Hammonton High School


* - - - *

Course Title: The Holocaust Section JC
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: To properly understand the Holocaust, students will become familiar with the
history of Anti-Semitism. They will investigate the historical conditions that
allowed the rise of Hitler in Germany. We will study the use of propaganda in
creating the Nazi Regime. Two books will be read: Night by Elie Wiesel and
All But My Life by Gerda Weismann Klein, both authors being Holocaust
survivors. Our readings will reveal how life changed for those marked by the
Nazi as undesirable and how the “Final Solution” was played out in the
concentration camps. We will take a virtual tour of the U.S. Holocaust Museum.
Students will be engaging fundamental questions about human nature, prejudice
and violence, since the terror of genocide continues to be with us.Jeffrey Curran
Blackstone-Millville Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: The Holocaust Section MB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: TTo properly understand the Holocaust, students will become familiar with the
history of Anti-Semitism. They will investigate the historical conditions that
allowed the rise of Hitler in Germany. We will study the use of propaganda in
creating the Nazi Regime. Two books will be read: Night by Elie Wiesel and
All But My Life by Gerda Weismann Klein, both authors being Holocaust
survivors. Our readings will reveal how life changed for those marked by the
Nazi as undesirable and how the “Final Solution” was played out in the
concentration camps. We will take a virtual tour of the U.S. Holocaust Museum.
Students will be engaging fundamental questions about human nature, prejudice
and violence, since the terror of genocide continues to be with us.Michael Bruno
Barnegat High School


* - - - *

Course Title: The Holocaust Section TK
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: To properly understand the Holocaust, students will become familiar with the
history of Anti-Semitism. They will investigate the historical conditions that
allowed the rise of Hitler in Germany. We will study the use of propaganda in
creating the Nazi Regime. Two books will be read: Night by Elie Wiesel and
All But My Life by Gerda Weismann Klein, both authors being Holocaust
survivors. Our readings will reveal how life changed for those marked by the
Nazi as undesirable and how the “Final Solution” was played out in the
concentration camps. We will take a virtual tour of the U.S. Holocaust Museum.
Students will be engaging fundamental questions about human nature, prejudice
and violence, since the terror of genocide continues to be with us.Theodore Kempinski
Haverhill High School


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Course Title: The Human Body Section DB
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Access to PowerPoint software and Word-compatible word processor (DOC or DOCX), and familiar enough with software to create a PowerPoint presentation.
Description: Did you ever wonder how your body works? Take a journey through the major systems of the human body with us! Although this course is an introductory level class, it provides a comprehensive overview of the workings of the human body. We use many online readings and animations, as well as field trips to selected web sites in our exploration. You will join your fellow classmates as you investigate how the human body functions. Your critical reading and organizational skills, ability to communicate, and most of all, your curiosity will help you succeed in this course. You will never watch CSI with the same eyes again! The Human Body is a course designed to familiarize you with the key systems of the human body and how they function. The course studies the structures and basic functions of organs involved in the body systems.David Breski
Monomoy Regional School District


* - - - *

Course Title: The Human Body Section DH
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Access to PowerPoint software and Word-compatible word processor (DOC or DOCX), and familiar enough with software to create a PowerPoint presentation.
Description: Did you ever wonder how your body works? Take a journey through the major systems of the human body with us! Although this course is an introductory level class, it provides a comprehensive overview of the workings of the human body. We use many online readings and animations, as well as field trips to selected web sites in our exploration. You will join your fellow classmates as you investigate how the human body functions. Your critical reading and organizational skills, ability to communicate, and most of all, your curiosity will help you succeed in this course. You will never watch CSI with the same eyes again! The Human Body is a course designed to familiarize you with the key systems of the human body and how they function. The course studies the structures and basic functions of organs involved in the body systems.
Delora Hutchinson
Madison Area Memorial High School


* - - - *

Course Title: The Human Body Section JR
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Access to PowerPoint software and Word-compatible word processor (DOC or DOCX), and familiar enough with software to create a PowerPoint presentation.
Description: Did you ever wonder how your body works? Take a journey through the major systems of the human body with us! Although this course is an introductory level class, it provides a comprehensive overview of the workings of the human body. We use many online readings and animations, as well as field trips to selected web sites in our exploration. You will join your fellow classmates as you investigate how the human body functions. Your critical reading and organizational skills, ability to communicate, and most of all, your curiosity will help you succeed in this course. You will never watch CSI with the same eyes again! The Human Body is a course designed to familiarize you with the key systems of the human body and how they function. The course studies the structures and basic functions of organs involved in the body systems.John Riley
Jonathan Alder High School


* - - - *

Course Title: The Human Body Section SC
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Access to PowerPoint software and Word-compatible word processor (DOC or DOCX), and familiar enough with software to create a PowerPoint presentation.
Description: Did you ever wonder how your body works? Take a journey through the major systems of the human body with us! Although this course is an introductory level class, it provides a comprehensive overview of the workings of the human body. We use many online readings and animations, as well as field trips to selected web sites in our exploration. You will join your fellow classmates as you investigate how the human body functions. Your critical reading and organizational skills, ability to communicate, and most of all, your curiosity will help you succeed in this course. You will never watch CSI with the same eyes again! The Human Body is a course designed to familiarize you with the key systems of the human body and how they function. The course studies the structures and basic functions of organs involved in the body systems.Sarah Copeland
Nazareth Academy


* - - - *

Course Title: The Human Body Section WP
Discipline: Science - Biology
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Access to PowerPoint software and Word-compatible word processor (DOC or DOCX), and familiar enough with software to create a PowerPoint presentation.

Description: Did you ever wonder how your body works? Take a journey through the major systems of the human body with us! Although this course is an introductory level class, it provides a comprehensive overview of the workings of the human body. We use many online readings and animations, as well as field trips to selected web sites in our exploration. You will join your fellow classmates as you investigate how the human body functions. Your critical reading and organizational skills, ability to communicate, and most of all, your curiosity will help you succeed in this course. You will never watch CSI with the same eyes again! The Human Body is a course designed to familiarize you with the key systems of the human body and how they function. The course studies the structures and basic functions of organs involved in the body systems.
William Peace
Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School


* - - - *

Course Title: The Vietnam War section EP
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Willingness and ability to read a minimum of 20-25 pages per week
Description:

*** This course will use readings that contain profanity and mature themes.***

Vietnam -- because of it, our nation was changed forever. Take this class and find out what the fuss was all about. Discover why THE WALL can evoke such emotion from those who lived through that era. Find out how the United States could enter a struggle where it won every battle and yet lost the war. Learn how we stumbled into this conflict to fight communism, and ended up fighting each other. Have you ever heard of Kent State or Ho Chi Minh or Hanoi Jane? Have you ever wondered about B-52's, M-16's, Peaceniks, Hawks, Doves, and Hippies? Do you know where to find the Mekong Delta, the Parrot's Beak, the DMZ, Cambodia, Laos, or Camelot? And what happened in Chicago? What is the significance of Agent Orange, Green Berets, AK- 47's, and "All We Are Saying is Give Peace a Chance." The Vietnam War is still an open wound in this country that will not go away. It is one of the most divisive periods in our nation's history and the only war our nation has ever lost. The Vietnam War lasted through the administrations of five presidents. The Vietnam War was and is a national tragedy. Take this class and find out what the fuss is all about.

In this class, we will explore the history, the causes, and the results of the Vietnam Conflict. We will begin with an analysis of Vietnam itself; its people, its ancient beginnings, its complex culture, and its geography. We will delve into the roots of this conflict in the French colonial experience before and after the Second World War. We will examine the beginnings of American involvement in Vietnam in the context of politics, diplomacy, and economics. We will study the military aspects of the conflict in terms of strategy, tactics, weapons, and battles. We will compare and contrast the impact of this conflict on the administrations of Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon. We will investigate the antiwar movement and learn of its impact on the war's outcome. We will learn how America's involvement in this conflict came to an end and how the conflict itself eventually came to an end.Eric Paulus
Norton High School


* - - - *

Course Title: The Vietnam War section RL
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Willingness and ability to read a minimum of 20-25 pages per week
Description:

*** This course will use readings that contain profanity and mature themes.***

Vietnam -- because of it, our nation was changed forever. Take this class and find out what the fuss was all about. Discover why THE WALL can evoke such emotion from those who lived through that era. Find out how the United States could enter a struggle where it won every battle and yet lost the war. Learn how we stumbled into this conflict to fight communism, and ended up fighting each other. Have you ever heard of Kent State or Ho Chi Minh or Hanoi Jane? Have you ever wondered about B-52's, M-16's, Peaceniks, Hawks, Doves, and Hippies? Do you know where to find the Mekong Delta, the Parrot's Beak, the DMZ, Cambodia, Laos, or Camelot? And what happened in Chicago? What is the significance of Agent Orange, Green Berets, AK- 47's, and "All We Are Saying is Give Peace a Chance." The Vietnam War is still an open wound in this country that will not go away. It is one of the most divisive periods in our nation's history and the only war our nation has ever lost. The Vietnam War lasted through the administrations of five presidents. The Vietnam War was and is a national tragedy. Take this class and find out what the fuss is all about.

In this class, we will explore the history, the causes, and the results of the Vietnam Conflict. We will begin with an analysis of Vietnam itself; its people, its ancient beginnings, its complex culture, and its geography. We will delve into the roots of this conflict in the French colonial experience before and after the Second World War. We will examine the beginnings of American involvement in Vietnam in the context of politics, diplomacy, and economics. We will study the military aspects of the conflict in terms of strategy, tactics, weapons, and battles. We will compare and contrast the impact of this conflict on the administrations of Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon. We will investigate the antiwar movement and learn of its impact on the war's outcome. We will learn how America's involvement in this conflict came to an end and how the conflict itself eventually came to an end.Ryan Larkin
Upper Merion Area High School


* - - - *

Course Title: To Kill a Mockingbird Section JC
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 07, 08, 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: Each student will need to obtain a copy of "To Kill a Mockingbird". Most students can obtain a copy of this book from their school library or public library.
Description: Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, is one of the most influential pieces of literature in U.S. history. Written in 1960 at the height of the civil rights movement, and set in the Depression-Era South, the novel teaches us much about the history of a nation at a key crossroads in its moral journey. Atticus, Scout and Jem Finch, Calpurnia, Dill, Tom Robinson, and the mysterious, reclusive Boo Radley, are characters forever woven into the tapestry of the American imagination. Author Lee masterfully uses these characters to explore the meaning of justice and what it means to be a citizen in a democracy.

This course not only presents the opportunity for an in-depth analysis of the literary merits of To Kill a Mockingbird, but also examines the history that inform the story. Historical explorations on such topics as Jim Crow laws and the Great Depression will expand students’ understandings of the choices made by the citizens of Maycomb County, Alabama. Students will be in conversation about significant themes and issues raised in the novel, such as membership, justice, mob behavior, parenting, prejudice, and racism and its legacies. And throughout the course, students will have opportunities to connect these important issues to their own lives, today.

Through thoughtful discussions, assignments and activities, students will learn the true value of the wise words Atticus Finch shared with his daughter, Scout:” You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view.” (from Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Ch. 3.)

*This course may be appropriate for Gifted and Talented middle school students that meet all course prerequisites.Joanna Cipriano
Notre Dame High School - Fairfield


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Course Title: Twentieth Century Women Authors Section KO
Discipline: Language Arts
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Honors
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: None
Description: This English course will explore literature written by America's female novelists. We will begin the course with material written at the start of the
twentieth century and trace its progression to the new millennium. Through research on the author's background and critical analysis of the
writing, students will chronicle in historical context the changing role of women socially, politically, and economically.

Students who enjoy literature and history are encouraged to sign up for this course. This class does not have a gender bias :-)

Reading selections for this course may include material from the list below.

THE AWAKENING by Kate Chopin
ETHAN FROME by Edith Wharton
THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD by Zora Neale Hurston
YONNONDIO by Tillie Olsen
ANIMAL DREAMS by Barbara Kingsolver
THE BEAN TREES by Barbara Kingsolver
THE JOY LUCK CLUB by Amy TanKaren Orfitelli
Falmouth MA High School


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Course Title: U.S. Foreign Policy Section SG: 1945 - Present
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: U.S. History (from 1900 - Present)
Description: This course will trace the development of American foreign policy, particularly national security policies, from 1945 to 2001. We will focus on the evolution of the U.S. role in the world from a Cold Warrior to a Peacekeeper. Students will use the Internet extensively and work with materials from Brown University's Choices Education Project. They will play roles as presidential advisors in simulated debates and draw lessons from past foreign policy experiences, including the Cold War, Vietnam War, the Gulf War and recent international actions in Bosnia and Kosovo. Online subscription to "American Choices" is part of this VHS course. Access is provided through the teacher's school.Shane Gower
Maranacook Community High School


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Course Title: U.S. History: 1754-1877
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: none
Description: This course is designed to give students a better understanding of United States history from 1754 to 1877. Students will study the major topics and themes that surround this time period and walk away from the course with a deeper understanding of early United States History. As part of this course, students will also be analyzing various primary and secondary sources that relate to each of the topics being studied.

The themes that this course will focus on are Revolution, Equality, and Compromise. Students will have to assess how these ideas run through and relate them to people and events.

Students will also be engaged in multiple discussions, various assignments that use Web 2.0 tools, and they will complete a semester long group collaboration project.

Recurring Resources Used

· www.PBS.org
· www.ushistory.org
· www.history.com
· www.hippocampus.orgColleen Bonner
Red Bank Catholic High School


* - - - *

Course Title: U.S. History: 1877-Present
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Repeated Semester
Prerequisites: none
Description: Students will study the time periods spanning from the end of Reconstruction to the Present Day United States. They will examine and evaluate the different economic, social, and political factors that led to changes and growth of the United States. There will be a key focus on analyzing primary and secondary source documents to help understand the lives of the diverse people who make up the United States. Students will also have the opportunity to create original and thoughtful projects through collaboration with their peers using high order thinking skills.
Matthew Hall
Virtual High School


* - - - *

Course Title: U.S. History: 1877-Present Section KB
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisites: none
Description: Students will study the time periods spanning from the end of Reconstruction to the Present Day United States. They will examine and evaluate the different economic, social, and political factors that led to changes and growth of the United States. There will be a key focus on analyzing primary and secondary source documents to help understand the lives of the diverse people who make up the United States. Students will also have the opportunity to create original and thoughtful projects through collaboration with their peers using high order thinking skills.
Kristin Buckmaster
Sun Valley High School


* - - - *

Course Title: U.S. History: 1877-Present Summer Offering
Discipline: Social Studies
Grade Level: 09, 10, 11, 12
Level: Standard
Offering: Summer I, Summer II
Prerequisites: none
Description: The U.S. History: 1877-Present Summer Offering, is designed to help students engage and understand significant events, peoples, ideas, and eras of the second half of the American history survey. Content is divided into 10 modules explored over a 4 week session. Major political, social, economic, cultural, and military events are analyzed in the context of United States domestic, international, and global affairs.

Topics of study include the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the Cold War, and Globalization.

Through this online course,